wireless security tools

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by goldtech@worldpost.com, May 6, 2007.

  1. Guest

    I am using a friend's wireless hub. He was kind enough to give to
    allow me - of course it's protected - I need passwords to access...

    But I'm concerned that he has a proxy or something that all my web
    surfing must "funnel" through - and that he could track my web
    surfing...

    Is there any way to ensure privacy? It seems like it would difficult
    because I wirelessly connect to his hub and his ISP...

    Is there a way I could at least ping or use another tool to find out
    as mush as possible about my hookup/environment - must be a passive
    "kind and nice" tool...

    Thanks
     
    , May 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. nemo_outis Guest

    wrote in news:1178463232.762640.166850
    @p77g2000hsh.googlegroups.com:

    > I am using a friend's wireless hub. He was kind enough to give to
    > allow me - of course it's protected - I need passwords to access...
    >
    > But I'm concerned that he has a proxy or something that all my web
    > surfing must "funnel" through - and that he could track my web
    > surfing...
    >
    > Is there any way to ensure privacy? It seems like it would difficult
    > because I wirelessly connect to his hub and his ISP...
    >
    > Is there a way I could at least ping or use another tool to find out
    > as mush as possible about my hookup/environment - must be a passive
    > "kind and nice" tool...
    >
    > Thanks
    >



    Tunnel encrypted through his system to a remote proxy and thence to the
    internet. Tor is probably the easiest and most secure way, albeit a tad
    slow.

    A pay service such as cotse works faster and more conveniently (but, of
    course, that only "displaces" the problem of trust from your friend to
    cotse).

    Regards,

    PS You can also look for free proxies out there that accept encrypted
    links. They're scarce and tend to be flaky, intermittent, and slow, but
    they do exist. And the trust problem, in one form otr another, may remain
    unless you go to great lengths to chain proxies, etc. (in which case Tor is
    easier, more secure, and probably just as fast).
     
    nemo_outis, May 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Leythos Guest

    On Sun, 06 May 2007 07:53:52 -0700, goldtech wrote:

    > I am using a friend's wireless hub. He was kind enough to give to allow
    > me - of course it's protected - I need passwords to access...
    >
    > But I'm concerned that he has a proxy or something that all my web
    > surfing must "funnel" through - and that he could track my web
    > surfing...
    >
    > Is there any way to ensure privacy? It seems like it would difficult
    > because I wirelessly connect to his hub and his ISP...
    >
    > Is there a way I could at least ping or use another tool to find out as
    > mush as possible about my hookup/environment - must be a passive "kind
    > and nice" tool...


    He doesn't need a proxy, most NAT Routers provide logging, so he can see
    your address on his LAN and any address that you connect to.

    If you don't want friends to know what you are doing then you need to get
    your own internet service.


    --
    Leythos
    Igitur qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum.
    Calling an illegal alien an "undocumented worker" is like calling
    a drug dealer an "unlicensed pharmacist"
    (remove 999 for proper email address)
     
    Leythos, May 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Todd H. Guest

    writes:

    > I am using a friend's wireless hub. He was kind enough to give to
    > allow me - of course it's protected - I need passwords to access...
    >
    > But I'm concerned that he has a proxy or something that all my web
    > surfing must "funnel" through - and that he could track my web
    > surfing...


    Yup.

    > Is there any way to ensure privacy?


    VPN into somewhere else, and use somewhere else's DNS servers is
    pretty much it.

    > It seems like it would difficult because I wirelessly connect to his
    > hub and his ISP...
    >
    > Is there a way I could at least ping or use another tool to find out
    > as mush as possible about my hookup/environment - must be a passive
    > "kind and nice" tool...


    If he's using a transparent proxy or passively sniffing DNS requests
    somewhere, he'll be able to see what you're doing if you're not using
    a VPN, and there'll be pretty much no way to detect such monitoring.

    If he's nice enough to give you access, he's a good enough friend to
    know your pr0n surfing habits right?


    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/
     
    Todd H., May 6, 2007
    #4
  5. macarro Guest

    You can use Steganos VPN:

    http://www.steganos.com

    But it's not free, I don't know of any free VPN and I don't see why any
    company would provide it as it costs money and bandwidth.
     
    macarro, May 8, 2007
    #5
  6. nemo_outis Guest

    macarro <> wrote in news:4641918b$1$47153
    $:

    >
    > You can use Steganos VPN:
    >
    > http://www.steganos.com
    >
    > But it's not free, I don't know of any free VPN and I don't see why any
    > company would provide it as it costs money and bandwidth.
    >
    >


    OpenVPN It's arguably better and certainly easier than Ipsec or pptp.
    And it's open-source and free.

    Unless you're an uber-geek it will take most of a Saturday afternoon to
    master it, but it will be an afternoon well spent. OpenVPN is particularly
    good for road warriors (e.g., it can easily be used from a notebook in a
    hotel room tunnelling past any eavesdropper - try that with most other
    VPNs) It also punches through most corporate firewalls very nicely
    (forward or reverse).

    http://sourceforge.net/projects/openvpn/

    Regards,

    PS Also check out http://openvpn.net/ and
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenVPN
     
    nemo_outis, May 9, 2007
    #6
  7. Sebastian G. Guest

    macarro wrote:

    > You can use Steganos VPN:
    >
    > http://www.steganos.com
    >
    > But it's not free,



    and not secure either. So why should anyone use it?
     
    Sebastian G., May 10, 2007
    #7
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