Wireless N Routers: Some Advice Please

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by David C, Oct 7, 2007.

  1. David C

    David C Guest

    I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully developed
    yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?

    Thanks for your advice.

    David C
     
    David C, Oct 7, 2007
    #1
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  2. David C

    Dave Taylor Guest

    "David C" <> wrote in news:47081a95$:

    > I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    > developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would
    > recommend?
    >
    > Thanks for your advice.
    >
    > David C
    >
    >


    I would only pay the money for N if you need the speed it brings to the
    table. I have .b and it is faster than my internet connection, so I am not
    that concerned about upgrading. Security is another consideration.
    If you are planning on streaming some video through the wireless
    connection, then you need the speed to get excellent quality full screen
    playback. ( So I have heard)


    --
    Ciao, Dave
     
    Dave Taylor, Oct 7, 2007
    #2
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  3. David C

    whoisthis Guest

    In article <47081a95$>, "David C" <>
    wrote:

    > I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully developed
    > yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?
    >
    > Thanks for your advice.
    >
    > David C


    I have an Apple one which has worked flawlessly for me for the last 8
    months or so. I have had far better experiences with Apple wireless than
    I have with Belkin, Linksys or Dynalink and I would NEVER buy another
    ADSL modem with wireless built in as there is ALWAYS a compromise,
    either the wireless works well but the ADSL sucks or vice-versa.

    of course in all these situations YMMV.
     
    whoisthis, Oct 7, 2007
    #3
  4. David C

    XPD Guest

    "David C" <> wrote in message news:47081a95$...
    > I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    > developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?
    >
    > Thanks for your advice.
    >
    > David C


    Stick with a decent brand (3Com, Libnksys etc) and you should be right for
    when N is finally comfimed.
    Some other branded wifi units labelled as Pre-N, apparently dont guarantee
    you can upgrade to the final spec.
     
    XPD, Oct 7, 2007
    #4
  5. David C

    David C Guest

    "whoisthis" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <47081a95$>, "David C" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    >> router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    >> recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    >> developed
    >> yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?
    >>
    >> Thanks for your advice.
    >>
    >> David C

    >
    > I have an Apple one which has worked flawlessly for me for the last 8
    > months or so. I have had far better experiences with Apple wireless than
    > I have with Belkin, Linksys or Dynalink and I would NEVER buy another
    > ADSL modem with wireless built in as there is ALWAYS a compromise,
    > either the wireless works well but the ADSL sucks or vice-versa.
    >
    > of course in all these situations YMMV.


    Thanks for this advice. I am using Telstra cable broadband, so does this
    influence the choice at all?
     
    David C, Oct 7, 2007
    #5
  6. David C

    whoisthis Guest

    In article <47084f92$>, "David C" <>
    wrote:

    > "whoisthis" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > In article <47081a95$>, "David C" <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > >> router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > >> recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    > >> developed
    > >> yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?
    > >>
    > >> Thanks for your advice.
    > >>
    > >> David C

    > >
    > > I have an Apple one which has worked flawlessly for me for the last 8
    > > months or so. I have had far better experiences with Apple wireless than
    > > I have with Belkin, Linksys or Dynalink and I would NEVER buy another
    > > ADSL modem with wireless built in as there is ALWAYS a compromise,
    > > either the wireless works well but the ADSL sucks or vice-versa.
    > >
    > > of course in all these situations YMMV.

    >
    > Thanks for this advice. I am using Telstra cable broadband, so does this
    > influence the choice at all?


    Not so long as you have ethernet, again though YMMV
     
    whoisthis, Oct 7, 2007
    #6
  7. David C

    Gordon Guest

    On 2007-10-07, Dave Taylor <> wrote:
    >
    > I would only pay the money for N if you need the speed it brings to the
    > table. I have .b and it is faster than my internet connection, so I am not
    > that concerned about upgrading.


    Wireless speed needs to be stated with the conditions in which it is being
    used.

    A gigabyte ethernet connection will beat wireless any day for the amount of
    data transferred. So want to tranfer lots of big files now, wireless kind of
    is so dial up speed.

    So how fast do you require your wireless connection to be? ie what do you
    use it for. What is the point of have a sports car to drive between the
    traffic lights?

    > Security is another consideration.


    Nope has been since before homosapiens appeared on this planet.


    > If you are planning on streaming some video through the wireless
    > connection, then you need the speed to get excellent quality full screen
    > playback. ( So I have heard)


    Read video streaming requires some large(r) bandwidth.




    >
    >
     
    Gordon, Oct 7, 2007
    #7
  8. On a pleasant day while strolling in nz.comp, a person
    by the name of whoisthis exclaimed:
    > I would NEVER buy another
    > ADSL modem with wireless built in as there is ALWAYS a compromise,
    > either the wireless works well but the ADSL sucks or vice-versa.


    Agreed strongly with this. I have regretted several
    combined products.

    However, most people are too cheap to buy separate
    devices, and will just suffer through lowest common
    denominator devices. To the point that it is hard to
    find decent standalone products for home markets.

    --
    aaronl at consultant dot com
    For every expert, there is an equal and
    opposite expert. - Arthur C. Clarke
     
    Aaron Lawrence, Oct 7, 2007
    #8
  9. David C

    Fred Guest

    "Gordon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 2007-10-07, Dave Taylor <> wrote:
    >>
    >> I would only pay the money for N if you need the speed it brings to the
    >> table. I have .b and it is faster than my internet connection, so I am
    >> not
    >> that concerned about upgrading.

    >
    > Wireless speed needs to be stated with the conditions in which it is being
    > used.
    >
    > A gigabyte ethernet connection will beat wireless any day for the amount
    > of
    > data transferred. So want to tranfer lots of big files now, wireless kind
    > of
    > is so dial up speed.
    >
    > So how fast do you require your wireless connection to be? ie what do you
    > use it for.


    What is the point of have a sports car to drive between the
    > traffic lights?
    >


    Picking up crumpet.
     
    Fred, Oct 7, 2007
    #9
  10. David C

    Richard Guest

    David C wrote:
    > I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    > developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?


    Yes, N has less deadspots when you dont have line of sight to the
    accesspoint. We tried one at a mates place and the single accesspoint
    gave over 20Mb link speed and good thru put wherever in the house and
    all the way outside a good 40m from the house, G in the same location
    only worked on one floor well and somewhat at one end of upstairs. Its
    by no means a large house either, under 150m²
     
    Richard, Oct 7, 2007
    #10
  11. David C

    whoisthis Guest

    In article <>, Richard <>
    wrote:

    > David C wrote:
    > > I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    > > router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    > > recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    > > developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?

    >
    > Yes, N has less deadspots when you dont have line of sight to the
    > accesspoint. We tried one at a mates place and the single accesspoint
    > gave over 20Mb link speed and good thru put wherever in the house and
    > all the way outside a good 40m from the house, G in the same location
    > only worked on one floor well and somewhat at one end of upstairs. Its
    > by no means a large house either, under 150m²


    A GOOD B/G wireless hub would do better. My old apple B wireless hub had
    better than twice the distance of either my Linksys or Dynalink
    ADSL/Wireless routers.
     
    whoisthis, Oct 7, 2007
    #11
  12. David C

    David C Guest

    "Richard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > David C wrote:
    >> I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    >> router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    >> recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    >> developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would recommend?

    >
    > Yes, N has less deadspots when you dont have line of sight to the
    > accesspoint. We tried one at a mates place and the single accesspoint gave
    > over 20Mb link speed and good thru put wherever in the house and all the
    > way outside a good 40m from the house, G in the same location only worked
    > on one floor well and somewhat at one end of upstairs. Its by no means a
    > large house either, under 150m².


    Thanks, that's interesting. The blurb for one Wireless N router for sale
    says this:

    "It's a draft 802.11n compliant device that delivers real world performance
    of up to 650% faster than a 802.11g wireless connection and faster than
    100Mbps wired Ethernet. Connect the RangeBooster N 650 Router to a cable or
    DSL modem and share your high-speed internet access with everyone on the
    network. Powered by RangeBooster N 650 Technology this high performance
    router provides superior Whole Home Coverage while eliminating dead spots.
    All of the latest wirelss security features are supported including WPA and
    WEP, along with SPI and NAT dual firewall protection."

    My question is, can a router really boost the speed of your wired cable
    internet ethernet connection?
     
    David C, Oct 7, 2007
    #12
  13. David C

    sam Guest

    David C wrote:
    >
    > "Richard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> David C wrote:
    >>> I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    >>> router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    >>> recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    >>> developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would
    >>> recommend?

    >>
    >> Yes, N has less deadspots when you dont have line of sight to the
    >> accesspoint. We tried one at a mates place and the single accesspoint
    >> gave over 20Mb link speed and good thru put wherever in the house and
    >> all the way outside a good 40m from the house, G in the same location
    >> only worked on one floor well and somewhat at one end of upstairs. Its
    >> by no means a large house either, under 150m².

    >
    > Thanks, that's interesting. The blurb for one Wireless N router for sale
    > says this:
    >
    > "It's a draft 802.11n compliant device that delivers real world
    > performance of up to 650% faster than a 802.11g wireless connection and
    > faster than 100Mbps wired Ethernet. Connect the RangeBooster N 650
    > Router to a cable or DSL modem and share your high-speed internet access
    > with everyone on the network. Powered by RangeBooster N 650 Technology
    > this high performance router provides superior Whole Home Coverage while
    > eliminating dead spots. All of the latest wirelss security features are
    > supported including WPA and WEP, along with SPI and NAT dual firewall
    > protection."
    >
    > My question is, can a router really boost the speed of your wired cable
    > internet ethernet connection?
    >


    No
    But the computers on your network will be able to communicate faster
    with each other.
    Which can be quite significant if you use a`wired pc to download
    torrents and you want to transfer them to a wireless laptop.
    Or you want to play a divx file which is on another wifi client pc
     
    sam, Oct 7, 2007
    #13
  14. David C

    PeeCee Guest

    "David C" <> wrote in message news:47095544$...
    >
    > "Richard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> David C wrote:
    >>> I'm wondering whether anyone has had any experience with a Wireless-N
    >>> router? If you can afford the price of a Wireless N router, would you
    >>> recommend buying this even though the N standard hasn't been fully
    >>> developed yet? Is there any particular brand / model you would
    >>> recommend?

    >>
    >> Yes, N has less deadspots when you dont have line of sight to the
    >> accesspoint. We tried one at a mates place and the single accesspoint
    >> gave over 20Mb link speed and good thru put wherever in the house and all
    >> the way outside a good 40m from the house, G in the same location only
    >> worked on one floor well and somewhat at one end of upstairs. Its by no
    >> means a large house either, under 150m².

    >
    > Thanks, that's interesting. The blurb for one Wireless N router for sale
    > says this:
    >
    > "It's a draft 802.11n compliant device that delivers real world
    > performance of up to 650% faster than a 802.11g wireless connection and
    > faster than 100Mbps wired Ethernet. Connect the RangeBooster N 650 Router
    > to a cable or DSL modem and share your high-speed internet access with
    > everyone on the network. Powered by RangeBooster N 650 Technology this
    > high performance router provides superior Whole Home Coverage while
    > eliminating dead spots. All of the latest wirelss security features are
    > supported including WPA and WEP, along with SPI and NAT dual firewall
    > protection."
    >
    > My question is, can a router really boost the speed of your wired cable
    > internet ethernet connection?
    >



    David

    "No"

    The 'Boost' part of the Marketing Bulls..t above refers to the range or how
    far the wireless signal will travel before it drops out.
    i.e. the 'Wireless' reach.

    The simple fact of the matter is most broadband connections are limited in
    speed by the bandwidth of their Modem/ISP connections.
    Adding a Wireless 'n' router to your LAN will only affect file transfer
    speeds between devices on your internal LAN that are talking to the wireless
    connected devices.

    The realities of broadband are that you are unlikely to get much beyond half
    the claimed maximum speed.
    So if your Cable gives you (say) 12Mbit/sec then shuffling the data across
    your LAN at 100Mbits/sec won't make the data arrive any quicker.
    Even if you are lucky enough to live with 100Mbit/sec available at the
    door/cable box the realities are that websites themselves won't send data
    to you at anything like that speed.

    Best
    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Oct 8, 2007
    #14
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