Wireless connectivity: failed "renewing your IP address"

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by lenoir, Dec 18, 2007.

  1. lenoir

    lenoir Guest

    I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.

    I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    completed: Renewing your IP address".

    I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    g access point plugs into the modem.

    I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    wireless, so I know it works.

    Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    lenoir, Dec 18, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. lenoir

    Lem Guest

    lenoir wrote:
    > I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    > my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    > SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    > But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >
    > I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    > repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    > completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >
    > I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    > g access point plugs into the modem.
    >
    > I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    > wireless, so I know it works.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.


    Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    your wireless access point.

    It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    or a wireless router.

    That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).

    There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    See http://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Dec 19, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. lenoir

    lenoir Guest

    On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    > lenoir wrote:
    > > I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    > > my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    > > SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    > > But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.

    >
    > > I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    > > repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    > > completed: Renewing your IP address".

    >
    > > I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    > > g access point plugs into the modem.

    >
    > > I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    > > wireless, so I know it works.

    >
    > > Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.

    >
    > Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    > and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    > your wireless access point.
    >
    > It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    > router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    > question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    > or a wireless router.
    >
    > That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    > failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    > disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    > (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >
    > There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    > installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    > utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    > Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    scratch and redo?

    I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    today, so that should no longer be an issue.

    My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.

    The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    WAP 54G v.2.

    I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.

    Thank you!
    lenoir, Dec 19, 2007
    #3
  4. lenoir

    Lem Guest

    lenoir wrote:
    > On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >> lenoir wrote:
    >>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    >>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    >>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    >>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    >>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.

    >> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    >> your wireless access point.
    >>
    >> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    >> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    >> or a wireless router.
    >>
    >> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>
    >> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    >> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    > passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    > guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    > scratch and redo?
    >
    > I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    > today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >
    > My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    > properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    > be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >
    > The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    > WAP 54G v.2.
    >
    > I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >
    > Thank you!


    Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H
    is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second
    rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per
    second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that
    is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not
    your LAN connection).

    Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    router.

    Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable
    or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK
    when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to
    obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or
    has a static IP address of the correct form for your network.

    All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of
    your laptop's NIC is probably OK.

    To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is
    to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to
    take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through
    the access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually
    anything you want without worrying about messing things up as long as
    you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you really want to
    make a change.

    Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use
    your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.

    Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This
    is the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen.
    The default user name is admin and the default password is admin.

    If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different address
    or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the
    Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the
    Linksys Setup Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what
    IP address has been assigned to the access point.

    If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name
    and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its
    defaults and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.

    Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for
    security mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys
    devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you
    need to do is write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and
    also make a note of the security mode. It should be either
    WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice
    of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note that as well. You could now exit the
    router's configuration and use this info to set up your wireless laptop.

    If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set
    the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't
    forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.

    While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    were set up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect
    until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's
    list. I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's
    not much, if any, of a security addition.



    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Dec 19, 2007
    #4
  5. lenoir

    lenoir Guest

    On Dec 19, 1:28 am, Lem <> wrote:
    > lenoir wrote:
    > > On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    > >> lenoir wrote:
    > >>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    > >>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    > >>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    > >>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    > >>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    > >>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    > >>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    > >>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    > >>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    > >>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    > >>> wireless, so I know it works.
    > >>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    > >> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    > >> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    > >> your wireless access point.

    >
    > >> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    > >> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    > >> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    > >> or a wireless router.

    >
    > >> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    > >> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    > >> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    > >> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).

    >
    > >> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    > >> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    > >> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    > >> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.n...Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    > > passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    > > guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    > > scratch and redo?

    >
    > > I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    > > today, so that should no longer be an issue.

    >
    > > My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    > > properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    > > be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.

    >
    > > The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    > > WAP 54G v.2.

    >
    > > I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.

    >
    > > Thank you!

    >
    > Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H
    > is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    > fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second
    > rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per
    > second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that
    > is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not
    > your LAN connection).
    >
    > Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    > router.
    >
    > Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    > whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable
    > or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK
    > when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to
    > obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or
    > has a static IP address of the correct form for your network.
    >
    > All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of
    > your laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >
    > To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is
    > to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    > don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    > take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to
    > take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through
    > the access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually
    > anything you want without worrying about messing things up as long as
    > you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you really want to
    > make a change.
    >
    > Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    > Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use
    > your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.
    >
    > Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This
    > is the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen.
    > The default user name is admin and the default password is admin.
    >
    > If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    > whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different address
    > or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the
    > Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the
    > Linksys Setup Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what
    > IP address has been assigned to the access point.
    >
    > If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name
    > and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its
    > defaults and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >
    > Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    > successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    > See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for
    > security mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys
    > devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you
    > need to do is write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and
    > also make a note of the security mode. It should be either
    > WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice
    > of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note that as well. You could now exit the
    > router's configuration and use this info to set up your wireless laptop.
    >
    > If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set
    > the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't
    > forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >
    > While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    > check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    > were set up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect
    > until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's
    > list. I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's
    > not much, if any, of a security addition.
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    GREAT information and instructions--thanks so much for all your time. I
    will tackle this afternoon.

    Meanwhile, I've been thinking about new equipment for a while. The
    Cayman is 5 years old. I might bite the bullet and go with a wireless
    N unit that has dsl and router and everything in one. Do you have any
    recommendations for equipment? I saw a 2wire.com unit yesterday that
    looked interesting and was highly rated on cnet. My concern is this:
    AT&T handles my dsl, and when I move or it goes out (granted, not
    often), they do a really terrible job of getting it going again. (It
    took them two WEEKS to get my dsl installed when I moved.) So I have
    concerns that if I buy equipment from someone other than them that
    they won't have a clue when they do have to come out. Is this a valid
    concern or is the newer equipment semi-idiot-proof?

    Anyway, a bit about my setup: this is for my home office where I spend
    a good bit of time working remotely. Not a whole lot of personal use
    other than the Mac using the wireless to play music. So I need
    reliability as my livelihood depends on it. Thanks again. lenoir
    lenoir, Dec 19, 2007
    #5
  6. lenoir

    Suzy Guest

    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > lenoir wrote:
    >> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    >>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    >>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    >>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    >>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    >>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    >>> your wireless access point.
    >>>
    >>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    >>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    >>> or a wireless router.
    >>>
    >>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>>
    >>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >>> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    >>> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>
    >>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    >>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm-
    >>> Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    >> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    >> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    >> scratch and redo?
    >>
    >> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    >> today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >>
    >> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    >> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    >> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >>
    >> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    >> WAP 54G v.2.
    >>
    >> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >>
    >> Thank you!

    >
    > Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H is,
    > indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    > fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second rather
    > than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per second), but
    > it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that is, your speed
    > limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not your LAN
    > connection).
    >
    > Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    > router.
    >
    > Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    > whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable or
    > by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK when
    > connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to obtain
    > its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or has a
    > static IP address of the correct form for your network.
    >
    > All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of your
    > laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >
    > To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is to
    > access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    > don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    > http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    > take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to take
    > a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through the
    > access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually anything
    > you want without worrying about messing things up as long as you do *not*
    > click the "save settings" button until you really want to make a change.
    >
    > Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an Ethernet
    > cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use your
    > laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.
    >
    > Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This is
    > the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen. The
    > default user name is admin and the default password is admin.
    >
    > If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245, whoever
    > initially setup your system either gave it a different address or (more
    > likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the Cayman router.
    > If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the Linksys Setup
    > Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what IP address has
    > been assigned to the access point.
    >
    > If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name and
    > password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its defaults
    > and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >
    > Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    > successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security." See
    > manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for security
    > mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys devices I've
    > used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you need to do is
    > write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and also make a note
    > of the security mode. It should be either WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or
    > WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note
    > that as well. You could now exit the router's configuration and use this
    > info to set up your wireless laptop.
    >
    > If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set the
    > security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't forget
    > to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >
    > While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should check
    > the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters were set
    > up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect until you
    > add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's list. I
    > suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's not much, if
    > any, of a security addition.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm


    But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How can you
    then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?
    Suzy, Dec 19, 2007
    #6
  7. lenoir

    Lem Guest

    lenoir wrote:
    > On Dec 19, 1:28 am, Lem <> wrote:
    >> lenoir wrote:
    >>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >>>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    >>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    >>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    >>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    >>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    >>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    >>>> your wireless access point.
    >>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    >>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    >>>> or a wireless router.
    >>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >>>> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    >>>> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>>> --
    >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.n...Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    >>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    >>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    >>> scratch and redo?
    >>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    >>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    >>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    >>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    >>> WAP 54G v.2.
    >>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >>> Thank you!

    >> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H
    >> is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    >> fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second
    >> rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per
    >> second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that
    >> is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not
    >> your LAN connection).
    >>
    >> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    >> router.
    >>
    >> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    >> whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable
    >> or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK
    >> when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to
    >> obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or
    >> has a static IP address of the correct form for your network.
    >>
    >> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of
    >> your laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >>
    >> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is
    >> to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    >> don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    >> take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to
    >> take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through
    >> the access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually
    >> anything you want without worrying about messing things up as long as
    >> you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you really want to
    >> make a change.
    >>
    >> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    >> Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use
    >> your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.
    >>
    >> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This
    >> is the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen.
    >> The default user name is admin and the default password is admin.
    >>
    >> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    >> whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different address
    >> or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the
    >> Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the
    >> Linksys Setup Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what
    >> IP address has been assigned to the access point.
    >>
    >> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name
    >> and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its
    >> defaults and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >>
    >> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    >> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    >> See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for
    >> security mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys
    >> devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you
    >> need to do is write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and
    >> also make a note of the security mode. It should be either
    >> WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice
    >> of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note that as well. You could now exit the
    >> router's configuration and use this info to set up your wireless laptop.
    >>
    >> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set
    >> the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't
    >> forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >>
    >> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    >> check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    >> were set up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect
    >> until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's
    >> list. I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's
    >> not much, if any, of a security addition.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > GREAT information and instructions--thanks so much for all your time. I
    > will tackle this afternoon.
    >
    > Meanwhile, I've been thinking about new equipment for a while. The
    > Cayman is 5 years old. I might bite the bullet and go with a wireless
    > N unit that has dsl and router and everything in one. Do you have any
    > recommendations for equipment? I saw a 2wire.com unit yesterday that
    > looked interesting and was highly rated on cnet. My concern is this:
    > AT&T handles my dsl, and when I move or it goes out (granted, not
    > often), they do a really terrible job of getting it going again. (It
    > took them two WEEKS to get my dsl installed when I moved.) So I have
    > concerns that if I buy equipment from someone other than them that
    > they won't have a clue when they do have to come out. Is this a valid
    > concern or is the newer equipment semi-idiot-proof?
    >
    > Anyway, a bit about my setup: this is for my home office where I spend
    > a good bit of time working remotely. Not a whole lot of personal use
    > other than the Mac using the wireless to play music. So I need
    > reliability as my livelihood depends on it. Thanks again. lenoir


    My opinion, and that of at least a few others who regularly post in this
    NG, is that you are generally better off spending a few dollars more in
    the beginning and buying a modem and a router separately, rather than
    getting an all-in-one-box solution.

    Buying a DSL modem yourself, rather than getting it from your ISP, takes
    a bit of information: some ISPs will only operate with certain
    "approved" modems. AFAIK, this is more common with cable than with DSL,
    but I'm not really sure. For more information, you could check out
    http://www.dslreports.com/ where there are FAQs and Forums specific to
    different ISPs. Also see my suggestion at the bottom of this post. In
    addition, there may be certain parameters that need to be configured in
    the modem (in addition to your username and password). In general, your
    ISP tech support line should tell you what these are if you ask.

    As far as whether an AT&T tech could deal with any random DSL modem, the
    odds are that they wouldn't try unless it was on their "approved" list.
    On the other hand, if your DSL service "goes out," the problem
    probably is outside your home and it can be serviced without regard to
    your equipment. At the worst, if a service tech comes to your house,
    he/she should be able to test the line coming into your office and tell
    you whether it's "good" or not. If the line is OK and works with the
    tech's modem but not with yours, you may have to figure it out yourself
    -- but keep the User Guide handy to show the tech. Again, you might
    want to ask this sort of question at a DSLReports forum.

    These days, most wireless routers also include a 100BaseT 4-port
    Ethernet switch, so it's like a combination wired router and wireless
    router. If you need to connect more than 4 devices by Ethernet cable
    (rather than wireless), you can buy an inexpensive switch to add more ports.

    You should be aware that 802.11n is still technically a draft standard.
    It has not been ratified. Thus, there is the *possibility* that an
    802.11n device bought today *might* not be compatible with the standard
    whenever it eventually is ratified. That doesn't seem terribly likely,
    and things appear to have stabilized enough for the industry to begin
    "certifying" 802.11n wireless devices.

    I don't know very much at all about 2wire equipment. The little I have
    heard and seen has not been encouraging.

    I would suggest that you stick with Linksys, D-Link, Netgear, or
    Buffalo. Opinions of others may vary. From posts in this newsgroup,
    the D-Link DIR-655 is a good 802.11n router (it also includes a
    1000BaseT GigaBit switch for its 4 ethernet ports, but at this point in
    the development of Windows operating systems, that's overkill).

    Remember that if you buy anything other than a "vanilla" 802.11g router,
    you will only get increased speed or range (whether it's "SpeedBooster,"
    "Turbo," or draft-N), if you have compatible wireless adapters. If you
    buy a wireless-N router, it will work with your current wireless-g
    laptop, but only at G speeds.

    Finally, if you post a new message in this newsgroup specifically
    directed to your question about "upgrading my old DSL modem and wireless
    access point," you're likely to get more answers.

    Good luck.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Dec 19, 2007
    #7
  8. lenoir

    Lem Guest

    Suzy wrote:
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> lenoir wrote:
    >>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >>>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    >>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro with
    >>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    >>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my wireless-
    >>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    >>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem and
    >>>> your wireless access point.
    >>>>
    >>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem and
    >>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access point
    >>>> or a wireless router.
    >>>>
    >>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>>>
    >>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >>>> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both simultaneously.
    >>>> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>>
    >>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    >>>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm-
    >>>> Hide quoted text -
    >>>>
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    >>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    >>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    >>> scratch and redo?
    >>>
    >>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    >>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >>>
    >>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    >>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    >>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >>>
    >>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    >>> WAP 54G v.2.
    >>>
    >>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >>>
    >>> Thank you!

    >> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H is,
    >> indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    >> fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second rather
    >> than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per second), but
    >> it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that is, your speed
    >> limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not your LAN
    >> connection).
    >>
    >> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    >> router.
    >>
    >> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    >> whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable or
    >> by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK when
    >> connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to obtain
    >> its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or has a
    >> static IP address of the correct form for your network.
    >>
    >> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of your
    >> laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >>
    >> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is to
    >> access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    >> don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    >> http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    >> take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to take
    >> a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through the
    >> access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually anything
    >> you want without worrying about messing things up as long as you do *not*
    >> click the "save settings" button until you really want to make a change.
    >>
    >> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an Ethernet
    >> cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use your
    >> laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.
    >>
    >> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This is
    >> the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen. The
    >> default user name is admin and the default password is admin.
    >>
    >> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245, whoever
    >> initially setup your system either gave it a different address or (more
    >> likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the Cayman router.
    >> If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the Linksys Setup
    >> Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what IP address has
    >> been assigned to the access point.
    >>
    >> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name and
    >> password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its defaults
    >> and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >>
    >> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    >> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security." See
    >> manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for security
    >> mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys devices I've
    >> used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you need to do is
    >> write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and also make a note
    >> of the security mode. It should be either WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or
    >> WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note
    >> that as well. You could now exit the router's configuration and use this
    >> info to set up your wireless laptop.
    >>
    >> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set the
    >> security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't forget
    >> to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >>
    >> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should check
    >> the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters were set
    >> up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect until you
    >> add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's list. I
    >> suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's not much, if
    >> any, of a security addition.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >> http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >
    > But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How can you
    > then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?
    >
    >


    You *can* access a router's configuration utility through a wireless
    connection. The reason it's recommended to do so using an Ethernet
    connection is that as soon as you make a change in the wireless
    configuration (e.g., change the SSID, the encryption mode, or the
    encryption password) and click "save changes" or the like, your wireless
    connection will be severed (because your computer will no longer have
    the proper credentials). You would then have to reconfigure your
    computer as necessary and re-connect. Not impossible, but more of an
    annoyance.

    For example, suppose you hadn't changed the default SSID of your router,
    and were connecting to "linksys" but now wanted to do so. You would
    connect to your "linksys" network, access the router's configuration
    utility, change the SSID to Reindeer, and click "save settings." Now go
    back to "choose a wireless network," find the [new] entry there for the
    "Reindeer" network, and click connect.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Dec 19, 2007
    #8
  9. Hi
    It even worse than annoyance. Cause if any typo or mistake is done during
    the configuration through Wireless you will not be able to log to he Router
    any more.
    The only feasible solution then is to hard reset the Wireless to
    manufacturer default, start from scratch, and hope for a better success the
    second or third time.
    Almost all recent Laptop come with wire or wireless connection.
    Otherwise in case of emergency to make a Laptop being capable to use wire
    takes $12.
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16839130013
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Lem" <> wrote in message
    news:%...
    > Suzy wrote:
    >> "Lem" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >>>>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to connect to
    >>>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro
    >>>>>> with
    >>>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not finish
    >>>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my
    >>>>>> wireless-
    >>>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    >>>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >>>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL modem
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> your wireless access point.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of modem
    >>>>> and
    >>>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >>>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access
    >>>>> point
    >>>>> or a wireless router.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >>>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >>>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >>>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >>>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >>>>> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both
    >>>>> simultaneously.
    >>>>> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>>>>
    >>>>> --
    >>>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>>>
    >>>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    >>>>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm-
    >>>>> Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>
    >>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    >>>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    >>>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    >>>> scratch and redo?
    >>>>
    >>>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    >>>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >>>>
    >>>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    >>>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    >>>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >>>>
    >>>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    >>>> WAP 54G v.2.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thank you!
    >>> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman 322H
    >>> is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't support the
    >>> fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits per second
    >>> rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100 megabits per
    >>> second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary DSL line (that
    >>> is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL connection, not
    >>> your LAN connection).
    >>>
    >>> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not a
    >>> router.
    >>>
    >>> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your LAN
    >>> whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet cable
    >>> or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop works OK
    >>> when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is either set to
    >>> obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and default situation) or
    >>> has a static IP address of the correct form for your network.
    >>>
    >>> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration of
    >>> your laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >>>
    >>> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do is
    >>> to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility. If you
    >>> don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps to
    >>> take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served to
    >>> take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go through
    >>> the access point's configuration utility, you can look at virtually
    >>> anything you want without worrying about messing things up as long as
    >>> you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you really want to
    >>> make a change.
    >>>
    >>> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    >>> Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you use
    >>> your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're done.
    >>>
    >>> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field. This
    >>> is the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login screen.
    >>> The default user name is admin and the default password is admin.
    >>>
    >>> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    >>> whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different address
    >>> or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically from the
    >>> Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is to run the
    >>> Linksys Setup Wizard again. It will scan your network and tell you what
    >>> IP address has been assigned to the access point.
    >>>
    >>> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user name
    >>> and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it to its
    >>> defaults and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >>>
    >>> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    >>> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security." See
    >>> manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for security
    >>> mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the Linksys devices
    >>> I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so, all you need to do
    >>> is write it down (paying attention to capitalization), and also make a
    >>> note of the security mode. It should be either WPA2-Personal,
    >>> WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal. There may also be a choice of "AES" or
    >>> "TKIP". If so, note that as well. You could now exit the router's
    >>> configuration and use this info to set up your wireless laptop.
    >>>
    >>> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just set
    >>> the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security mode, don't
    >>> forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >>>
    >>> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    >>> check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    >>> were set up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't connect
    >>> until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the router's
    >>> list. I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned on. It's
    >>> not much, if any, of a security addition.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>
    >>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>> http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >>
    >> But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How can
    >> you then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?

    >
    > You *can* access a router's configuration utility through a wireless
    > connection. The reason it's recommended to do so using an Ethernet
    > connection is that as soon as you make a change in the wireless
    > configuration (e.g., change the SSID, the encryption mode, or the
    > encryption password) and click "save changes" or the like, your wireless
    > connection will be severed (because your computer will no longer have the
    > proper credentials). You would then have to reconfigure your computer as
    > necessary and re-connect. Not impossible, but more of an annoyance.
    >
    > For example, suppose you hadn't changed the default SSID of your router,
    > and were connecting to "linksys" but now wanted to do so. You would
    > connect to your "linksys" network, access the router's configuration
    > utility, change the SSID to Reindeer, and click "save settings." Now go
    > back to "choose a wireless network," find the [new] entry there for the
    > "Reindeer" network, and click connect.
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 19, 2007
    #9
  10. lenoir

    Lem Guest

    Jack (MVP-Networking). wrote:
    > Hi
    > It even worse than annoyance. Cause if any typo or mistake is done
    > during the configuration through Wireless you will not be able to log to
    > he Router any more.
    > The only feasible solution then is to hard reset the Wireless to
    > manufacturer default, start from scratch, and hope for a better success
    > the second or third time.
    > Almost all recent Laptop come with wire or wireless connection.
    > Otherwise in case of emergency to make a Laptop being capable to use
    > wire takes $12.
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16839130013
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > news:%...
    >> Suzy wrote:
    >>> "Lem" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >>>>>> lenoir wrote:
    >>>>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to
    >>>>>>> connect to
    >>>>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro
    >>>>>>> with
    >>>>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    >>>>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    >>>>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not
    >>>>>>> finish
    >>>>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    >>>>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    >>>>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my
    >>>>>>> wireless-
    >>>>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    >>>>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    >>>>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    >>>>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    >>>>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    >>>>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL
    >>>>>> modem and
    >>>>>> your wireless access point.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of
    >>>>>> modem and
    >>>>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it). Another
    >>>>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access
    >>>>>> point
    >>>>>> or a wireless router.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    >>>>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    >>>>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    >>>>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    >>>>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    >>>>>> utility. You want to use one or the other, but not both
    >>>>>> simultaneously.
    >>>>>> Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> --
    >>>>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    >>>>>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm-
    >>>>>> Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    >>>>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    >>>>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    >>>>> scratch and redo?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    >>>>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    >>>>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    >>>>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    >>>>> WAP 54G v.2.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Thank you!
    >>>> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have. Your Cayman
    >>>> 322H is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router. It doesn't
    >>>> support the fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits
    >>>> per second rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100
    >>>> megabits per second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary
    >>>> DSL line (that is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL
    >>>> connection, not your LAN connection).
    >>>>
    >>>> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not
    >>>> a router.
    >>>>
    >>>> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your
    >>>> LAN whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet
    >>>> cable or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop
    >>>> works OK when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is
    >>>> either set to obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and
    >>>> default situation) or has a static IP address of the correct form
    >>>> for your network.
    >>>>
    >>>> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration
    >>>> of your laptop's NIC is probably OK.
    >>>>
    >>>> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do
    >>>> is to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility.
    >>>> If you don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    >>>> http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps
    >>>> to take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served
    >>>> to take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7. As you go
    >>>> through the access point's configuration utility, you can look at
    >>>> virtually anything you want without worrying about messing things up
    >>>> as long as you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you
    >>>> really want to make a change.
    >>>>
    >>>> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    >>>> Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection. If you
    >>>> use your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're
    >>>> done.
    >>>>
    >>>> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field.
    >>>> This is the default address of the WAP54G. You should see a login
    >>>> screen. The default user name is admin and the default password is
    >>>> admin.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    >>>> whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different
    >>>> address or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically
    >>>> from the Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is
    >>>> to run the Linksys Setup Wizard again. It will scan your network
    >>>> and tell you what IP address has been assigned to the access point.
    >>>>
    >>>> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user
    >>>> name and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it
    >>>> to its defaults and run the setup again. See page 7 of the manual.
    >>>>
    >>>> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    >>>> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    >>>> See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13. You should see a drop-down box for
    >>>> security mode and a box below that for the passphrase. On the
    >>>> Linksys devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear. If so,
    >>>> all you need to do is write it down (paying attention to
    >>>> capitalization), and also make a note of the security mode. It
    >>>> should be either WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal. There
    >>>> may also be a choice of "AES" or "TKIP". If so, note that as well.
    >>>> You could now exit the router's configuration and use this info to
    >>>> set up your wireless laptop.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just
    >>>> set the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security
    >>>> mode, don't forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.
    >>>>
    >>>> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    >>>> check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    >>>> were set up. If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't
    >>>> connect until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the
    >>>> router's list. I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned
    >>>> on. It's not much, if any, of a security addition.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>>
    >>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    >>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>>> http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    >>>
    >>> But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How
    >>> can you then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?

    >>
    >> You *can* access a router's configuration utility through a wireless
    >> connection. The reason it's recommended to do so using an Ethernet
    >> connection is that as soon as you make a change in the wireless
    >> configuration (e.g., change the SSID, the encryption mode, or the
    >> encryption password) and click "save changes" or the like, your
    >> wireless connection will be severed (because your computer will no
    >> longer have the proper credentials). You would then have to
    >> reconfigure your computer as necessary and re-connect. Not
    >> impossible, but more of an annoyance.
    >>
    >> For example, suppose you hadn't changed the default SSID of your
    >> router, and were connecting to "linksys" but now wanted to do so. You
    >> would connect to your "linksys" network, access the router's
    >> configuration utility, change the SSID to Reindeer, and click "save
    >> settings." Now go back to "choose a wireless network," find the [new]
    >> entry there for the "Reindeer" network, and click connect.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >> http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >


    Right you are ... I didn't think about what happens if you make a
    mistake entering info via the wireless link.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Dec 20, 2007
    #10
  11. lenoir

    lenoir Guest

    On Dec 19, 6:23 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    > Jack (MVP-Networking). wrote:
    > > Hi
    > > It even worse than annoyance. Cause if any typo or mistake is done
    > > during the configuration through Wireless you will not be able to log to
    > > he Router any more.
    > > The only feasible solution then is to hard reset the Wireless to
    > > manufacturer default, start from scratch, and hope for a better success
    > > the second or third time.
    > > Almost all recent Laptop come with wire or wireless connection.
    > > Otherwise in case of emergency to make a Laptop being capable to use
    > > wire takes $12.
    > >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16839130013
    > > Jack (MVP-Networking).

    >
    > > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > >news:%...
    > >> Suzy wrote:
    > >>> "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > >>>news:...
    > >>>> lenoir wrote:
    > >>>>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    > >>>>>> lenoir wrote:
    > >>>>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to
    > >>>>>>> connect to
    > >>>>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro
    > >>>>>>> with
    > >>>>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent..
    > >>>>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    > >>>>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not
    > >>>>>>> finish
    > >>>>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    > >>>>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    > >>>>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my
    > >>>>>>> wireless-
    > >>>>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    > >>>>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    > >>>>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    > >>>>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    > >>>>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    > >>>>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL
    > >>>>>> modem and
    > >>>>>> your wireless access point.

    >
    > >>>>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of
    > >>>>>> modem and
    > >>>>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it).  Another
    > >>>>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access
    > >>>>>> point
    > >>>>>> or a wireless router.

    >
    > >>>>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    > >>>>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    > >>>>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    > >>>>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).

    >
    > >>>>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    > >>>>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    > >>>>>> utility.  You want to use one or the other, but not both
    > >>>>>> simultaneously.
    > >>>>>>   Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html

    >
    > >>>>>> --
    > >>>>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > >>>>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    > >>>>>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.n...
    > >>>>>> Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>>>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    > >>>>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    > >>>>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    > >>>>> scratch and redo?

    >
    > >>>>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    > >>>>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.

    >
    > >>>>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    > >>>>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    > >>>>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.

    >
    > >>>>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    > >>>>> WAP 54G v.2.

    >
    > >>>>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.

    >
    > >>>>> Thank you!
    > >>>> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have.  Your Cayman
    > >>>> 322H is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router.  It doesn't
    > >>>> support the fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits
    > >>>> per second rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100
    > >>>> megabits per second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary
    > >>>> DSL line (that is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL
    > >>>> connection, not your LAN connection).

    >
    > >>>> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not
    > >>>> a router.

    >
    > >>>> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your
    > >>>> LAN whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet
    > >>>> cable or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop
    > >>>> works OK when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is
    > >>>> either set to obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and
    > >>>> default situation) or has a static IP address of the correct form
    > >>>> for your network.

    >
    > >>>> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration
    > >>>> of your laptop's NIC is probably OK.

    >
    > >>>> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do
    > >>>> is to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility.  
    > >>>> If you don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    > >>>>http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps
    > >>>> to take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served
    > >>>> to take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7.  As you go
    > >>>> through the access point's configuration utility, you can look at
    > >>>> virtually anything you want without worrying about messing things up
    > >>>> as long as you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you
    > >>>> really want to make a change.

    >
    > >>>> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    > >>>> Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection.  If you
    > >>>> use your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're
    > >>>> done.

    >
    > >>>> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field.  
    > >>>> This is the default address of the WAP54G.  You should see a login
    > >>>> screen. The default user name is admin and the default password is
    > >>>> admin.

    >
    > >>>> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    > >>>> whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different
    > >>>> address or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically
    > >>>> from the Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is
    > >>>> to run the Linksys Setup Wizard again.  It will scan your network
    > >>>> and tell you what IP address has been assigned to the access point.

    >
    > >>>> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user
    > >>>> name and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it
    > >>>> to its defaults and run the setup again.  See page 7 of the manual.

    >
    > >>>> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    > >>>> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    > >>>> See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13.  You should see a drop-down box for
    > >>>> security mode and a box below that for the passphrase.  On the
    > >>>> Linksys devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear.  If so,
    > >>>> all you need to do is write it down (paying attention to
    > >>>> capitalization), and also make a note of the security mode.  It
    > >>>> should be either WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal.  There
    > >>>> may also be a choice of "AES" or "TKIP".  If so, note that as well.  
    > >>>> You could now exit the router's configuration and use this info to
    > >>>> set up your wireless laptop.

    >
    > >>>> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just
    > >>>> set the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security
    > >>>> mode, don't forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.

    >
    > >>>> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    > >>>> check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    > >>>> were set up.  If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't
    > >>>> connect until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the
    > >>>> router's list.  I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned
    > >>>> on.  It's not much, if any, of a security addition.

    >
    > >>>> --
    > >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > >>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    > >>>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >>>>http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >
    > >>> But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How
    > >>> can you then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?

    >
    > >> You *can* access a router's configuration utility through a wireless
    > >> connection.  The reason it's recommended to do so using an Ethernet
    > >> connection is that as soon as you make a change in the wireless
    > >> configuration (e.g., change the SSID, the encryption mode, or the
    > >> encryption password) and click "save changes" or the like, your
    > >> wireless connection will be severed (because your computer will no
    > >> longer have the proper credentials).  You would then have to
    > >> reconfigure your computer as necessary and re-connect.  Not
    > >> impossible, but more of an annoyance.

    >
    > >> For example, suppose you hadn't changed the default SSID of your
    > >> router, and were connecting to "linksys" but now wanted to do so. You
    > >> would connect to your "linksys" network, access the router's
    > >> configuration utility, change the SSID to Reindeer, and click "save
    > >> settings."  Now go back to "choose a wireless network," find the [new]
    > >> entry there for the "Reindeer" network, and click connect.

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    > >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >>http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >
    > Right you are ... I didn't think about what happens if you make a
    > mistake entering info via the wireless link. ...
    >
    > read more »- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I'll definitely use the Ethernet connection!!! Looks like I won't be
    able to get to this until after Christmas, so I'm sure I'll be back
    next week with more questions. Really appreciate all the information.
    Happy Holidays!
    lenoir, Dec 21, 2007
    #11
  12. lenoir

    lenoir Guest

    On Dec 21, 5:28 pm, lenoir <> wrote:
    > On Dec 19, 6:23 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Jack (MVP-Networking). wrote:
    > > > Hi
    > > > It even worse than annoyance. Cause if any typo or mistake is done
    > > > during the configuration through Wireless you will not be able to log to
    > > > he Router any more.
    > > > The only feasible solution then is to hard reset the Wireless to
    > > > manufacturer default, start from scratch, and hope for a better success
    > > > the second or third time.
    > > > Almost all recent Laptop come with wire or wireless connection.
    > > > Otherwise in case of emergency to make a Laptop being capable to use
    > > > wire takes $12.
    > > >http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16839130013
    > > > Jack (MVP-Networking).

    >
    > > > "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > > >news:%...
    > > >> Suzy wrote:
    > > >>> "Lem" <> wrote in message
    > > >>>news:...
    > > >>>> lenoir wrote:
    > > >>>>> On Dec 18, 6:15 pm, Lem <> wrote:
    > > >>>>>> lenoir wrote:
    > > >>>>>>> I have a new Lenovo Thinkpad laptop. Have not been able to
    > > >>>>>>> connect to
    > > >>>>>>> my wireless network yet. Ethernet works great. I'm running XP Pro
    > > >>>>>>> with
    > > >>>>>>> SP2. My wireless is security enabled and the strength is Excellent.
    > > >>>>>>> But I have 'limited or no connectivity'.
    > > >>>>>>> I've tried 'repair' numerous times, and get "Windows could not
    > > >>>>>>> finish
    > > >>>>>>> repairing the problem because the following action could not be
    > > >>>>>>> completed: Renewing your IP address".
    > > >>>>>>> I have a DSL modem that my ethernet cables plug into, then my
    > > >>>>>>> wireless-
    > > >>>>>>> g access point plugs into the modem.
    > > >>>>>>> I have a Mac playing music through an Airport that works off the
    > > >>>>>>> wireless, so I know it works.
    > > >>>>>>> Thanks in advance for any thoughts on getting this ironed out.
    > > >>>>>> Just to be sure we're on the same page with respect to your equipment
    > > >>>>>> and how it's connected, please give the make/model of your DSL
    > > >>>>>> modem and
    > > >>>>>> your wireless access point.

    >
    > > >>>>>> It sounds as if your DSL "modem" is actually a combination of
    > > >>>>>> modem and
    > > >>>>>> router (if multiple Ethernet cables are connected to it).  Another
    > > >>>>>> question is whether your wireless access point is truly an access
    > > >>>>>> point
    > > >>>>>> or a wireless router.

    >
    > > >>>>>> That being said, a common cause of symptoms such as you describe is a
    > > >>>>>> failure to enter your encryption password correctly. Try temporarily
    > > >>>>>> disabling all security mechanisms you configured on your router
    > > >>>>>> (encryption, MAC filtering, other filters).

    >
    > > >>>>>> There also may be a conflict between any wireless configuration
    > > >>>>>> installed by Lenovo and Windows' own Wireless Zero Configuration
    > > >>>>>> utility.  You want to use one or the other, but not both
    > > >>>>>> simultaneously.
    > > >>>>>>   Seehttp://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html

    >
    > > >>>>>> --
    > > >>>>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > > >>>>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of
    > > >>>>>> ROM.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computerhttp://history.n...
    > > >>>>>> Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    > > >>>>> Thanks Lem! It very well could be the password: I had several
    > > >>>>> passwords written down on a piece of paper (from spouse!) and I had to
    > > >>>>> guess at them until connected. Can you tell me how to start from
    > > >>>>> scratch and redo?

    >
    > > >>>>> I had already uninstalled Lenovo's wireless configuration earlier
    > > >>>>> today, so that should no longer be an issue.

    >
    > > >>>>> My husband's laptop is connected just fine; I didn't see any tcp/ip
    > > >>>>> properties that were any different from what I have, so again this may
    > > >>>>> be password related. I'm so excited to have a direction.

    >
    > > >>>>> The modem is a Cayman DSL Router model 3220-H. The wap is a Linksys
    > > >>>>> WAP 54G v.2.

    >
    > > >>>>> I have the Windows firewall enabled FYI.

    >
    > > >>>>> Thank you!
    > > >>>> Thanks for letting me know what equipment you have.  Your Cayman
    > > >>>> 322H is, indeed, a combination DSL modem and router.  It doesn't
    > > >>>> support the fastest Local Area Connection ("10 BaseT" or 10 megabits
    > > >>>> per second rather than the more common (today)"100 BaseT" or 100
    > > >>>> megabits per second), but it still should be faster than an ordinary
    > > >>>> DSL line (that is, your speed limitation would be caused by your DSL
    > > >>>> connection, not your LAN connection).

    >
    > > >>>> Your Linksys WPA54G is a wireless access point, as you said, and not
    > > >>>> a router.

    >
    > > >>>> Because your Cayman provides local IP addresses to computers on your
    > > >>>> LAN whether they are connected directly to the Cayman by an Ethernet
    > > >>>> cable or by wireless through the WPA54G, the fact that your laptop
    > > >>>> works OK when connected by Ethernet cable means that your laptop is
    > > >>>> either set to obtain its IP address automatically (the usual and
    > > >>>> default situation) or has a static IP address of the correct form
    > > >>>> for your network.

    >
    > > >>>> All of the above is a long-winded way of saying that configuration
    > > >>>> of your laptop's NIC is probably OK.

    >
    > > >>>> To deal with wireless password issues, basically what you need to do
    > > >>>> is to access the WAP54G's internal web-based configuration utility.  
    > > >>>> If you don't have the User Guide, you can download it from here:
    > > >>>>http://tinyurl.com/2k94km The following is an overview of the steps
    > > >>>> to take to deal with wireless security, but you would be well-served
    > > >>>> to take a look at the manual, particularly chapter 7.  As you go
    > > >>>> through the access point's configuration utility, you can look at
    > > >>>> virtually anything you want without worrying about messing things up
    > > >>>> as long as you do *not* click the "save settings" button until you
    > > >>>> really want to make a change.

    >
    > > >>>> Do the following from a computer connected to your Cayman with an
    > > >>>> Ethernet cable, rather than one with a wireless connection.  If you
    > > >>>> use your laptop, you can disconnect the Ethernet cable once you're
    > > >>>> done.

    >
    > > >>>> Open a web browser and enter 192.168.1.245 in the address field.  
    > > >>>> This is the default address of the WAP54G.  You should see a login
    > > >>>> screen. The default user name is admin and the default password is
    > > >>>> admin.

    >
    > > >>>> If you don't get a login screen when you browse to 192.168.1.245,
    > > >>>> whoever initially setup your system either gave it a different
    > > >>>> address or (more likely) set it to obtain an address automatically
    > > >>>> from the Cayman router. If this happens, the easiest thing to do is
    > > >>>> to run the Linksys Setup Wizard again.  It will scan your network
    > > >>>> and tell you what IP address has been assigned to the access point.

    >
    > > >>>> If admin/admin doesn't work and you don't remember what the user
    > > >>>> name and password are for the access point, you'll have to reset it
    > > >>>> to its defaults and run the setup again.  See page 7 of the manual.

    >
    > > >>>> Assuming that have accessed the access point's configuration utility
    > > >>>> successfully, click the "Wireless" tab and then "Wireless security."
    > > >>>> See manual page 45, Fig. 7-13.  You should see a drop-down box for
    > > >>>> security mode and a box below that for the passphrase.  On the
    > > >>>> Linksys devices I've used, the passphrase is shown in clear.  If so,
    > > >>>> all you need to do is write it down (paying attention to
    > > >>>> capitalization), and also make a note of the security mode.  It
    > > >>>> should be either WPA2-Personal, WPA2-Mixed, or WPA-Personal.  There
    > > >>>> may also be a choice of "AES" or "TKIP".  If so, note that as well.  
    > > >>>> You could now exit the router's configuration and use this info to
    > > >>>> set up your wireless laptop.

    >
    > > >>>> If you want to clear encryption temporarily from the network, just
    > > >>>> set the security mode to "disabled." If you change the security
    > > >>>> mode, don't forget to click the "save settings" button on your way out.

    >
    > > >>>> While you're in the access point wireless security area, you should
    > > >>>> check the "wireless MAC filter tab" to make sure that no MAC filters
    > > >>>> were set up.  If MAC filtering is turned on, your laptop won't
    > > >>>> connect until you add the MAC address of its wireless adapter to the
    > > >>>> router's list.  I suggest that you not have any MAC filtering turned
    > > >>>> on.  It's not much, if any, of a security addition.

    >
    > > >>>> --
    > > >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > > >>>> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    > > >>>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > > >>>>http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

    >
    > > >>> But what if (like me) there is no Ethernet port on your laptop? How
    > > >>> can you then connect directly to change settings as advised above ?

    >
    > > >> You *can* access a router's configuration utility through a wireless
    > > >> connection.  The reason it's recommended to do so using an Ethernet
    > > >> connection is that as soon as you make a change in the wireless
    > > >> configuration (e.g., change the SSID, the encryption mode, or the
    > > >> encryption password) and click "save changes" or the like, your
    > > >> wireless connection will be severed (because your computer will no
    > > >> longer have the proper credentials).  You would then have to
    > > >> reconfigure your computer as necessary and re-connect.  Not
    > > >> impossible, but more of an annoyance.

    >
    > > >> For example, suppose you hadn't changed the default SSID of your
    > > >> router, and were connecting to "linksys" but now wanted to do so. You
    > > >> would connect to your "linksys" network, access the router's
    > > >> configuration utility, change the SSID to Reindeer, and click "save
    > > >> settings."  Now go back to "choose a wireless network," find the [new]
    > > >> entry there for the "Reindeer" network, and click connect.

    >
    > > >> --
    > > >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    >
    > > >> To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.

    >
    > ...
    >
    > read more »- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I finally got back to this today, and everything WORKED!!! First
    time...I was stunned. Went with wpa instead of wep this time. My
    laptop connected without any issue whatsoever. And it's fast: 2.78 out
    of 3mbps possible. THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU LEM!!!!!

    PS. Now that I'm in charge, all the configuration information is
    recorded in my password vault.
    lenoir, Dec 28, 2007
    #12
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