Wireless security follow-up

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Joe J., Jul 31, 2008.

  1. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless security
    on my router and need some help.

    Option 1 is WEP
    If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type of
    Hex or Ascii.
    I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
    What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many? Eight
    also?
    Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
    new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.

    Thanks,
    Joe J
     
    Joe J., Jul 31, 2008
    #1
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  2. Joe J.

    Boscoe Guest

    "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:dPikk.34407$...
    > Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
    > security on my router and need some help.
    >
    > Option 1 is WEP
    > If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
    > of Hex or Ascii.
    > I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
    > What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
    > Eight also?
    > Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
    > new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Joe J



    *Do not use WEP*

    WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies on
    a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
    Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting network
    traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the data
    packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key. WEP
    encryption can also be actively hacked, using ‘brute force’ and ‘dictionary
    attack’ methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts whilst remaining
    undetected by simulating normal network activity.
     
    Boscoe, Jul 31, 2008
    #2
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  3. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    "Boscoe" <> wrote in message
    news:HVkkk.35541$...
    >
    > "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    > news:dPikk.34407$...
    >> Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
    >> security on my router and need some help.
    >>
    >> Option 1 is WEP
    >> If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
    >> of Hex or Ascii.
    >> I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
    >> What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
    >> Eight also?
    >> Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me.
    >> It's new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Joe J

    >
    >
    > *Do not use WEP*
    >
    > WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies
    > on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
    > Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting network
    > traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the data
    > packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key. WEP
    > encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
    > 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
    > whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
    >

    My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a "passphrase".
    Another name to picking a password?

    Joe J
     
    Joe J., Jul 31, 2008
    #3
  4. Joe J.

    Boscoe Guest

    "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:NBlkk.17784$...
    >>
    >> *Do not use WEP*
    >>
    >> WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption relies
    >> on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a 26-bit key.
    >> Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting
    >> network traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses the
    >> data packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a key.
    >> WEP encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
    >> 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
    >> whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
    >>

    > My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a "passphrase".
    > Another name to picking a password?
    >
    > Joe J


    WPA employs two types of security key: TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
    Protocol) creates a new key every time a PC or device logs onto the network,
    making it almost impossible for it to be guessed or cracked.

    WPA also uses a variation of the shared key system (WPA-PSK), which can be
    used on older set-ups that do not fully support all WPA features.

    Usually all you have to do is make sure the encryption mode is set to WPA
    ‘Personal’ or ‘PSK’ (Pre Shared Key) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
    Protocol) then enter your passphrase in the box. Note it down and keep it
    somewhere safe. Once again when you have finished click Save or OK and exit
    the router setup.
     
    Boscoe, Jul 31, 2008
    #4
  5. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    "Boscoe" <> wrote in message
    news:Vknkk.35644$...
    >
    > "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    > news:NBlkk.17784$...
    >>>
    >>> *Do not use WEP*
    >>>
    >>> WEP security has two standard encryption levels: 64-bit encryption
    >>> relies on a 40-bit key. The slightly stronger 128-bit level uses a
    >>> 26-bit key.
    >>> Both levels are relatively easy to crack by passively intercepting
    >>> network traffic on a Wi-Fi equipped laptop. Hacking software analyses
    >>> the data packets, looking for repetitive patterns, which can reveal a
    >>> key. WEP encryption can also be actively hacked, using 'brute force' and
    >>> 'dictionary attack' methods, bombarding the system with log-on attempts
    >>> whilst remaining undetected by simulating normal network activity.
    >>>

    >> My other option is WPA-PSK. If I check that one, it wants a
    >> "passphrase". Another name to picking a password?
    >>
    >> Joe J

    >
    > WPA employs two types of security key: TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
    > Protocol) creates a new key every time a PC or device logs onto the
    > network, making it almost impossible for it to be guessed or cracked.
    >
    > WPA also uses a variation of the shared key system (WPA-PSK), which can be
    > used on older set-ups that do not fully support all WPA features.
    >
    > Usually all you have to do is make sure the encryption mode is set to WPA
    > 'Personal' or 'PSK' (Pre Shared Key) and TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity
    > Protocol) then enter your passphrase in the box. Note it down and keep it
    > somewhere safe. Once again when you have finished click Save or OK and
    > exit the router setup.
    >

    The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup the
    WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
    It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
    moment.

    Joe J
     
    Joe J., Jul 31, 2008
    #5
  6. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    "Tee Jay" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >>>

    >> The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup the
    >> WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
    >> It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
    >> moment.
    >>
    >> Joe J

    >
    > You enter 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.0.1 in Internet Browser Address Bar.
    > (Depends on who manufactured your router.) This gets you into Router
    > Setup. and go tho the Wireless section to set security.
    > Tee Jay


    That part I understand and am ready to do. Where in the desktop machine, in
    xp-pro. do I input the WPA password that I am about to enter into the
    router?
     
    Joe J., Aug 1, 2008
    #6
  7. "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:dPikk.34407$...
    > Following the advice given here I am trying to enable the wireless
    > security on my router and need some help.
    >
    > Option 1 is WEP
    > If I select WEP then I have the option of 64bit or 128bit, then key type
    > of Hex or Ascii.
    > I'm assuming hex is 8 of something. Is it just numbers?
    > What is ascii then? A combination of letters and numbers? How many?
    > Eight also?
    > Sorry if these are basic and dumb questions, don't jump all over me. It's
    > new to me and the Kyocera manual isn't very helpful.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Joe J
    >


    You want WEP.
    Hex is a numbering scheme where each digit can be a value of 0-9, plus a-f.
    This gives each digit a range of 16 possible choices, which fits well in the
    4-bit binary scheme.

    The default password is probably the MAC address printed on the device. You
    can leave it at that, or make it a string that is meaningful to you. You
    will be constrained to "0123456789abcdef" for the character choices, and you
    have to use 10 digits.

    You want to know where to find the default password because this is what it
    will revert to if you ever have to reset the router.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Aug 1, 2008
    #7
  8. Joe J.

    Boscoe Guest

    "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:gIDkk.15979$...
    >
    > "Tee Jay" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >>>>
    >>> The wireless set-up is on a desktop running XP-Pro. Where do I setup
    >>> the WPA, password etc.. on the desktop?
    >>> It is currently working but there is no security on the router at the
    >>> moment.
    >>>
    >>> Joe J

    >>
    >> You enter 192.168.0.0 or 192.168.0.1 in Internet Browser Address Bar.
    >> (Depends on who manufactured your router.) This gets you into Router
    >> Setup. and go tho the Wireless section to set security.
    >> Tee Jay

    >
    > That part I understand and am ready to do. Where in the desktop machine,
    > in xp-pro. do I input the WPA password that I am about to enter into the
    > router?


    All you need to do is enable the encryption systems on the router and the
    client PCs. Go to the router’s configuration menu. However, before you do
    anything make sure that all of the PCs, other than the one used to configure
    the router, are switched off. After logging on to the router you select
    the Wireless Security menu and there should be a button, switch or drop-down
    menu for enabling encryption and selecting WPA mode. After entering your
    passphrase click Save or OK and exit the setup menu.

    Reboot the router and PC and make sure that your Internet connection is
    still live. Switch on the first of your wireless ‘client’ PCs. Double-click
    the Wi-Fi configuration manager icon in the System Tray, this should show
    that you have a good signal but you may get an error message saying it is
    unable to connect or that you need to enter a key or passphrase.

    On some setup utilities you may have to switch tabs to display an encryption
    mode drop-down menu and key or passphrase entry box. Either way the object
    of the exercise is to enter your key passphrase, click Save or OK and within
    a few seconds the connection should be made.
     
    Boscoe, Aug 1, 2008
    #8
  9. Joe J.

    Guest

    On Jul 31, 2:08 pm, "Joe J." <> wrote:
    > <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>


    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI

    ;-)
     
    , Aug 2, 2008
    #9
  10. Joe J.

    Joe J. Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Jul 31, 2:08 pm, "Joe J." <> wrote:
    > <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>


    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI

    GROAN!!

    ;-)
     
    Joe J., Aug 2, 2008
    #10
  11. Joe J.

    Guest

    On Aug 2, 11:50 pm, "Joe J." <> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > On Jul 31, 2:08 pm, "Joe J." <> wrote:
    >
    > >  <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>

    >
    > ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI
    >
    > GROAN!!
    >
    > ;-)


    PUTTING ASIDE YOUR WIRELESS ROUTER.

    ASCII is an ancient thing, far older than wireless.

    If you had even looked at google images for ASCII
    http://game-editor.com/tutorials/images/ascii.jpg

    Does that look like just letters and digits to you?


    If you had google ascii, and clicked on the first page
    (A VERY VEYR USEFUL SITE BY THE WAY - for some)
    You would have seen a big picture comes up.

    Is that just letters and digits?
    http://www.asciitable.com/

    You're clearly not a serious customer.

    As far as wireless routers are concerned. I have set them up many
    times but I don't use them myself. Why don't you try entering
    different characters and see if it works. But try just letters first.

    Infact.
    WEP is not very secure anyway.

    Infact, any google of WEP will tell you that.

    You know how many idiots are trying to set up routers. Idiots who know
    nothing technical. You think you won't find anything online googling
    how to set it up?

    Why don't you call your router people, call your modem people. They
    have tech support that are experts in dealing with idiots, and they
    can sometimes deal with techies too Infact, alot of techies learn
    how to do it by calling them and seeing how they troubleshoot it.
    The person that calls the techie round is too stupid to even talk to
    the router people.. But if you'r're not calling somebody around.. I
    can tell you that the people on the end of the telephone of your
    router company, will be able to give you the specific help you need to
    set the thing up.

    You clearly don't want to know what ASCII is . You didn't even google
    it, you lazy bastard!!! You untechnical baffoon.. Don't worry, most
    people are untechnical baffoons, but don't ask technical questions
    then. Ask functional questions.

    Don't ask why is a door open. Ask what to do about it. You can always
    think about Why afterwards.. Anyhow, often people who can deal with it
    don't know all the "why"s, just the problems and solutions, and
    sometimes it's right to not care about the whys e.g. an obscure
    windows crash. In this case you ask a valuable technical question but
    you couldn't be bothered to google, because it's basic and valuable
    enough that it's been explained a million times. Even a picture on the
    first link and most links answered your question. You illogical lazy
    untechnical bafooon
     
    , Aug 3, 2008
    #11
  12. "Joe J." <> wrote in message
    news:zw5lk.32261$...
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > On Jul 31, 2:08 pm, "Joe J." <> wrote:
    >> <snip> What is ascii then? <snip>

    >
    > ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI
    >
    > GROAN!!
    >


    Don't I feel stupid! It took me far to long to get that one.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Aug 3, 2008
    #12
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