Wireless security

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by C Tate, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    my hardware doesn't support WPA.

    I have one or two questions though.

    First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access the
    Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    prevent that happening?

    Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?

    Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    should this be the case?

    Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around each
    'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to my
    router and print server too?
     
    C Tate, Mar 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. C Tate

    James Gockel Guest

    Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.
    with WEP you've ecrypted the data that is transmitted in the air. And only
    those who know the key can decrypt or encrypt their own data to connect to
    the router. Thus they can not access the router because they must encrypt
    all the data that they send to the router.
    You must set up the security at the router first. Because if you don't the
    router doesnt know what to do, it only knows to leave everything insecure.
    Lastly, if you know the WEP key, and you know all the settings you do not
    need a stupid flash drive, and you can write it on a peice of paper and
    reset it up on a nother machine or wireless printer. because the flash drive
    settings will not work on a macintosh, it will not work on your wireless
    printer, and will not on anything but windows xp.

    I hope that helps a little. If not I will try and make it more explanitory.
    But it sounds like you are secure.
    -James G.

    "C Tate" <> wrote in message
    news:eSI%...
    >I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    >one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    >my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >
    > I have one or two questions though.
    >
    > First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    > the Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    > prevent that happening?
    >
    > Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    > Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >
    > Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    > didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    > had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    > should this be the case?
    >
    > Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    > each 'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings
    > to my router and print server too?
    >
     
    James Gockel, Mar 13, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. I had a similar issue when setting up my BT wireless router and became
    paranoid about security. A local expert told me the following -
    1. WEP at 128 bit security is fine for home applications.
    2. A hacker would need this and the network name (SSID). The configuration
    manager for the BT router enables the SSID to be "switched off" so no-one can
    see the name of your router.
    3. Use a good firewall. I use PCcillin on both desktop and laptop. This
    is virus scanner/firewall/e-mail scanner, etc. (XP firewall is switched
    off.)

    Peter C

    "C Tate" wrote:

    > I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    > one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    > my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >
    > I have one or two questions though.
    >
    > First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access the
    > Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    > prevent that happening?
    >
    > Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    > Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >
    > Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    > didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    > had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    > should this be the case?
    >
    > Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around each
    > 'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to my
    > router and print server too?
    >
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGV0ZXIgQw==?=, Mar 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Unfortunately, that is not correct. You'd be amazed at the growing
    number of WEP break ins to home networks and thefts of banking
    info/identity theft and more. WEP is not safe. In ANY environment.

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:50:45 -0800, "James Gockel"
    <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:

    >Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    >Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 14, 2006
    #4
  5. What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.

    On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    <> wrote:

    >I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    >one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    >my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >
    >I have one or two questions though.
    >
    >First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access the
    >Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >prevent that happening?
    >
    >Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    >Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >
    >Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    >had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >should this be the case?
    >
    >Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around each
    >'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to my
    >router and print server too?
    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 14, 2006
    #5
  6. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking wizard
    means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible. It's
    not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it. If
    I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    it's not that old.

    But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption mean
    people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at the
    moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key which
    is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're super!) so
    I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.


    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    >>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    >>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>
    >>I have one or two questions though.
    >>
    >>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    >>the
    >>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>prevent that happening?
    >>
    >>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    >>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>
    >>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    >>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>should this be the case?
    >>
    >>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>each
    >>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to my
    >>router and print server too?
    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    C Tate, Mar 14, 2006
    #6
  7. C Tate

    James Gockel Guest

    How would they steal banking info ? When you log onto your bank you have a
    secure connection right there. And if you're stupid enough to put your bank
    info in a text file or something else, then it's their own damn fault.
    WEP is safe for home environment, I have tried it myself, it can take weeks
    to months to get enough packets to break wep. And why would anyone bother
    trying to break wep when you can go down the block and find a unsecure
    network??? WEP is an excellent deturant.
    -James G.



    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Unfortunately, that is not correct. You'd be amazed at the growing
    > number of WEP break ins to home networks and thefts of banking
    > info/identity theft and more. WEP is not safe. In ANY environment.
    >
    > On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:50:45 -0800, "James Gockel"
    > <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:
    >
    >>Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    >>Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    James Gockel, Mar 14, 2006
    #7
  8. WEP can be broken in 3 minutes -
    Think about people that prepare tax returns and have those on their
    hard drives. with their Social Security #'s and other info. I'm not
    going to debate you further on this.

    On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 12:59:04 -0800, "James Gockel"
    <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:

    >How would they steal banking info ? When you log onto your bank you have a
    >secure connection right there. And if you're stupid enough to put your bank
    >info in a text file or something else, then it's their own damn fault.
    >WEP is safe for home environment, I have tried it myself, it can take weeks
    >to months to get enough packets to break wep. And why would anyone bother
    >trying to break wep when you can go down the block and find a unsecure
    >network??? WEP is an excellent deturant.
    >-James G.
    >
    >
    >
    >"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Unfortunately, that is not correct. You'd be amazed at the growing
    >> number of WEP break ins to home networks and thefts of banking
    >> info/identity theft and more. WEP is not safe. In ANY environment.
    >>
    >> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:50:45 -0800, "James Gockel"
    >> <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    >>>Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 14, 2006
    #8
  9. C Tate

    Mike G Guest

    Another opinion worth reading??? http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/index.php?p=43


    "James Gockel" <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > How would they steal banking info ? When you log onto your bank you have a
    > secure connection right there. And if you're stupid enough to put your
    > bank info in a text file or something else, then it's their own damn
    > fault.
    > WEP is safe for home environment, I have tried it myself, it can take
    > weeks to months to get enough packets to break wep. And why would anyone
    > bother trying to break wep when you can go down the block and find a
    > unsecure network??? WEP is an excellent deturant.
    > -James G.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Unfortunately, that is not correct. You'd be amazed at the growing
    >> number of WEP break ins to home networks and thefts of banking
    >> info/identity theft and more. WEP is not safe. In ANY environment.
    >>
    >> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:50:45 -0800, "James Gockel"
    >> <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    >>>Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >
    >
     
    Mike G, Mar 14, 2006
    #9
  10. can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    the wireless, including the driver name?

    as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    what are you using?

    On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    <> wrote:

    >I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking wizard
    >means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible. It's
    >not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it. If
    >I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    >it's not that old.
    >
    >But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption mean
    >people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at the
    >moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key which
    >is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're super!) so
    >I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >
    >
    >"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>
    >> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more just
    >>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because apparently
    >>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>
    >>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>
    >>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    >>>the
    >>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>prevent that happening?
    >>>
    >>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press 'connect'.
    >>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>
    >>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I actually
    >>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>>should this be the case?
    >>>
    >>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>>each
    >>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to my
    >>>router and print server too?
    >>>

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 14, 2006
    #10
  11. C Tate

    James Gockel Guest

    I'm not going to argue... but people need to know that WEP is ok for home
    use. I know personally that it can't be hacked by "mr. avarage war driving
    hacker" in 3 minutes... It's just not logical. Second, YES, wep is now
    considered by security community's as a deterant. Why would a hacker target
    a network with wep when he can go down the street to hack an unsecure one
    completely! Just as much as why would someone stealing stuff from luggage
    target one with a small little keylock when he can target one without a
    lock. Can that lock be broken, or ignored completly and the luggage ripped
    open OF COURSE, but it's still there to keep honest people honest... I mean
    who doesnt put a lock on their luggage?
    My last point, Dont use WEP! because it'll slow the network down anyway, and
    recduce your connection distance! If you can use other security methods, use
    em!

    Now everyone knows my view on wep. Don't use it, but it is secure enough...
    -James G.
    PS. Barb, show me one incident that has been reported publicly that
    someone's identity has been stolen because their home wifi network was
    compromised when they had WEP enabled. Just a simple link to a news artical.
    anything.




    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > WEP can be broken in 3 minutes -
    > Think about people that prepare tax returns and have those on their
    > hard drives. with their Social Security #'s and other info. I'm not
    > going to debate you further on this.
    >
    > On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 12:59:04 -0800, "James Gockel"
    > <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:
    >
    >>How would they steal banking info ? When you log onto your bank you have a
    >>secure connection right there. And if you're stupid enough to put your
    >>bank
    >>info in a text file or something else, then it's their own damn fault.
    >>WEP is safe for home environment, I have tried it myself, it can take
    >>weeks
    >>to months to get enough packets to break wep. And why would anyone bother
    >>trying to break wep when you can go down the block and find a unsecure
    >>network??? WEP is an excellent deturant.
    >>-James G.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Unfortunately, that is not correct. You'd be amazed at the growing
    >>> number of WEP break ins to home networks and thefts of banking
    >>> info/identity theft and more. WEP is not safe. In ANY environment.
    >>>
    >>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 14:50:45 -0800, "James Gockel"
    >>> <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Okay, some simple info, is that WEP for home environment is safe enough.
    >>>>Many people beleive otherwise. So don't worry about WPA.
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Barb Bowman
    >>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    James Gockel, Mar 15, 2006
    #11
  12. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a beginner.
    But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    information is listed:

    1) 1394 Net Adapter
    2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter

    The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking about (I
    think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2

    I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP bit, it
    says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).

    Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just want
    to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection to
    surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if you
    could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck with
    WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?

    Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot terms,
    what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!

    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    > the wireless, including the driver name?
    >
    > as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    > passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    > not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    > the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    > what are you using?
    >
    > On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking wizard
    >>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible. It's
    >>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it.
    >>If
    >>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    >>it's not that old.
    >>
    >>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>mean
    >>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>the
    >>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>which
    >>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're super!)
    >>so
    >>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>
    >>
    >>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>
    >>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>just
    >>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>apparently
    >>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>
    >>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>
    >>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    >>>>the
    >>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>
    >>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>'connect'.
    >>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>
    >>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>actually
    >>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>
    >>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>>>each
    >>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to
    >>>>my
    >>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Barb Bowman
    >>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    C Tate, Mar 15, 2006
    #12
  13. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    Incidentally I am not sure what a WZC is but I used the Netgear
    configuration screen to implement the WEP protection.
    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    > the wireless, including the driver name?
    >
    > as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    > passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    > not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    > the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    > what are you using?
    >
    > On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking wizard
    >>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible. It's
    >>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it.
    >>If
    >>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    >>it's not that old.
    >>
    >>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>mean
    >>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>the
    >>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>which
    >>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're super!)
    >>so
    >>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>
    >>
    >>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>
    >>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>just
    >>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>apparently
    >>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>
    >>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>
    >>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    >>>>the
    >>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>
    >>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>'connect'.
    >>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>
    >>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>actually
    >>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>
    >>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>>>each
    >>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to
    >>>>my
    >>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Barb Bowman
    >>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    C Tate, Mar 15, 2006
    #13
  14. IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -


    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    <> wrote:

    >I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a beginner.
    >But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >information is listed:
    >
    >1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >
    >The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking about (I
    >think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >
    >I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP bit, it
    >says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >
    >Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just want
    >to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection to
    >surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if you
    >could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck with
    >WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >
    >Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot terms,
    >what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >
    >"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>
    >> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    >> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    >> what are you using?
    >>
    >> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking wizard
    >>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible. It's
    >>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it.
    >>>If
    >>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    >>>it's not that old.
    >>>
    >>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>>mean
    >>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>>the
    >>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>>which
    >>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're super!)
    >>>so
    >>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>
    >>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>>just
    >>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>apparently
    >>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't access
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However, it
    >>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>actually
    >>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>>>>each
    >>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to
    >>>>>my
    >>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 15, 2006
    #14
  15. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is the
    best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    already got Service Pack 2 installed.

    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    > http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    > shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    > available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    > then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    > Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>beginner.
    >>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>information is listed:
    >>
    >>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>
    >>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking about
    >>(I
    >>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>
    >>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP bit,
    >>it
    >>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>
    >>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>want
    >>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection to
    >>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if you
    >>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck
    >>with
    >>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>
    >>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot terms,
    >>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>
    >>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>
    >>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    >>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    >>> what are you using?
    >>>
    >>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>wizard
    >>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>It's
    >>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports it.
    >>>>If
    >>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3 years,
    >>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>
    >>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>>>mean
    >>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>>>the
    >>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>>>which
    >>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>super!)
    >>>>so
    >>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>>>just
    >>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>access
    >>>>>>the
    >>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However,
    >>>>>>it
    >>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection. Why
    >>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried around
    >>>>>>each
    >>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings to
    >>>>>>my
    >>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Barb Bowman
    >>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    C Tate, Mar 15, 2006
    #15
  16. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    In fact, ignore that last question. I've just noticed the help files tell
    you how to do a system restore so I'll try that now. I don't know if you
    noticed my question about WHAT I will be protecting. Does the WPA protection
    stop people accessing my files AND stop them using my wireless broadbank?
    I'm still not clear.
    "C Tate" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is the
    > best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    > already got Service Pack 2 installed.
    >
    > "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    >> http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    >> shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    >> available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    >> then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    >> Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >>
    >>
    >> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>>beginner.
    >>>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>>information is listed:
    >>>
    >>>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >>>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>>
    >>>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking about
    >>>(I
    >>>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>>
    >>>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP bit,
    >>>it
    >>>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>>
    >>>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>>want
    >>>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection
    >>>to
    >>>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if you
    >>>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck
    >>>with
    >>>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>>
    >>>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot terms,
    >>>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>>
    >>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>>
    >>>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >>>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    >>>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    >>>> what are you using?
    >>>>
    >>>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>>wizard
    >>>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>>It's
    >>>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports
    >>>>>it.
    >>>>>If
    >>>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3
    >>>>>years,
    >>>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>>>>mean
    >>>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>>>>the
    >>>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>>>>which
    >>>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>>super!)
    >>>>>so
    >>>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:...
    >>>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>>>>just
    >>>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>>access
    >>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However,
    >>>>>>>it
    >>>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>Why
    >>>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried
    >>>>>>>around
    >>>>>>>each
    >>>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings
    >>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>my
    >>>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >
    >
     
    C Tate, Mar 15, 2006
    #16
  17. see if
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05february10.mspx
    answers some of your questions.



    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 22:59:36 -0000, "C Tate"
    <> wrote:

    >In fact, ignore that last question. I've just noticed the help files tell
    >you how to do a system restore so I'll try that now. I don't know if you
    >noticed my question about WHAT I will be protecting. Does the WPA protection
    >stop people accessing my files AND stop them using my wireless broadbank?
    >I'm still not clear.
    >"C Tate" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is the
    >> best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    >> already got Service Pack 2 installed.
    >>
    >> "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    >>> http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    >>> shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    >>> available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    >>> then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    >>> Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>> <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>>>beginner.
    >>>>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>>>information is listed:
    >>>>
    >>>>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>>>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >>>>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>>>
    >>>>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking about
    >>>>(I
    >>>>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>>>
    >>>>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP bit,
    >>>>it
    >>>>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>>>
    >>>>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>>>want
    >>>>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>>>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection
    >>>>to
    >>>>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if you
    >>>>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck
    >>>>with
    >>>>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>>>
    >>>>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot terms,
    >>>>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>>>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>>>
    >>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>news:...
    >>>>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>>>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>>>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >>>>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part of
    >>>>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or just
    >>>>> what are you using?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>>>wizard
    >>>>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>>>It's
    >>>>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports
    >>>>>>it.
    >>>>>>If
    >>>>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3
    >>>>>>years,
    >>>>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA encryption
    >>>>>>mean
    >>>>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP at
    >>>>>>the
    >>>>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round and
    >>>>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking key
    >>>>>>which
    >>>>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>>>super!)
    >>>>>>so
    >>>>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's more
    >>>>>>>>just
    >>>>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>>>access
    >>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do I
    >>>>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection. However,
    >>>>>>>>it
    >>>>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>Why
    >>>>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried
    >>>>>>>>around
    >>>>>>>>each
    >>>>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings
    >>>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>>my
    >>>>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Barb Bowman
    >>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >>
    >>

    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 16, 2006
    #17
  18. C Tate

    C Tate Guest

    Hurrah! I am now WPA protected! I successfully installed the driver and it
    all seems to work fine. I read your article too. It was very useful BUT I
    still don't understand if this this new protection will stop by-passers
    trying to surf my broadband connection.

    "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > see if
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05february10.mspx
    > answers some of your questions.
    >
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 22:59:36 -0000, "C Tate"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>In fact, ignore that last question. I've just noticed the help files tell
    >>you how to do a system restore so I'll try that now. I don't know if you
    >>noticed my question about WHAT I will be protecting. Does the WPA
    >>protection
    >>stop people accessing my files AND stop them using my wireless broadbank?
    >>I'm still not clear.
    >>"C Tate" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is
    >>> the
    >>> best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    >>> already got Service Pack 2 installed.
    >>>
    >>> "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    >>>> http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    >>>> shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    >>>> available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    >>>> then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    >>>> Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>>>>beginner.
    >>>>>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>>>>information is listed:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>>>>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >>>>>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>>>>
    >>>>>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking
    >>>>>about
    >>>>>(I
    >>>>>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP
    >>>>>bit,
    >>>>>it
    >>>>>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>>>>want
    >>>>>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>>>>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection
    >>>>>to
    >>>>>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if
    >>>>>you
    >>>>>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck
    >>>>>with
    >>>>>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot
    >>>>>terms,
    >>>>>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>>>>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>news:...
    >>>>>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>>>>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>>>>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >>>>>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part
    >>>>>> of
    >>>>>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or
    >>>>>> just
    >>>>>> what are you using?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>>>>wizard
    >>>>>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>>>>It's
    >>>>>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports
    >>>>>>>it.
    >>>>>>>If
    >>>>>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3
    >>>>>>>years,
    >>>>>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA
    >>>>>>>encryption
    >>>>>>>mean
    >>>>>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP
    >>>>>>>at
    >>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round
    >>>>>>>and
    >>>>>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking
    >>>>>>>key
    >>>>>>>which
    >>>>>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>>>>super!)
    >>>>>>>so
    >>>>>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's
    >>>>>>>>>more
    >>>>>>>>>just
    >>>>>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>>>>access
    >>>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do
    >>>>>>>>>I
    >>>>>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>However,
    >>>>>>>>>it
    >>>>>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>Why
    >>>>>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried
    >>>>>>>>>around
    >>>>>>>>>each
    >>>>>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings
    >>>>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>>>my
    >>>>>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>
    >>>

    >>

    > --
    >
    > Barb Bowman
    > MS Windows-MVP
    > Expert Zone Columnist
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    > http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    C Tate, Mar 16, 2006
    #18
  19. C Tate

    James Gockel Guest

    They must have the key in order to connect. They can't just hop on now if
    you have wpa or wep security's in place.
    -James G.

    "C Tate" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hurrah! I am now WPA protected! I successfully installed the driver and it
    > all seems to work fine. I read your article too. It was very useful BUT I
    > still don't understand if this this new protection will stop by-passers
    > trying to surf my broadband connection.
    >
    > "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> see if
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05february10.mspx
    >> answers some of your questions.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 22:59:36 -0000, "C Tate"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In fact, ignore that last question. I've just noticed the help files tell
    >>>you how to do a system restore so I'll try that now. I don't know if you
    >>>noticed my question about WHAT I will be protecting. Does the WPA
    >>>protection
    >>>stop people accessing my files AND stop them using my wireless broadbank?
    >>>I'm still not clear.
    >>>"C Tate" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is
    >>>> the
    >>>> best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    >>>> already got Service Pack 2 installed.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    >>>>> http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    >>>>> shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    >>>>> available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    >>>>> then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    >>>>> Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>>>>>beginner.
    >>>>>>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>>>>>information is listed:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>>>>>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX
    >>>>>>Compatible)
    >>>>>>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking
    >>>>>>about
    >>>>>>(I
    >>>>>>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP
    >>>>>>bit,
    >>>>>>it
    >>>>>>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>>>>>want
    >>>>>>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>>>>>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband
    >>>>>>connection
    >>>>>>to
    >>>>>>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if
    >>>>>>you
    >>>>>>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm
    >>>>>>stuck
    >>>>>>with
    >>>>>>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot
    >>>>>>terms,
    >>>>>>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>>>>>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>>>>>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>>>>>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility
    >>>>>>> and
    >>>>>>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part
    >>>>>>> of
    >>>>>>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or
    >>>>>>> just
    >>>>>>> what are you using?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>>>>>wizard
    >>>>>>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>>>>>It's
    >>>>>>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports
    >>>>>>>>it.
    >>>>>>>>If
    >>>>>>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3
    >>>>>>>>years,
    >>>>>>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA
    >>>>>>>>encryption
    >>>>>>>>mean
    >>>>>>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP
    >>>>>>>>at
    >>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round
    >>>>>>>>and
    >>>>>>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking
    >>>>>>>>key
    >>>>>>>>which
    >>>>>>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>>>>>super!)
    >>>>>>>>so
    >>>>>>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's
    >>>>>>>>>>more
    >>>>>>>>>>just
    >>>>>>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>>>>>access
    >>>>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how
    >>>>>>>>>>do I
    >>>>>>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>>However,
    >>>>>>>>>>it
    >>>>>>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>>Why
    >>>>>>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried
    >>>>>>>>>>around
    >>>>>>>>>>each
    >>>>>>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these
    >>>>>>>>>>settings
    >>>>>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>>>>my
    >>>>>>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >
    >
     
    James Gockel, Mar 16, 2006
    #19
  20. WPA keys can't be sniffed like WEP. Only dictionary attacks can be
    used to break in. If you used a good long random pass phrase, you
    should be fine since passers by won't be able to connect.


    On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 22:41:24 -0000, "C Tate"
    <> wrote:

    >Hurrah! I am now WPA protected! I successfully installed the driver and it
    >all seems to work fine. I read your article too. It was very useful BUT I
    >still don't understand if this this new protection will stop by-passers
    >trying to surf my broadband connection.
    >
    >"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> see if
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/bowman_05february10.mspx
    >> answers some of your questions.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 22:59:36 -0000, "C Tate"
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In fact, ignore that last question. I've just noticed the help files tell
    >>>you how to do a system restore so I'll try that now. I don't know if you
    >>>noticed my question about WHAT I will be protecting. Does the WPA
    >>>protection
    >>>stop people accessing my files AND stop them using my wireless broadbank?
    >>>I'm still not clear.
    >>>"C Tate" <> wrote in message
    >>>news:...
    >>>> Ok. Thanks, I'll try this. Sorry to ask so many questions but what is
    >>>> the
    >>>> best place to find out about doing a 'system restore checkpoint'? I've
    >>>> already got Service Pack 2 installed.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>> IBM uses the same wireless card in some of their laptops
    >>>>> http://www-307.ibm.com/pc/support/site.wss/document.do?lndocid=MIGR-59438
    >>>>> shows that there is a driver that supports WPA-PSK So the driver is
    >>>>> available. If you are brave, first do a system restore checkpoint and
    >>>>> then try this driver. You will need to make sure you have XP Service
    >>>>> Pack 2 installed and you will need to change settings in the router -
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 00:44:34 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I'm not sure this is all the info you've asked for - I'm really a
    >>>>>>beginner.
    >>>>>>But here goes. Under Network Adapters in device manager the following
    >>>>>>information is listed:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>1) 1394 Net Adapter
    >>>>>>2) 3com 3c920 Integrated Fast Ethernet Controller (3c905-TX Compatible)
    >>>>>>3) Intel(R)PRO/Wireless LAN 2100 3B Mini PCI Adapter
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>The driver associated with number (3), which is what you are asking
    >>>>>>about
    >>>>>>(I
    >>>>>>think?!) is Intel, date 11/1/2003 version 1.0.28.2
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>I am using a Netgear Wireless Firewall Router DG834G. Under the WEP
    >>>>>>bit,
    >>>>>>it
    >>>>>>says the encryption is 64 bit (automatic).
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Hope that information helps. I am very confused about all this. I just
    >>>>>>want
    >>>>>>to make sure my files are protected, nobody can surf the net using my
    >>>>>>broadband and that I CAN let another laptop use my broadband connection
    >>>>>>to
    >>>>>>surf, if desired. If you think I can get WPA I'd be very grateful if
    >>>>>>you
    >>>>>>could let me know what I need to do or change. If I can't and I'm stuck
    >>>>>>with
    >>>>>>WEP, are there any configuration changes I should make?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>Finallly, I'd really appreciate it if you could tell me, in idiot
    >>>>>>terms,
    >>>>>>what exactly I have protected? Is it the files on my PC, my internet
    >>>>>>connection or both? Sorry to appear so dumb!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>> can you look in device manager and tell me everything it says about
    >>>>>>> the wireless, including the driver name?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> as for your friend, not all wireless utilities support WEP
    >>>>>>> passphrases. it sounds like you are using a manufacturers utility and
    >>>>>>> not the built in WZC to manage your network, which may also be part
    >>>>>>> of
    >>>>>>> the reason you don't have WPA. are you using a 128 bit hex key or
    >>>>>>> just
    >>>>>>> what are you using?
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> On Tue, 14 Mar 2006 19:07:25 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>I've got a Samsung X10 laptop (Centrino). I think the XP networking
    >>>>>>>>wizard
    >>>>>>>>means that the laptop inbuilt wireless adapter isn't WPA compatible.
    >>>>>>>>It's
    >>>>>>>>not the router anyway as its documentation suggests that it supports
    >>>>>>>>it.
    >>>>>>>>If
    >>>>>>>>I am correct I am a bit surprised. I've only had my laptop 2 or 3
    >>>>>>>>years,
    >>>>>>>>it's not that old.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>But Barb, I'm still not clear, does using either WEP or WPA
    >>>>>>>>encryption
    >>>>>>>>mean
    >>>>>>>>people can't surf the net using MY broadband? And, as I AM using WEP
    >>>>>>>>at
    >>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>moment, what is this key I've got to enter if my friend comes round
    >>>>>>>>and
    >>>>>>>>wants to use my network? Is it the passphrase or the funny looking
    >>>>>>>>key
    >>>>>>>>which
    >>>>>>>>is generated? I've read some of your articles by the way (they're
    >>>>>>>>super!)
    >>>>>>>>so
    >>>>>>>>I do realise that WEP isn't as secure as WPA.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>"Barb Bowman MVP-Windows" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>>>news:...
    >>>>>>>>> What hardware do you have? WEP is not safe.
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> On Mon, 13 Mar 2006 22:09:28 -0000, "C Tate"
    >>>>>>>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>I have been trying to secure my wireless network. Actually it's
    >>>>>>>>>>more
    >>>>>>>>>>just
    >>>>>>>>>>one laptop and a broadband connection. I had to use WEP because
    >>>>>>>>>>apparently
    >>>>>>>>>>my hardware doesn't support WPA.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>I have one or two questions though.
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>First, what exactly have I protected? Does this mean people can't
    >>>>>>>>>>access
    >>>>>>>>>>the
    >>>>>>>>>>Internet via my broadband? Or is that still possible? If so, how do
    >>>>>>>>>>I
    >>>>>>>>>>prevent that happening?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Second, I am not clear what I am supposed to enter when I press
    >>>>>>>>>>'connect'.
    >>>>>>>>>>Is it the passphrase I used or the key which was generated?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Third, I initially used Windows XP to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>>However,
    >>>>>>>>>>it
    >>>>>>>>>>didn't seem to work. My network still appeared as 'unsecured'. I
    >>>>>>>>>>actually
    >>>>>>>>>>had to change the settings in the router to enable the protection.
    >>>>>>>>>>Why
    >>>>>>>>>>should this be the case?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>>>Finally, the XP wizard suggested the settings had to be carried
    >>>>>>>>>>around
    >>>>>>>>>>each
    >>>>>>>>>>'device' using a flash drive. Am I supposed to carry these settings
    >>>>>>>>>>to
    >>>>>>>>>>my
    >>>>>>>>>>router and print server too?
    >>>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> --
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Barb Bowman
    >>>>> MS Windows-MVP
    >>>>> Expert Zone Columnist
    >>>>> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >>>>> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>

    >> --
    >>
    >> Barb Bowman
    >> MS Windows-MVP
    >> Expert Zone Columnist
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    >> http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/

    >

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    Expert Zone Columnist
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman MVP-Windows, Mar 17, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

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