World-net throttling p2p bandwidth ...

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Young Man, May 9, 2005.

  1. Young Man

    Young Man Guest

    My p2p via bitcomet was working just perfectly through my isp world-net. I
    had been getting
    good dl and ul rates for about 3 months. I've just come back from overseas
    to find my p2p rates have dropped to around 1k/s (both dl and ul rates). At
    all times the "health" of the torrent is well into the 3000% range and I am
    connected to numerous seeds and peers. I had my cousin in Oz download the
    same torrent and he sky rocketed to 50k/s in under a minute.

    In fact come to think of it I feel world-net maybe throttling all ports as
    my msn audio chat has become really laggy and I've been dropping out of MSN
    fairly often.

    Is there any way around this or am I screwed for good.
    Young Man, May 9, 2005
    #1
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  2. Young Man

    Shane Guest

    On Mon, 09 May 2005 12:11:25 +1200, Young Man wrote:

    > My p2p via bitcomet was working just perfectly through my isp world-net. I
    > had been getting
    > good dl and ul rates for about 3 months. I've just come back from overseas
    > to find my p2p rates have dropped to around 1k/s (both dl and ul rates). At
    > all times the "health" of the torrent is well into the 3000% range and I am
    > connected to numerous seeds and peers. I had my cousin in Oz download the
    > same torrent and he sky rocketed to 50k/s in under a minute.
    >
    > In fact come to think of it I feel world-net maybe throttling all ports as
    > my msn audio chat has become really laggy and I've been dropping out of MSN
    > fairly often.
    >
    > Is there any way around this or am I screwed for good.


    option 2) your computer has become infected with malware which may be
    interfering with your tcp/ip stack


    --
    Hardware, n.: The parts of a computer system that can be kicked

    The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.
    Shane, May 9, 2005
    #2
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  3. Young Man

    Young Man Guest

    "Shane" <-a-geek.net> wrote in message
    news:p-a-geek.net...
    > On Mon, 09 May 2005 12:11:25 +1200, Young Man wrote:
    > option 2) your computer has become infected with malware which may be
    > interfering with your tcp/ip stack


    I don't think so. I've run ad-aware and spybot as well as norton antivirus
    and everythings come up clean.

    > The best way to get the right answer on usenet is to post the wrong one.


    I see what you're trying to do. ;-)
    Young Man, May 9, 2005
    #3
  4. Young Man

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "Young Man" <> wrote in news:d5m9rd$huk$1
    @domitilla.aioe.org:

    > Is there any way around this or am I screwed for good.
    >


    Try changing the ports of you P2P apps.
    It is possible that the common ports have been throttled at your ISP. Call
    them and ask.

    --
    Ciao, Dave
    Dave Taylor, May 9, 2005
    #4
  5. Young Man

    Evil Bastard Guest

    Dave Taylor wrote:
    >>Is there any way around this or am I screwed for good.


    > Try changing the ports of you P2P apps.
    > It is possible that the common ports have been throttled at your ISP. Call
    > them and ask.


    More and more ISPs these days are adopting a 'whitelist' bandwidth
    policy, that is, allowing full speed only on known basic 'consumer'
    traffic such as:
    - http (web) downstream
    - ftp downstream
    - IM traffic (eg ymessenger, icq) both directions
    - pop3/smtp to the isp, both directions
    and throttling, to various degrees, all other traffic, such as:
    - http and ftp upstream
    - everything else

    --
    Cheers
    EB

    --

    One who is not a conservative by age 20 has no brain.
    One who is not a liberal by age 40 has no heart.
    Evil Bastard, May 9, 2005
    #5
  6. Young Man

    Young Man Guest

    "Evil Bastard" <> wrote in message
    news:427f87cf$...
    > More and more ISPs these days are adopting a 'whitelist' bandwidth
    > policy, that is, allowing full speed only on known basic 'consumer'
    > traffic such as:
    > - http (web) downstream
    > - ftp downstream
    > - IM traffic (eg ymessenger, icq) both directions
    > - pop3/smtp to the isp, both directions
    > and throttling, to various degrees, all other traffic, such as:
    > - http and ftp upstream
    > - everything else


    I suspected as such. Is there any way around this or am I stuck? I mean, I
    have no need for unlimited high speed internet if I can't download what I
    want!
    Young Man, May 9, 2005
    #6
  7. Young Man

    Evil Bastard Guest

    Young Man wrote:
    >>More and more ISPs these days are adopting a 'whitelist' bandwidth
    >>policy, that is, allowing full speed only on known basic 'consumer'
    >>traffic such as:
    >>- http (web) downstream
    >>- ftp downstream
    >>- IM traffic (eg ymessenger, icq) both directions
    >>- pop3/smtp to the isp, both directions
    >>and throttling, to various degrees, all other traffic, such as:
    >>- http and ftp upstream
    >>- everything else


    > I suspected as such. Is there any way around this or am I stuck? I mean, I
    > have no need for unlimited high speed internet if I can't download what I
    > want!


    Wake up, matey, big corporations never for a nanosecond intended to
    allow the internet to remain as a free, democratising, levelling framework.

    Consider also the fact that in nearly all ISP connection packages from
    dialup through to the fastest broadband, uplink speeds are a fraction of
    downlink speeds, usually half or much less. You're only meant to
    /consume/ content, not /generate/ or /publish/ it!

    Face it, to them you're just a marketing cash cow. You're only meant to
    log on to the net as a passive consumer, to browse websites, to
    send/receive a bit of email, maybe do a bit of chat here and there. And
    you're supposed to click on the ad banners, buy stuff from the big
    companies and book it up on your credit cards, and spend the next n
    years paying it off at 20+% interest.

    If this pisses you off (I hope it does), then why not scrape up a few
    bucks for a WLAN access point or two, hook up with a bunch of others who
    feel the same way, perhaps even hit up your local council for a grant to
    set up a municipal LAN (as councils in other cities are doing), and find
    ways to connect this public LAN to LANs in other cities.

    --
    Cheers
    EB

    --

    One who is not a conservative by age 20 has no brain.
    One who is not a liberal by age 40 has no heart.
    Evil Bastard, May 10, 2005
    #7
  8. Young Man

    Young Man Guest

    "Evil Bastard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Wake up, matey, big corporations never for a nanosecond intended to
    > allow the internet to remain as a free, democratising, levelling
    > framework.
    >
    > Consider also the fact that in nearly all ISP connection packages from
    > dialup through to the fastest broadband, uplink speeds are a fraction of
    > downlink speeds, usually half or much less. You're only meant to
    > /consume/ content, not /generate/ or /publish/ it!
    >
    > Face it, to them you're just a marketing cash cow. You're only meant to
    > log on to the net as a passive consumer, to browse websites, to
    > send/receive a bit of email, maybe do a bit of chat here and there. And
    > you're supposed to click on the ad banners, buy stuff from the big
    > companies and book it up on your credit cards, and spend the next n
    > years paying it off at 20+% interest.
    >
    > If this pisses you off (I hope it does), then why not scrape up a few
    > bucks for a WLAN access point or two, hook up with a bunch of others who
    > feel the same way, perhaps even hit up your local council for a grant to
    > set up a municipal LAN (as councils in other cities are doing), and find
    > ways to connect this public LAN to LANs in other cities.


    Indeed ... indeed.
    Young Man, May 10, 2005
    #8
  9. Young Man

    Adam Guest

    On Tue, 10 May 2005 09:50:47 +1200, Young Man wrote:

    >"Evil Bastard" <> wrote in message
    >news:427f87cf$...
    >> More and more ISPs these days are adopting a 'whitelist' bandwidth
    >> policy, that is, allowing full speed only on known basic 'consumer'
    >> traffic such as:
    >> - http (web) downstream
    >> - ftp downstream
    >> - IM traffic (eg ymessenger, icq) both directions
    >> - pop3/smtp to the isp, both directions
    >> and throttling, to various degrees, all other traffic, such as:
    >> - http and ftp upstream
    >> - everything else

    >
    >I suspected as such. Is there any way around this or am I stuck? I mean, I
    >have no need for unlimited high speed internet if I can't download what I
    >want!



    Depends on your application. E-Mule, for instance, can be configured
    to run off any port (though it still needs certain [default] ports to
    be open for searches etc). You may be able to find a port (by trial
    and error) theat your ISP *isn't* throttling.

    As a matter of interest (anyone?), could this port be set to 80 or
    8080? They're hardly likely to throttle that one, Shirley?

    Adam.
    Adam, May 10, 2005
    #9
  10. Young Man

    Evil Bastard Guest

    Adam wrote:
    > As a matter of interest (anyone?), could this port be set to 80 or
    > 8080? They're hardly likely to throttle that one, Shirley?


    Right you are...

    ....until the ISPs start to deploy protocol-based filters. If a
    connection doesn't behave just like regular http, the throttles tighten.

    Next move - p2p developers modify their protocols to talk pure compliant
    http...

    Next move - ISPs deploy smarter filters...

    Let the arms race begin!

    --
    Cheers
    EB

    --

    One who is not a conservative by age 20 has no brain.
    One who is not a liberal by age 40 has no heart.
    Evil Bastard, May 10, 2005
    #10
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