Wireless router with easiest to configure parental controls?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours

    Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?

    I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    would be more impressive is if it actually worked.

    I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought the
    equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it, and
    start over again.

    But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    btw) I am still left pondering.

    There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>

    I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again. Newegg
    suggests these other fine manufacturers:

    Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    Asus
    Trendnet
    TP-Link (never heard of them)
    Belkin
    Buffalo Technology
    Encore (them neither)
    SMC
    Zonet
    Zoom
    ZyXel

    So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.

    TIA

    mr curious
     
    ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010
    #1
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  2. ng_reader

    Mike Easter Guest

    ng_reader wrote:
    Subject: Wireless router with easiest to configure parental controls?

    > Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >
    > Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?


    Such target goals are not necessarily best achieved by the router.

    What are the age/s of the subjects/children whose online activities you
    are considering controlling with a router? How many machines are
    involved? Which operating systems?

    > I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    > would be more impressive is if it actually worked.


    You have exactly which D-Link model number?



    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 22, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. ng_reader

    XS11E Guest

    ng_reader <> wrote:

    > Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >
    > Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >
    > I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive,
    > what would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >
    > I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just
    > bought the equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work,
    > chuck it, and start over again.


    Good wireless routers are not that expensive, I have a Linksys that
    cost me $20 used and a Netgear that was $27 refurbished.

    > There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered
    > router called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in
    > that. Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>


    Tried similar on the Linksys, reverted back to stock firmware.
    It gave me more control after a very long learning cycle.

    > I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.
    > Newegg suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >
    > Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router


    I like my Linksys and my Netgear. FWIW I find the Netgear a little
    easier to configure BUT...... I don't believe any router will do what
    you want.


    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    XS11E, Sep 22, 2010
    #3
  4. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest


    >
    > I like my Linksys and my Netgear. FWIW I find the Netgear a little
    > easier to configure BUT...... I don't believe any router will do what
    > you want.
    >
    >


    Sadly I think you may be right. Now, calling the good folks at Cisco
    home networking they firmly deny your statement. However, their
    credibility evaporated the moment they tried to hard sell me on making a
    decision to buy "right now".

    I think at the very least I should be able to limit which websites my
    router will pass through given certain time restraints.

    I am dealing with student age children here and the public schools have
    gone whole hog on wikispaces. That, for instance, would be one of the
    allowed websites.

    I can't say enough good things about OpenDNS, however. It has likely
    saved me countless hours of rebuilding kid's machines...
     
    ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010
    #4
  5. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest

    Hi Mike,

    Thank-you for your active participation on this newsgroup.

    It's a DIR-615 from D-Link. IF the rules I created for turning off
    wireless don't work (and I think I tried every single permutation
    conceivable) I don't think much more is going to work on this device.

    I don't think I can get onto those machines but if I could they would be
    Vista, 7, XP. 3 machines 3 OSs. Likely more later.

    There was a neat little utility I used on the babysitter when they were
    younger (put on my machine) that not only provided keystroke capture but
    screen capture. But again, I'd like to trust them when I can, but limit
    my exposure where I can.

    On 9/22/2010 11:35 AM, Mike Easter wrote:
    > ng_reader wrote:
    > Subject: Wireless router with easiest to configure parental controls?
    >
    >> Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >>
    >> Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?

    >
    > Such target goals are not necessarily best achieved by the router.
    >
    > What are the age/s of the subjects/children whose online activities you
    > are considering controlling with a router? How many machines are
    > involved? Which operating systems?
    >
    >> I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    >> would be more impressive is if it actually worked.

    >
    > You have exactly which D-Link model number?
    >
    >
    >
     
    ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010
    #5
  6. ng_reader

    John Holmes Guest

    ng_reader "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    > Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >
    > Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >
    > I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    > would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >
    > I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought the
    > equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it, and
    > start over again.
    >
    > But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    > someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    > btw) I am still left pondering.
    >
    > There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    > called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    > Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>
    >
    > I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.

    Newegg
    > suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >
    > Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    > Asus
    > Trendnet
    > TP-Link (never heard of them)
    > Belkin
    > Buffalo Technology
    > Encore (them neither)
    > SMC
    > Zonet
    > Zoom
    > ZyXel
    >
    > So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    > company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    > really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > mr curious


    I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't obey me
    I break their fucking fingers.

    Works great. No routers with parental control needed.

    --
    <snip>
     
    John Holmes, Sep 22, 2010
    #6
  7. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest


    >>
    >> mr curious

    >
    > I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't obey me
    > I break their fucking fingers.
    >
    > Works great. No routers with parental control needed.
    >


    Tactically good idea. But what do do when you run out of fingers?
     
    ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010
    #7
  8. ng_reader

    Mike Easter Guest

    ng_reader wrote:

    > It's a DIR-615 from D-Link. IF the rules I created for turning off
    > wireless don't work (and I think I tried every single permutation
    > conceivable) I don't think much more is going to work on this device.


    The DIR-615 has numerous firmware versions up to E. I looked at the
    manual for E and it seems to imply that you can schedule the wireless
    enabled/disabled.

    The revision B C D E can be seen on the bottom of the device.

    > I don't think I can get onto those machines but if I could they would be
    > Vista, 7, XP. 3 machines 3 OSs. Likely more later.


    It seems that you are saying the 'school age' users, which ages could be
    from 5 to 18 have secured their machines from your access.

    What are the ages of these users?

    > There was a neat little utility I used on the babysitter when they were
    > younger (put on my machine) that not only provided keystroke capture but
    > screen capture. But again, I'd like to trust them when I can, but limit
    > my exposure where I can.


    What do you think about the concept of 'trust but verify' - in which the
    rules for the user are mutually agreed upon by user/child/teen and
    parent - and/but the user is informed that the parent will be monitoring
    the activity and that breaking the rules has significant consequences -
    which you must be able to enforce.

    .... as opposed to your being a supervisor/ security expert/ who has to
    control everything yourself. That is, it seems to me that it would be
    better to control nothing while maintaining the ability to monitor and
    to discipline/sanction for rule-breaking which rules are configured with
    the concordance of the governed.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 22, 2010
    #8
  9. ng_reader

    John Holmes Guest

    ng_reader "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:

    >
    >>>
    >>> mr curious

    >>
    >> I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't
    >> obey me I break their fucking fingers.
    >>
    >> Works great. No routers with parental control needed.
    >>

    >
    > Tactically good idea. But what do do when you run out of fingers?
    >


    Once I broke my oldest son's middle finger, he never argued with me
    again. So he still has 9 fingers left to break, but now there's no need
    to break them anymore.

    ;-)

    --
    <snip>
     
    John Holmes, Sep 22, 2010
    #9
  10. ng_reader

    ng_reader Guest


    > What do you think about the concept of 'trust but verify' - in which the
    > rules for the user are mutually agreed upon by user/child/teen and
    > parent - and/but the user is informed that the parent will be monitoring
    > the activity and that breaking the rules has significant consequences -
    > which you must be able to enforce.
    >
    > ... as opposed to your being a supervisor/ security expert/ who has to
    > control everything yourself. That is, it seems to me that it would be
    > better to control nothing while maintaining the ability to monitor and
    > to discipline/sanction for rule-breaking which rules are configured with
    > the concordance of the governed.
    >
    >


    In theory good in practice, err, not so good.

    Social networking is not a new phenomenon, just the concept of doing so
    while staring at a computer screen is.

    And, as all those users who have facebook accounts or similar, are
    finding that certain rules are de rigueur. So while my limiting sally on
    my end, sally's frend Bo, or in more particular --- Bo's parents --- are
    of a different mindset. Working out particulars for me and my kin don't
    necessarily work to well for Bo, or Bo's kin, or anyone else like Bo.

    I find it a little disturbing you are so interested in their ages, btw.
    But maybe that's just my problem.
     
    ng_reader, Sep 22, 2010
    #10
  11. ng_reader

    Mike Easter Guest

    ng_reader wrote:

    > I find it a little disturbing you are so interested in their ages, btw.
    > But maybe that's just my problem.


    I think about the differences in how I was supervised and not supervised
    as a 6 8 10 12 14 16 and 18 year old - also how I as an adult or mentor
    or teacher or counselor would interact with those individuals at the
    various age levels.

    I find it quaint that you find it a little disturbing and that also
    quaint/curious that it is /still/ concealed.

    Those age groups should not be lumped into one 'concept' by parent or
    non-parent.


    --
    Mike Easter
     
    Mike Easter, Sep 22, 2010
    #11
  12. ng_reader

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 19:24:27 +0200, John Holmes wrote:

    > ng_reader "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >
    >> Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >>
    >> Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >>
    >> I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    >> would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >>
    >> I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought the
    >> equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it, and
    >> start over again.
    >>
    >> But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    >> someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    >> btw) I am still left pondering.
    >>
    >> There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    >> called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    >> Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>
    >>
    >> I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.

    > Newegg
    >> suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >>
    >> Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    >> Asus
    >> Trendnet
    >> TP-Link (never heard of them)
    >> Belkin
    >> Buffalo Technology
    >> Encore (them neither)
    >> SMC
    >> Zonet
    >> Zoom
    >> ZyXel
    >>
    >> So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    >> company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    >> really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> mr curious

    >
    > I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't obey
    > me I break their fucking fingers.
    >
    > Works great. No routers with parental control needed.


    I told mine I would shoot him in the head. Never a problem here.



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 22, 2010
    #12
  13. ng_reader

    NotMe Guest

    "ng_reader" <> wrote in message
    news:i7dg5n$1rc$-september.org...
    >
    >> What do you think about the concept of 'trust but verify' - in which the
    >> rules for the user are mutually agreed upon by user/child/teen and
    >> parent - and/but the user is informed that the parent will be monitoring
    >> the activity and that breaking the rules has significant consequences -
    >> which you must be able to enforce.
    >>
    >> ... as opposed to your being a supervisor/ security expert/ who has to
    >> control everything yourself. That is, it seems to me that it would be
    >> better to control nothing while maintaining the ability to monitor and
    >> to discipline/sanction for rule-breaking which rules are configured with
    >> the concordance of the governed.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > In theory good in practice, err, not so good.
    >
    > Social networking is not a new phenomenon, just the concept of doing so
    > while staring at a computer screen is.
    >
    > And, as all those users who have facebook accounts or similar, are finding
    > that certain rules are de rigueur. So while my limiting sally on my end,
    > sally's frend Bo, or in more particular --- Bo's parents --- are of a
    > different mindset. Working out particulars for me and my kin don't
    > necessarily work to well for Bo, or Bo's kin, or anyone else like Bo.
    >
    > I find it a little disturbing you are so interested in their ages, btw.
    > But maybe that's just my problem.


    Age is an approximate factor in the skill set of the individual in
    circumventing parental controls. We work with foster families and the kids
    are good at ferreting out and defeating parental controls. Hint: the
    quickest work around is a friend's computer.

    Run of the mill we've had average good luck with www.opendns.com which has
    instruction for configuring various routers.

    Real world it's importatnt that the computers and visual access to the
    displays are in the common areas with parents being present and active in
    the mentoring. When testing content comes up (as it will) it's best to make
    the incident a teaching moment than a quick "shut that off".

    That's with the qualification that some incidents are best cut off at the
    get go. BTDT
     
    NotMe, Sep 22, 2010
    #13
  14. ng_reader

    NotMe Guest

    "John Holmes" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > ng_reader "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >
    >> Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >>
    >> Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >>
    >> I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    >> would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >>
    >> I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought the
    >> equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it, and
    >> start over again.
    >>
    >> But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    >> someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    >> btw) I am still left pondering.
    >>
    >> There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    >> called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    >> Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>
    >>
    >> I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.

    > Newegg
    >> suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >>
    >> Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    >> Asus
    >> Trendnet
    >> TP-Link (never heard of them)
    >> Belkin
    >> Buffalo Technology
    >> Encore (them neither)
    >> SMC
    >> Zonet
    >> Zoom
    >> ZyXel
    >>
    >> So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    >> company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    >> really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> mr curious

    >
    > I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't obey me
    > I break their fucking fingers.
    >
    > Works great. No routers with parental control needed.


    Always remember they get to pick the nursing home ... pay back is hell.
     
    NotMe, Sep 22, 2010
    #14
  15. ng_reader

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 15:35:26 -0600, §nühw¤£f wrote:

    > In message <>, Meat
    > Plow pondered the following:
    >> On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 19:24:27 +0200, John Holmes wrote:
    >>
    >> > ng_reader "contributed" in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >> >
    >> >> Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >> >>
    >> >> Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >> >>
    >> >> I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    >> >> would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >> >>
    >> >> I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought
    >> >> the equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it,
    >> >> and start over again.
    >> >>
    >> >> But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell
    >> >> from someone whose first language is other than English (mine is
    >> >> American btw) I am still left pondering.
    >> >>
    >> >> There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered
    >> >> router called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in
    >> >> that. Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>
    >> >>
    >> >> I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.
    >> > Newegg
    >> >> suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >> >>
    >> >> Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    >> >> Asus
    >> >> Trendnet
    >> >> TP-Link (never heard of them)
    >> >> Belkin
    >> >> Buffalo Technology
    >> >> Encore (them neither)
    >> >> SMC
    >> >> Zonet
    >> >> Zoom
    >> >> ZyXel
    >> >>
    >> >> So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good,
    >> >> a company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you
    >> >> are really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >> >>
    >> >> TIA
    >> >>
    >> >> mr curious
    >> >
    >> > I tell my kids what they are or not allowed to, and if they don't
    >> > obey me I break their fucking fingers.
    >> >
    >> > Works great. No routers with parental control needed.

    >>
    >> I told mine I would shoot him in the head. Never a problem here.
    >>

    > Pft! No wonder you're so fucked up. I suspected you were a victim of
    > child abuse.
    > Thanks for confirming.
    >
    > ^_^


    WoW you're on quite the roll there aren't you...heh. You were no doubt
    plotting out your revenge every second mommy was using her laptop.

    Maybe one day when you grow up and get a job you can buy your own
    computer and won't have to wait on mommy...heh



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 22, 2010
    #15
  16. ng_reader

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 05:02:08 +0000, §ñühw€£f wrote:

    >>WoW you're on quite the roll there aren't you...heh. You were no doubt
    >>plotting out your revenge every second mommy was using her laptop.
    >>
    >>Maybe one day when you grow up and get a job you can buy your own
    >>computer and won't have to wait on mommy...heh
    >>

    > Your diversionary tactic has failed. Now, how about telling us how often
    > daddy beat you?


    What part of grow up and get a job and buy your own computer /didn't/ you
    understand, junior?



    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 23, 2010
    #16
  17. Meat Plow wrote:
    > On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 05:02:08 +0000, §ñühw€£f wrote:
    >
    >>> WoW you're on quite the roll there aren't you...heh. You were no doubt
    >>> plotting out your revenge every second mommy was using her laptop.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe one day when you grow up and get a job you can buy your own
    >>> computer and won't have to wait on mommy...heh
    >>>

    >> Your diversionary tactic has failed. Now, how about telling us how often
    >> daddy beat you?

    >
    > What part of grow up and get a job and buy your own computer /didn't/ you
    > understand, junior?
    >

    So what you're sayin is that yer dad threw you out of the house at a
    young age. Hmmmmm....was he an alkie as well as being abusive?


    --
    www.skepticalscience.com|www.youtube.com/officialpeta
    cageprisoners.com|www.snuhwolf.9f.com|www.eyeonpalin.org
    _____ ____ ____ __ /\_/\ __ _ ______ _____
    / __/ |/ / / / / // // . . \\ \ |\ | / __ \ \ \ __\
    _\ \/ / /_/ / _ / \ / \ \| \| \ \_\ \ \__\ _\
    /___/_/|_/\____/_//_/ \_@_/ \__|\__|\____/\____\_\
     
    §ñühw¤£f, Sep 23, 2010
    #17
  18. ng_reader

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 08:28:19 -0600, §ñühw¤£f wrote:

    > Meat Plow wrote:
    >> On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 05:02:08 +0000, §ñühw€£f wrote:
    >>
    >>>> WoW you're on quite the roll there aren't you...heh. You were no
    >>>> doubt plotting out your revenge every second mommy was using her
    >>>> laptop.
    >>>>
    >>>> Maybe one day when you grow up and get a job you can buy your own
    >>>> computer and won't have to wait on mommy...heh
    >>>>
    >>> Your diversionary tactic has failed. Now, how about telling us how
    >>> often daddy beat you?

    >>
    >> What part of grow up and get a job and buy your own computer /didn't/
    >> you understand, junior?
    >>

    > So


    So you didn't understand it, ok. Guess I can't expect to educate the
    world. Hook back up with me when you grow up, junior.




    --
    Live Fast, Die Young and Leave a Pretty Corpse
     
    Meat Plow, Sep 23, 2010
    #18
  19. ng_reader

    chuckcar Guest

    ng_reader <> wrote in
    news:i7d71p$1f0$-september.org:

    > Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >
    > Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >
    > I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    > would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >
    > I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought
    > the equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it,
    > and start over again.
    >
    > But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    > someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    > btw) I am still left pondering.
    >
    > There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    > called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    > Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist. <g>
    >
    > I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.
    > Newegg suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >
    > Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    > Asus
    > Trendnet
    > TP-Link (never heard of them)
    > Belkin
    > Buffalo Technology
    > Encore (them neither)
    > SMC
    > Zonet
    > Zoom
    > ZyXel
    >
    > So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    > company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    > really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >
    > TIA
    >

    You apparently that routers can fix *any* internet related problem. They
    can't. They're merely devices to allow more than one computer to hook
    into another group. For anything else, you need to find out what that's
    called. In your case, it's called the power switch - either on your the
    computer in you sons's room or the circuit breaker *for* that room.

    If you wish to limit the amount of downloads in a given time period
    otherwise (for keeping to a very load ISP quota for example), You first
    need a method of keeping track of how much *is* downloading at any given
    time. That can be done with a firewall *program* (and yes you *do* need
    one on the internet), however, then you run into the problem of getting
    those numbers and using them. Unless you happen to have a firewall which
    allows you to dump its output into a normal text file (most don't for
    some inexplicable reason) you're then out of luck.

    Perhaps if you told us more about what computer hardware you *have*
    aside from your router(s) along with what internet software you use,
    there might very well be a solution you don't know of.

    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Sep 25, 2010
    #19
  20. ng_reader

    n0i Guest

    On 9/24/2010 9:19 PM, chuckcar wrote:
    > ng_reader<> wrote in
    > news:i7d71p$1f0$-september.org:
    >
    >> Like, only allowing access to certain websites after certain hours
    >>
    >> Or, blocking something like facebook or AIM chat?
    >>
    >> I have a D-Link today and while the feature set is impressive, what
    >> would be more impressive is if it actually worked.
    >>
    >> I know that a device costing under $100 means that I've just bought
    >> the equivalent of a "microwave oven". If it doesn't work, chuck it,
    >> and start over again.
    >>
    >> But after calling Linksys/Cisco/Valet and getting the *hard* sell from
    >> someone whose first language is other than English (mine is American
    >> btw) I am still left pondering.
    >>
    >> There is a neat little utility that I can flash onto a covered router
    >> called dd-wrt. And ideally I'd like to become proficient in that.
    >> Unfortunately, however, I have never been an idealist.<g>
    >>
    >> I guess the only work I've done is that I won't buy D-Link again.
    >> Newegg suggests these other fine manufacturers:
    >>
    >> Netgear (had one once, liked it because it e-mailed me router logs)
    >> Asus
    >> Trendnet
    >> TP-Link (never heard of them)
    >> Belkin
    >> Buffalo Technology
    >> Encore (them neither)
    >> SMC
    >> Zonet
    >> Zoom
    >> ZyXel
    >>
    >> So, when I was tasked with first understanding why CSCO was so good, a
    >> company shill calmly explained that when you buy their router, you are
    >> really buying their software. But, shhhh, don't tell Microsoft.
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>

    <Snipped chucar since I missed the OP's message>

    http://reviews.cnet.com/routers/?filter=500563_5514163_

    n0i
     
    n0i, Sep 25, 2010
    #20
    1. Advertising

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