Wireless Bandwidth and dropped packets

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by HLAMUTHNOSPAM@EARTHLINK.NET, Nov 21, 2008.

  1. Guest

    If someone could enlighten me on the following, I would be
    appreciative. In moving large files...of any kind...of 100MB or more
    across my two computer home wireless network, the recieving PC sooner
    rather than later drops it network connection. I have a wireless
    Linksys router and wireless linksys cards using the N draft protocols.
    Signal to noise is great and "bandwidth" is over 250Mb/sec.

    According to Linksys, that extra bandwidth buys me nothing. I get a
    range improvement, but the transfer protocols (layers?) have not
    scaled. Lots of small files move faster than one large file. Either
    the internal bus speeds in the PCs are limiting what I can transfer,
    or some setting may be wrong. I download from a cable connection
    through the router and can download in excess of 20Mb/s...pretty
    swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    throughput. Huh???

    Any ideas that an ignoramous can understand?

    Thanks

    Henry
    , Nov 21, 2008
    #1
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  2. Hi
    Did you actually measured 250Mb/sec. (I.e. real file transfer of about
    30MB/sec.) or you reporting what the Driver Report statically by default?
    These pages include some general info about the issues.
    http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    http://www.ezlan.net/Internet_Speed.html
    With some Wireless this issue is irresolvable due to quirky hardware driver
    combo.
    However you can try to increase RCwin to x2 times of what is recommended for
    your Internet Connection, it might help.
    Use this application to optimized the TCP/IP stack and deal with RCwin. TCP
    Optimizer - http://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php
    P.S. While I am aware that you are talking about Local Transfer the TCP/IP
    has to be optimized according to the Internet connection otherwise you would
    lose Internet bandwidth. Doubling the RCwin might improve Local Transfer and
    usually do not affect the Internet connection (YMMV).
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If someone could enlighten me on the following, I would be
    > appreciative. In moving large files...of any kind...of 100MB or more
    > across my two computer home wireless network, the recieving PC sooner
    > rather than later drops it network connection. I have a wireless
    > Linksys router and wireless linksys cards using the N draft protocols.
    > Signal to noise is great and "bandwidth" is over 250Mb/sec.
    >
    > According to Linksys, that extra bandwidth buys me nothing. I get a
    > range improvement, but the transfer protocols (layers?) have not
    > scaled. Lots of small files move faster than one large file. Either
    > the internal bus speeds in the PCs are limiting what I can transfer,
    > or some setting may be wrong. I download from a cable connection
    > through the router and can download in excess of 20Mb/s...pretty
    > swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    > collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    > "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    > throughput. Huh???
    >
    > Any ideas that an ignoramous can understand?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Henry
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Nov 21, 2008
    #2
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  3. Guest

    The wireless management client reports this...the popup context window
    with the network icon in the tray. I did mean megabits. It is the
    potential bandwidth. The "real" transfer bandwidth must be much
    smaller. I understand the basic notion of network management, but I
    don't really know how the home networks work. In the olden days, with
    mainframe network management, when traffic took up about 70% of the
    available bandwidth, management issues slowed throughput to zero. It
    is how the information flow scales...not truly bandwidth in an
    electronic sense.

    I will check your links and see if they enlighten me. Like I
    mentioned, it isn't download speeds, it is transfer speeds. I can
    download to either computer at up to 20 Megabytes/sec but if I take a
    large file and move it from one computer to the other, the rates drop
    to...lets see...250MB in 2 min...that is maybe 1.5 - 2 MB/sec transfer
    rate...maybe ten times slower than I might expect an unused link to
    handle. It isn't as though there is a lot of contention for
    bandwidth...or maybe there is.

    I have tested the transfer speed by turning off my security and virus
    protection on the network pc's and all other applications including
    downloads. The rate is just pegged at the ~1.5 MB/sec. Seems slow to
    me.

    Henry

    On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 16:14:15 -0500, "Jack \(MVP-Networking\)."
    <> wrote:

    >Hi
    >Did you actually measured 250Mb/sec. (I.e. real file transfer of about
    >30MB/sec.) or you reporting what the Driver Report statically by default?
    >These pages include some general info about the issues.
    >http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    >http://www.ezlan.net/Internet_Speed.html
    >With some Wireless this issue is irresolvable due to quirky hardware driver
    >combo.
    >However you can try to increase RCwin to x2 times of what is recommended for
    >your Internet Connection, it might help.
    >Use this application to optimized the TCP/IP stack and deal with RCwin. TCP
    >Optimizer - http://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php
    >P.S. While I am aware that you are talking about Local Transfer the TCP/IP
    >has to be optimized according to the Internet connection otherwise you would
    >lose Internet bandwidth. Doubling the RCwin might improve Local Transfer and
    >usually do not affect the Internet connection (YMMV).
    >Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)
    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> If someone could enlighten me on the following, I would be
    >> appreciative. In moving large files...of any kind...of 100MB or more
    >> across my two computer home wireless network, the recieving PC sooner
    >> rather than later drops it network connection. I have a wireless
    >> Linksys router and wireless linksys cards using the N draft protocols.
    >> Signal to noise is great and "bandwidth" is over 250Mb/sec.
    >>
    >> According to Linksys, that extra bandwidth buys me nothing. I get a
    >> range improvement, but the transfer protocols (layers?) have not
    >> scaled. Lots of small files move faster than one large file. Either
    >> the internal bus speeds in the PCs are limiting what I can transfer,
    >> or some setting may be wrong. I download from a cable connection
    >> through the router and can download in excess of 20Mb/s...pretty
    >> swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    >> collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    >> "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    >> throughput. Huh???
    >>
    >> Any ideas that an ignoramous can understand?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Henry
    , Nov 21, 2008
    #3
  4. Guest

    I don't seem to have a reason for a slow network. I downloaded the
    optimizer, used it on both PCs, and if anything have a slower transfer
    rate. I am mystified. I changed the connection speed to reflect my
    true internet connectivity..which was initially showing as quite low
    compared to 15-20Mb/sec. I also have no idea what RcWin is or where to
    find it to check or adjust its setting. Can you help me out there??

    Thanks.

    Henry

    On Fri, 21 Nov 2008 16:14:15 -0500, "Jack \(MVP-Networking\)."
    <> wrote:

    >Hi
    >Did you actually measured 250Mb/sec. (I.e. real file transfer of about
    >30MB/sec.) or you reporting what the Driver Report statically by default?
    >These pages include some general info about the issues.
    >http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    >http://www.ezlan.net/Internet_Speed.html
    >With some Wireless this issue is irresolvable due to quirky hardware driver
    >combo.
    >However you can try to increase RCwin to x2 times of what is recommended for
    >your Internet Connection, it might help.
    >Use this application to optimized the TCP/IP stack and deal with RCwin. TCP
    >Optimizer - http://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php
    >P.S. While I am aware that you are talking about Local Transfer the TCP/IP
    >has to be optimized according to the Internet connection otherwise you would
    >lose Internet bandwidth. Doubling the RCwin might improve Local Transfer and
    >usually do not affect the Internet connection (YMMV).
    >Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)
    >
    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> If someone could enlighten me on the following, I would be
    >> appreciative. In moving large files...of any kind...of 100MB or more
    >> across my two computer home wireless network, the recieving PC sooner
    >> rather than later drops it network connection. I have a wireless
    >> Linksys router and wireless linksys cards using the N draft protocols.
    >> Signal to noise is great and "bandwidth" is over 250Mb/sec.
    >>
    >> According to Linksys, that extra bandwidth buys me nothing. I get a
    >> range improvement, but the transfer protocols (layers?) have not
    >> scaled. Lots of small files move faster than one large file. Either
    >> the internal bus speeds in the PCs are limiting what I can transfer,
    >> or some setting may be wrong. I download from a cable connection
    >> through the router and can download in excess of 20Mb/s...pretty
    >> swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    >> collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    >> "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    >> throughput. Huh???
    >>
    >> Any ideas that an ignoramous can understand?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >>
    >> Henry
    , Nov 22, 2008
    #4
  5. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    > collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    > "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    > throughput. Huh???


    There is no such thing as collisions with wireless. The WAP the nics are
    connected to controls the traffic and "who" can "send" and "when". The Nics
    (unlike with wired) do not decide "on their own" when to send.

    So, whatever the problem is,...it is not collisions.

    These are laptops,...this means there are power-saver features on the
    nics,...maybe the nics are "going to sleep" and not recovering properly.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Phillip Windell, Nov 24, 2008
    #5
  6. Guest

    Interesting. These PCs are desktops, but I get your point. I have
    tried to pause any sleep interuptions like shutting off monitors, etc.
    The issue seems to be when I try and move a folder and not just the
    files in it...I get a message about the path being too deep, which
    tells me it doesn't like folder but then it gags on the files, too.

    What about RWin...what is it and where do I find it within XP, etc??

    Thanks.

    Henry

    On Mon, 24 Nov 2008 14:03:32 -0600, "Phillip Windell"
    <> wrote:

    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> swift. It all gets pokey beyond that. Linksys talks about packet
    >> collisions but has no specific way of fixing things other than to
    >> "slow" the rate down to avoid collisions and thereby improve
    >> throughput. Huh???

    >
    >There is no such thing as collisions with wireless. The WAP the nics are
    >connected to controls the traffic and "who" can "send" and "when". The Nics
    >(unlike with wired) do not decide "on their own" when to send.
    >
    >So, whatever the problem is,...it is not collisions.
    >
    >These are laptops,...this means there are power-saver features on the
    >nics,...maybe the nics are "going to sleep" and not recovering properly.
    , Nov 24, 2008
    #6
  7. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Interesting. These PCs are desktops, but I get your point. I have
    > tried to pause any sleep interuptions like shutting off monitors, etc.


    Desktops have these features too.

    Properties of Network Places
    Properties of "Local Area Connection" (or however you have it named)
    "Configure" Button next to Nic Name
    Power Management Tab
    "Uncheck" the boxes

    > The issue seems to be when I try and move a folder and not just the
    > files in it...I get a message about the path being too deep,


    I don't have an answer for that. Maybe it is telling the truth. Maybe the
    path *is* too deep.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Phillip Windell, Nov 24, 2008
    #7
    1. Advertising

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