Wireless

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by zz, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. zz

    zz Guest

    Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have to
    be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks? Thanks
    in advance.
     
    zz, Jan 12, 2010
    #1
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  2. zz

    Lem Guest

    zz wrote:
    > Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    > wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have to
    > be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks? Thanks
    > in advance.
    >
    >


    You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.

    Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    interact with a wireless network.

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
    Lem, Jan 12, 2010
    #2
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  3. zz

    zz Guest

    Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can wireless
    network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity when say
    browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from their own
    cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?


    "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > zz wrote:
    >> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    >> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    >> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    >> Thanks in advance.

    >
    > You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    > connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.
    >
    > Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    > interact with a wireless network.
    >
    > --
    > Lem
    >
    > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    > http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
    zz, Jan 12, 2010
    #3
  4. zz

    Lem Guest

    zz wrote:
    > Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can wireless
    > network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity when say
    > browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from their own
    > cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> zz wrote:
    >>> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    >>> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    >>> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    >>> Thanks in advance.

    >> You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    >> connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.
    >>
    >> Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    >> interact with a wireless network.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem
    >>
    >> Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >> http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

    >
    >


    "Wireless" is a very broad term. Without context, all it means is the
    transfer of information without wires.

    In the context of computer networking, "wireless" usually means
    communication that complies with IEEE standard 802.11
    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11). This uses relatively short-range
    low-power radios. The term "WiFi" is a trademark of an alliance of
    manufacturers of equipment used for home wireless networks that comply
    with various parts of IEEE 802.11.

    Cell phones use a different radio technology. Newer cell phones (e.g.,
    the iPhone) may incorporate both cell phone and WiFi connectivity in a
    single device.

    Any radio communication, including WiFi network traffic and cell phone
    calls, can be detected and intercepted by someone with the proper radio
    receiver. For this reason, both cell phone and WiFi network
    transmissions may be encrypted for security. In the case of digital cell
    phones, the encryption (and other security technology) is configured by
    the cell phone manufacturer and/or the carrier. That is, the user isn't
    involved. In the case of WiFi networks, the default is to leave the
    transmission unencrypted (and thus easily intercepted and monitored).
    Whether to use encryption, and if so, what level of encryption, is left
    to the owner of each wireless network.

    As you might guess, there are lots of individuals who try to break the
    encryption protections of various wireless traffic. The first technology
    used for home wireless networks, WEP, is now all but useless for
    security. If you set up a wireless network today, you should use WPA2
    encryption.

    Similarly, cell phone encryption has reportedly been cracked:
    http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=7843

    Totally apart from eavesdropping on wireless transmissions, email sent
    over the Internet is not secure. An email does not go directly from
    point A to point B. Rather, it travels through a series of intermediate
    servers, any one of which can view its content. For this reason, people
    who are concerned about the security of their email often use some form
    of encryption to secure their messages.

    --
    Lem

    Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
    Lem, Jan 12, 2010
    #4
  5. Hi
    Any Wireless signal can be intercepted while it is in the Air.
    If the information that is in the signal is Not encrypted it can be easily
    used by others.
    Wireless Telephones encrypted the signal by default.
    Wireless computers have to be set to encrypt the signal.
    In general.
    From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    No Security
    Switching Off SSID (same has No Security. SSID can be easily sniffed even if
    it is Off)
    MAC Filtering______(Band Aid if nothing else is available, MAC number can be
    easily Spoofed).
    WEP64____(Easy, to "Break" by knowledgeable people).
    WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    -------------------
    The three above are Not considered safe.
    Safe Starts here at WPA.
    -------------------
    WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Break).
    WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).
    Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.
    Note 2: If you use WinXP bellow SP3 and did not updated it, you would have
    to download the WPA2 patch from Microsoft.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357
    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.
    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.
    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.
    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.
    Setting Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    The Core differences between WEP, WPA, and WPA2 -
    http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).


    "zz" <> wrote in message
    news:ekIl$...
    > Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can
    > wireless network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity
    > when say browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from
    > their own cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?
    >
    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> zz wrote:
    >>> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    >>> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    >>> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    >>> Thanks in advance.

    >>
    >> You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    >> connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.
    >>
    >> Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    >> interact with a wireless network.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem
    >>
    >> Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >> http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

    >
    >
     
    Jack [MVP-Networking], Jan 12, 2010
    #5
  6. zz

    zz Guest

    So when using a Windows Mobile 6.1 device is used as 'tethering' a single pc
    with a cell phone carrier's service then assuming the obvious that the
    signal can be detected when monitored by a wireless software detection tool
    (from a different machine on a different network within it's proximity)
    would it be up to the cell phone carrier if it's encrypted or is there a
    setting on the cell phone device that lists it? Thanks to both, very
    interesting.


    "Jack [MVP-Networking]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi
    > Any Wireless signal can be intercepted while it is in the Air.
    > If the information that is in the signal is Not encrypted it can be easily
    > used by others.
    > Wireless Telephones encrypted the signal by default.
    > Wireless computers have to be set to encrypt the signal.
    > In general.
    > From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    > No Security
    > Switching Off SSID (same has No Security. SSID can be easily sniffed even
    > if it is Off)
    > MAC Filtering______(Band Aid if nothing else is available, MAC number can
    > be easily Spoofed).
    > WEP64____(Easy, to "Break" by knowledgeable people).
    > WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    > -------------------
    > The three above are Not considered safe.
    > Safe Starts here at WPA.
    > -------------------
    > WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Break).
    > WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    > WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).
    > Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.
    > Note 2: If you use WinXP bellow SP3 and did not updated it, you would have
    > to download the WPA2 patch from Microsoft.
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357
    > The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    > Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    > your Wireless hardware.
    > All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    > phrase.
    > Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best
    > possible of one of the Wireless devices.
    > I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    > max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max .
    > of WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    > If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that
    > can do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace
    > the device with a better one.
    > Setting Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    > The Core differences between WEP, WPA, and WPA2 -
    > http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    >
    > "zz" <> wrote in message
    > news:ekIl$...
    >> Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can
    >> wireless network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity
    >> when say browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from
    >> their own cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?
    >>
    >>
    >> "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >> news:%...
    >>> zz wrote:
    >>>> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    >>>> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    >>>> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    >>>> Thanks in advance.
    >>>
    >>> You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    >>> connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.
    >>>
    >>> Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    >>> interact with a wireless network.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Lem
    >>>
    >>> Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >>> http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    zz, Jan 13, 2010
    #6
  7. zz

    Falcon ITS Guest

    On Jan 12, 11:06 am, "zz" <> wrote:
    > Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it.  Another newb question, can wireless
    > network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity when say
    > browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from their own
    > cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?



    You cell phone can pick up two types of wireless :

    1. The type that connects to cell phone towers (I think its GSM but
    that's not my field). There are tools that just became available to
    hack the sugnal which has been around since the 80's and is in need of
    update. So, phone calls and data can be intercepted.

    2. Wireless Frequency like B+G which you use to log into hotspots, or
    home wireless routers also have encryption algorithms that can be
    hacked. Also, many phone loke BB and IPhone have radios that can use
    these types of wireless signals. If you, for example, log into you
    local neighborhood's unsecured wireless, you take the risk that that
    person has a sniffer and is listening in and looking at your plain
    text data (ouch!). The same can happen at work, if the IT manager has
    a gateway device that logs usage (like an IP filter) he can usually
    track traffic back to your phone. But that all depends on the
    equipment that is in place.


    Miguel
    http://www.falconits.com
    Computer Service and Support






    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >
    > news:%...
    >
    > > zz wrote:
    > >> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    > >> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    > >> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    > >> Thanks in advance.

    >
    > > You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    > > connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.

    >
    > > Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    > > interact with a wireless network.

    >
    > > --
    > > Lem

    >
    > > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    > >http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
    Falcon ITS, Jan 13, 2010
    #7
  8. zz

    zz Guest

    Thanks also Miguel. Would tethering or use the 'phone as modem' feature on
    the cell phone device on machine 'A' be detected from another different
    machine 'B' wireless software monitor and be considered a rogue access point
    even though machine 'A' like mentioned is using it's own cell phone
    service's network plan only and not trying to enter the other machine 'B's
    network?


    "Falcon ITS" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Jan 12, 11:06 am, "zz" <> wrote:
    > Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can
    > wireless
    > network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity when say
    > browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from their own
    > cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?



    You cell phone can pick up two types of wireless :

    1. The type that connects to cell phone towers (I think its GSM but
    that's not my field). There are tools that just became available to
    hack the sugnal which has been around since the 80's and is in need of
    update. So, phone calls and data can be intercepted.

    2. Wireless Frequency like B+G which you use to log into hotspots, or
    home wireless routers also have encryption algorithms that can be
    hacked. Also, many phone loke BB and IPhone have radios that can use
    these types of wireless signals. If you, for example, log into you
    local neighborhood's unsecured wireless, you take the risk that that
    person has a sniffer and is listening in and looking at your plain
    text data (ouch!). The same can happen at work, if the IT manager has
    a gateway device that logs usage (like an IP filter) he can usually
    track traffic back to your phone. But that all depends on the
    equipment that is in place.


    Miguel
    http://www.falconits.com
    Computer Service and Support






    >
    > "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >
    > news:%...
    >
    > > zz wrote:
    > >> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a regular
    > >> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using have
    > >> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless networks?
    > >> Thanks in advance.

    >
    > > You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you are
    > > connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.

    >
    > > Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    > > interact with a wireless network.

    >
    > > --
    > > Lem

    >
    > > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    > >http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html
     
    zz, Jan 14, 2010
    #8
  9. Hi
    When a telephone is used as a Modem the Tel. transmission to the Cell tower
    is Encrypted.
    However once it is fed to a regular computer what ever is going on between
    the computers is not any more Tel. activity it is regular WIFI, and thus as
    to be dealt with as mentioned in my previous post.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking).

    "zz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks also Miguel. Would tethering or use the 'phone as modem' feature
    > on the cell phone device on machine 'A' be detected from another different
    > machine 'B' wireless software monitor and be considered a rogue access
    > point even though machine 'A' like mentioned is using it's own cell phone
    > service's network plan only and not trying to enter the other machine 'B's
    > network?
    >
    >
    > "Falcon ITS" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > On Jan 12, 11:06 am, "zz" <> wrote:
    >> Thanks for the info Lem, appreciate it. Another newb question, can
    >> wireless
    >> network monitoring software then track one's wireless activity when say
    >> browsing the internet and sending/receiving personal emails from their
    >> own
    >> cell phone device with one's own cell phone carrier?

    >
    >
    > You cell phone can pick up two types of wireless :
    >
    > 1. The type that connects to cell phone towers (I think its GSM but
    > that's not my field). There are tools that just became available to
    > hack the sugnal which has been around since the 80's and is in need of
    > update. So, phone calls and data can be intercepted.
    >
    > 2. Wireless Frequency like B+G which you use to log into hotspots, or
    > home wireless routers also have encryption algorithms that can be
    > hacked. Also, many phone loke BB and IPhone have radios that can use
    > these types of wireless signals. If you, for example, log into you
    > local neighborhood's unsecured wireless, you take the risk that that
    > person has a sniffer and is listening in and looking at your plain
    > text data (ouch!). The same can happen at work, if the IT manager has
    > a gateway device that logs usage (like an IP filter) he can usually
    > track traffic back to your phone. But that all depends on the
    > equipment that is in place.
    >
    >
    > Miguel
    > http://www.falconits.com
    > Computer Service and Support
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>
    >> "Lem" <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:%...
    >>
    >> > zz wrote:
    >> >> Sorry newbie question, can wireless networks be detected from a
    >> >> regular
    >> >> wired 'grounded' network machine?...or does the machine your using
    >> >> have
    >> >> to be on a wireless network in order to detect other wireless
    >> >> networks?
    >> >> Thanks in advance.

    >>
    >> > You need a wireless adapter to detect wireless networks. Whether you
    >> > are
    >> > connected to a network, wired or wireless, is not relevant.

    >>
    >> > Wireless = radio. You need a radio receiver (and a transmitter) to
    >> > interact with a wireless network.

    >>
    >> > --
    >> > Lem

    >>
    >> > Apollo 11 - 40 years ago:
    >> >http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/apollo/40th/index.html

    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    Jack [MVP-Networking], Jan 14, 2010
    #9
  10. zz

    Falcon ITS Guest

    On Jan 13, 10:34 pm, "zz" <> wrote:
    > Thanks also Miguel.  Would tethering or use the 'phone as modem' feature on
    > the cell phone device on machine 'A' be detected from another different
    > machine 'B' wireless software monitor and be considered a rogue access point
    > even though machine 'A' like mentioned is using it's own cell phone
    > service's network plan only and not trying to enter the other machine 'B's
    > network?
    >



    Hello,

    Yes, GSM phone data and voice conversations can be intercepted and
    listened to / intercepted from tower to handset. It requires knowledge
    and the use of specialized equipment being place in close proximity to
    the handset.

    http://www.computerworld.com/s/arti...to_crack_encryption_for_next_gen_GSM_networks

    Anybody, anything can be hacked. How much effort/payoff is the
    question. Choose your paranoia level and plan accordingly.

    Miguel
    http://www.falconits.com
     
    Falcon ITS, Jan 25, 2010
    #10
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