wireless network security

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by rabbit, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. rabbit

    rabbit Guest

    If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there is no
    one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up my wifi
    broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or software that
    would allow them to pick up my signal?

    My signal is WPA encrypted, but there was a period of a few weeks when it
    was unintentionally left open due to some difficulties with my Linksys
    router.

    Any general suggestions to improve wireless security?
     
    rabbit, Dec 18, 2005
    #1
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  2. rabbit

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "rabbit" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns97307C9A8E88FMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131...
    > If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    > Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there is no
    > one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up my wifi
    > broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or software that
    > would allow them to pick up my signal?


    You ever hear of War Driving? You can look it up using Google.

    >
    > My signal is WPA encrypted, but there was a period of a few weeks when it
    > was unintentionally left open due to some difficulties with my Linksys
    > router.
    >
    > Any general suggestions to improve wireless security?


    Some other basics

    http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/wireless/a/aa112203_2.htm

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Dec 18, 2005
    #2
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  3. rabbit

    rabbit Guest

    "Duane Arnold" <> wrote in
    news:Q_gpf.5998$:

    >
    > "rabbit" <> wrote in message
    > news:Xns97307C9A8E88FMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131...
    >> If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    >> Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there
    >> is no one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up
    >> my wifi broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or
    >> software that would allow them to pick up my signal?

    >
    > You ever hear of War Driving? You can look it up using Google.


    Duane,

    I've read about it, but not so much as a security threat as a way to get
    free connectivity. If they're surfing on someone else's dime, does that
    mean these "wardrivers" can connect to the host's hard drive, provided the
    host does not have file and printer sharing enabled?

    Thanks.









    > Some other basics
    >
    > http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/wireless/a/aa112203_2.htm
    >
    > Duane :)
     
    rabbit, Dec 18, 2005
    #3
  4. rabbit

    Duane Arnold Guest

    "rabbit" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9730C10516ECCMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131...
    > "Duane Arnold" <> wrote in
    > news:Q_gpf.5998$:
    >
    >>
    >> "rabbit" <> wrote in message
    >> news:Xns97307C9A8E88FMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131...
    >>> If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    >>> Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there
    >>> is no one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up
    >>> my wifi broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or
    >>> software that would allow them to pick up my signal?

    >>
    >> You ever hear of War Driving? You can look it up using Google.

    >
    > Duane,
    >
    > I've read about it, but not so much as a security threat as a way to get
    > free connectivity. If they're surfing on someone else's dime, does that
    > mean these "wardrivers" can connect to the host's hard drive, provided the
    > host does not have file and printer sharing enabled?
    >


    You don't have F & P sharing active on the machine, then they cannot access
    it that I know about.

    But just having someone access your wireless setup such as a gateway router
    is a secuirty risk in the fact that they can use your setup as a jumping off
    point to attack other machines and networks on the Internet leaving you
    holding the bag as it's tracked back to you.

    Duane :)
     
    Duane Arnold, Dec 19, 2005
    #4
  5. rabbit

    Billh Guest

    rabbit wrote:
    > "Duane Arnold" <> wrote in
    > news:Q_gpf.5998$:
    >
    >
    >>"rabbit" <> wrote in message
    >>news:Xns97307C9A8E88FMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131...
    >>
    >>>If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    >>>Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there
    >>>is no one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up
    >>>my wifi broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or
    >>>software that would allow them to pick up my signal?

    >>
    >>You ever hear of War Driving? You can look it up using Google.

    >
    >
    > Duane,
    >
    > I've read about it, but not so much as a security threat as a way to get
    > free connectivity. If they're surfing on someone else's dime, does that
    > mean these "wardrivers" can connect to the host's hard drive, provided the
    > host does not have file and printer sharing enabled?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>Some other basics
    >>
    >>http://netsecurity.about.com/cs/wireless/a/aa112203_2.htm
    >>
    >>Duane :)


    As far as getting in to your hard drive with out sharing turned on it
    would stop most people but if a good hacker is inside your network via
    open wifi he would have a good shot at it.

    As to your OP even if you can not see another network does not mean it
    is not there if all you are using is Windows built in finder. If they
    have just turned off broadcasting SSID that would fool windows. You can
    get better apps check for other wifi.

    http://www.grc.com/securitynow.htm Here is link to a podcast that can
    tell you a lot about security some of the back issues are all about wifi.
     
    Billh, Dec 19, 2005
    #5
  6. rabbit

    Mitch Guest

    In article <Xns97307C9A8E88FMyemailaddressnet@66.150.105.131>, rabbit
    <> wrote:

    > If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    > Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there is no
    > one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up my wifi
    > broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or software that
    > would allow them to pick up my signal?


    They could boost the signal, sure -- but I don't see any reason you'd
    see their machine listed just because they can see your signal. They
    can receive, and boost, and report your location to other users.
    The list of networks available does not mean that there aren't many
    machines connecting and using it. It doesn't even mean there are no
    other networks.

    I, too, don't know how much they'd have to go through to access your
    machine. but you are at least using security now.
     
    Mitch, Dec 19, 2005
    #6
  7. rabbit

    Keme Guest

    rabbit wrote:
    > If I can't see any others' than my own under "Available Networks" in
    > Wireless Network Connections, does this necessarily mean that there is no
    > one in my physical neighborhood who is within range to pick up my wifi
    > broadcast? If not, how is there more powerful equipment or software that
    > would allow them to pick up my signal?
    >
    > My signal is WPA encrypted, but there was a period of a few weeks when it
    > was unintentionally left open due to some difficulties with my Linksys
    > router.
    >
    > Any general suggestions to improve wireless security?


    "Available networks" says next to nothing about how many computers are
    within range of your network. It just shows how many networks with SSID
    broadcast you are within range of.

    Wireless clients (common PC workstations) do not proclaim their
    existence unless they're set up with wireless p2p networking (also known
    as ad-hoc WLANs), so you won't see them.

    Wireless base stations (=access points) can be set up to not broadcast
    the SSID (=network name) too, in which case you'd have to know the SSID
    in order to connect.

    WPA encrypts the network traffic, making it difficult for unauthorized
    clients both to connect and to eavesdrop. (WEP does the same, but is not
    as hard to crack. Use only if you have equipment without WPA support.)

    MAC address filtering makes unauthorized connections even harder.

    These protection schemes rely on static data, shared between access
    point and client computer. This is easily manageable in most home
    networks, but in a larger environment (>10-15 clients and 3 access
    points) some centrally managed password protection scheme is better
    (most access points have RADIUS support). While more work is required to
    set it up, day to day management is much easier.

    Additionally, disable SSID broadcast on the base station, if possible.
     
    Keme, Dec 22, 2005
    #7
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