Wireless "N"?

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Pegleg, Sep 27, 2007.

  1. Pegleg

    Pegleg Guest

    Is it worth going to the "N" protocol? Realize that I would have to
    get a "N" adaptor for my laptop.

    Is the range and speed that much better? Any negative effects with
    other equipment running "B" or "G"?

    TIA
     
    Pegleg, Sep 27, 2007
    #1
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  2. Pegleg

    Barb Bowman Guest

    no one is making any real guarantees that the Draft N hardware
    available today will be able to be updated to run the final approved
    standard. B will slow down even a G network because G/N must stop
    and wait for B traffic. So if you have no B, it is best to run in
    G/N or G mode only, if available on your router.

    On Wed, 26 Sep 2007 18:59:18 -0700, Pegleg <>
    wrote:

    >Is it worth going to the "N" protocol? Realize that I would have to
    >get a "N" adaptor for my laptop.
    >
    >Is the range and speed that much better? Any negative effects with
    >other equipment running "B" or "G"?
    >
    >TIA

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman, Sep 27, 2007
    #2
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  3. Pegleg

    Pegleg Guest

    Thanks for your post...

    I understand the "no guarantees" part...what I want to know is:

    If I install a "N" router and use a "N" adaptor in my laptop will it be
    faster and have better range.? Why would I run in "G" mode if I have a
    "N" router and "N" adaptor card?


    On Thu, 27 Sep 2007 05:18:28 -0400, Barb Bowman <> wrote:

    >no one is making any real guarantees that the Draft N hardware
    >available today will be able to be updated to run the final approved
    >standard. B will slow down even a G network because G/N must stop
    >and wait for B traffic. So if you have no B, it is best to run in
    >G/N or G mode only, if available on your router.
    >
    >On Wed, 26 Sep 2007 18:59:18 -0700, Pegleg <>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>Is it worth going to the "N" protocol? Realize that I would have to
    >>get a "N" adaptor for my laptop.
    >>
    >>Is the range and speed that much better? Any negative effects with
    >>other equipment running "B" or "G"?
    >>
    >>TIA
     
    Pegleg, Sep 27, 2007
    #3
  4. Pegleg

    Barb Bowman Guest

    yes, it will have better range (or should). faster to transfer files
    to a wired desktop or another N enabled computer, but the speed of
    transfers from the Internet also depend on other factors.

    G/N only seems to be offered on many of the new draft 2.0 N routers.
    If you have a setting on the one you purchase for N only, you can
    certainly use it. You asked about negative effects with equipment
    running G or B which suggested you might already have a wireless b/g
    network with wireless computers/devices.

    On Thu, 27 Sep 2007 06:02:53 -0700, Pegleg <>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for your post...
    >
    >I understand the "no guarantees" part...what I want to know is:
    >
    >If I install a "N" router and use a "N" adaptor in my laptop will it be
    >faster and have better range.? Why would I run in "G" mode if I have a
    >"N" router and "N" adaptor card?
    >
    >
    >On Thu, 27 Sep 2007 05:18:28 -0400, Barb Bowman <> wrote:
    >
    >>no one is making any real guarantees that the Draft N hardware
    >>available today will be able to be updated to run the final approved
    >>standard. B will slow down even a G network because G/N must stop
    >>and wait for B traffic. So if you have no B, it is best to run in
    >>G/N or G mode only, if available on your router.
    >>
    >>On Wed, 26 Sep 2007 18:59:18 -0700, Pegleg <>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>Is it worth going to the "N" protocol? Realize that I would have to
    >>>get a "N" adaptor for my laptop.
    >>>
    >>>Is the range and speed that much better? Any negative effects with
    >>>other equipment running "B" or "G"?
    >>>
    >>>TIA

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman, Sep 27, 2007
    #4
  5. Pegleg

    Hertz_Donut Guest

    "Barb Bowman" <> wrote in message
    news:eek:...
    > no one is making any real guarantees that the Draft N hardware
    > available today will be able to be updated to run the final approved
    > standard. B will slow down even a G network because G/N must stop
    > and wait for B traffic. So if you have no B, it is best to run in
    > G/N or G mode only, if available on your router.


    Draft 2.0 has been certified by the WI-Fi Alliance. The IEEE has closed
    suggestions on the final ratification of 802.11n. That means that it is
    very unlikely that there will be any harware changes between what is on the
    shelf today that supports Draft 2.0 and the final ratified 802.11n protocol.
    It is a safe bet buying any fof the brands now shipping ver. 2.0 equipment
    (Netgear, Linksys, Buffalo). Stay away from anthing Belkin makes. Their
    "N1" technology is not chip-level compatible with the certified 802.11n
    protocol, and will not be uspgradable to the final version when it is
    ratified.
    >


    There is significant performance inprovement in both range and throughput
    when switching to N over G.
    It is well worth the inverstment.

    Honu
     
    Hertz_Donut, Sep 29, 2007
    #5
  6. Pegleg

    Barb Bowman Guest

    while I agree it is unlikely that there will be hardware changes,
    the vendors are still not making guarantees of compatibility. as
    long as the end user understands that (which could mean that the
    vendor won't make upgrades available because they are concentrating
    on new hardware releases)..



    On Fri, 28 Sep 2007 15:12:09 -1000, "Hertz_Donut"
    <> wrote:

    >Draft 2.0 has been certified by the WI-Fi Alliance. The IEEE has closed
    >suggestions on the final ratification of 802.11n. That means that it is
    >very unlikely that there will be any harware changes between what is on the
    >shelf today that supports Draft 2.0 and the final ratified 802.11n protocol.
    >It is a safe bet buying any fof the brands now shipping ver. 2.0 equipment
    >(Netgear, Linksys, Buffalo). Stay away from anthing Belkin makes. Their
    >"N1" technology is not chip-level compatible with the certified 802.11n
    >protocol, and will not be uspgradable to the final version when it is
    >ratified.
    >>

    >
    >There is significant performance inprovement in both range and throughput
    >when switching to N over G.
    >It is well worth the inverstment.

    --

    Barb Bowman
    MS Windows-MVP
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/expertzone/meetexperts/bowman.mspx
    http://blogs.digitalmediaphile.com/barb/
     
    Barb Bowman, Sep 29, 2007
    #6
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