Wireless network legality

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by bassetrox@moose-mail.com, Apr 14, 2006.

  1. Guest

    If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.

    thank you
    , Apr 14, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. FedUp Guest

    On 14 Apr 2006 13:51:23 -0700, wrote:

    > If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    > what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.
    >
    > thank you


    I'm not sure if UK citizens can be held legally responsible for stupidity
    for not securing their wireless network. Maybe you should consult a
    barrister.
    FedUp, Apr 14, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Don't know about the UK, but in Florida the St. Pete Police think it's a 3rd
    degree felony:

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=915076

    Doug Sherman
    MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    > what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.
    >
    > thank you
    >
    Doug Sherman [MVP], Apr 14, 2006
    #3
  4. James Gockel Guest

    That is so stupid. If you don't secure your network your asking for it. And
    with just having your laptop on and driving down the street you can
    accidentally connect to a network, because of Windows Zero Config, or even
    other wireless utilities. Or even a palm pilot or other pda with wifi
    capability.
    From what I know, the actual point of where it becomes illegal, is the
    actual use of the router's processing power. So actually if you can sniff
    the air without connecting to the router, it's not illegal.
    Now, I have to mention, I'm not a lawyer, this is all only what i've heard.
    If you get caught sniffing and in your state it's illegal, that's your own
    fault. I think these laws should be changed, to what the specifics of what
    is illegal, but I am only one man.
    If you have any questions about legality of wireless networks and sniffing
    you should go to your city center and ask for some legal council. They can
    direct you from there.
    -James G.



    "Doug Sherman [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Don't know about the UK, but in Florida the St. Pete Police think it's a
    > 3rd
    > degree felony:
    >
    > http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=915076
    >
    > Doug Sherman
    > MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    >> what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.
    >>
    >> thank you
    >>

    >
    >
    James Gockel, Apr 15, 2006
    #4
  5. Oops - looks like Gregory Straszkiewicz in Isleworth, U.K. was convicted for
    unauthorized use of unprotected residential wireless LANs in July of 2005.
    He was fined $874 and got a 12-month conditional discharge:

    http://www.computerworld.com/mobiletopics/mobile/story/0,10801,103774,00.htm
    l

    Oddly - I am unable to discover the disposition of the Florida - maybe there
    hasn't been one yet.

    Obviously, many people feel that an unprotected wireless access point = an
    implicit invitation to connect. Presumably, prosecutions are being pusued
    based upon new state or national laws rather than ancient larceny statutes.
    Also presumably, these new statutes vary considerably and it will be
    interesting to see how different courts interpret them under different fact
    situations. In the mean time - yes, be sure you know and at least think you
    understand your local laws. It is probably worth noting that almost all
    criminal offenses require some kind of criminal intent - a truly accidental
    connection cannot be a crime.

    Doug Sherman
    MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP


    "James Gockel" <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote in message
    news:...
    > That is so stupid. If you don't secure your network your asking for it.

    And
    > with just having your laptop on and driving down the street you can
    > accidentally connect to a network, because of Windows Zero Config, or even
    > other wireless utilities. Or even a palm pilot or other pda with wifi
    > capability.
    > From what I know, the actual point of where it becomes illegal, is th
    > actual use of the router's processing power. So actually if you can sniff
    > the air without connecting to the router, it's not illegal.
    > Now, I have to mention, I'm not a lawyer, this is all only what i've

    heard.
    > If you get caught sniffing and in your state it's illegal, that's your own
    > fault. I think these laws should be changed, to what the specifics of what
    > is illegal, but I am only one man.
    > If you have any questions about legality of wireless networks and sniffing
    > you should go to your city center and ask for some legal council. They can
    > direct you from there.
    > -James G.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Doug Sherman [MVP]" <> wrote in

    message
    > news:...
    > > Don't know about the UK, but in Florida the St. Pete Police think it's a
    > > 3rd
    > > degree felony:
    > >
    > > http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=915076
    > >
    > > Doug Sherman
    > > MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
    > >
    > > <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    > >> what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.
    > >>
    > >> thank you
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    Doug Sherman [MVP], Apr 15, 2006
    #5
  6. Jack Guest

    Hi
    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20050707-5068.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Doug Sherman [MVP]" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Oops - looks like Gregory Straszkiewicz in Isleworth, U.K. was convicted
    > for
    > unauthorized use of unprotected residential wireless LANs in July of 2005.
    > He was fined $874 and got a 12-month conditional discharge:
    >
    > http://www.computerworld.com/mobiletopics/mobile/story/0,10801,103774,00.htm
    > l
    >
    > Oddly - I am unable to discover the disposition of the Florida - maybe
    > there
    > hasn't been one yet.
    >
    > Obviously, many people feel that an unprotected wireless access point = an
    > implicit invitation to connect. Presumably, prosecutions are being pusued
    > based upon new state or national laws rather than ancient larceny
    > statutes.
    > Also presumably, these new statutes vary considerably and it will be
    > interesting to see how different courts interpret them under different
    > fact
    > situations. In the mean time - yes, be sure you know and at least think
    > you
    > understand your local laws. It is probably worth noting that almost all
    > criminal offenses require some kind of criminal intent - a truly
    > accidental
    > connection cannot be a crime.
    >
    > Doug Sherman
    > MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
    >
    >
    > "James Gockel" <flibbertigibbet007_at_hotmail_dot_com> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> That is so stupid. If you don't secure your network your asking for it.

    > And
    >> with just having your laptop on and driving down the street you can
    >> accidentally connect to a network, because of Windows Zero Config, or
    >> even
    >> other wireless utilities. Or even a palm pilot or other pda with wifi
    >> capability.
    >> From what I know, the actual point of where it becomes illegal, is th
    >> actual use of the router's processing power. So actually if you can sniff
    >> the air without connecting to the router, it's not illegal.
    >> Now, I have to mention, I'm not a lawyer, this is all only what i've

    > heard.
    >> If you get caught sniffing and in your state it's illegal, that's your
    >> own
    >> fault. I think these laws should be changed, to what the specifics of
    >> what
    >> is illegal, but I am only one man.
    >> If you have any questions about legality of wireless networks and
    >> sniffing
    >> you should go to your city center and ask for some legal council. They
    >> can
    >> direct you from there.
    >> -James G.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> "Doug Sherman [MVP]" <> wrote in

    > message
    >> news:...
    >> > Don't know about the UK, but in Florida the St. Pete Police think it's
    >> > a
    >> > 3rd
    >> > degree felony:
    >> >
    >> > http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=915076
    >> >
    >> > Doug Sherman
    >> > MCSE, MCSA, MCP+I, MVP
    >> >
    >> > <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> >> If another computer user connects to my unsecured wireless network,
    >> >> what is the legality of the situation? I am a UK citizen.
    >> >>
    >> >> thank you
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    Jack, Apr 16, 2006
    #6
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. BWGames

    Action Pack - legality?

    BWGames, Nov 19, 2004, in forum: Microsoft Certification
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    3,531
    T-Bone
    Dec 2, 2004
  2. Raj Singh
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    504
  3. vbMark

    Complicated music downloading legality question

    vbMark, Nov 1, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    937
    Millimeter
    Nov 12, 2004
  4. RichA

    DVD backup legality

    RichA, Feb 12, 2005, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    49
    Views:
    2,399
    Richard C.
    Feb 17, 2005
  5. LesV

    RE: DVD backup legality question

    LesV, Mar 3, 2005, in forum: DVD Video
    Replies:
    29
    Views:
    1,902
    Justin
    Mar 6, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page