Wireless and wired not talking to one another

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by berkyj@gmail.com, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Howdy,

    I hope this is the right group to post to but I couldn't find one
    closer that would match the problem...

    I am having a dilemma involving my wireless access point and my wired
    network talking to one another. Let me explain the layout:

    __ |---|
    |AP|----||---------||---[=switch=]-------|PCs|
    |__| |___|


    Where:
    AP = Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point
    Switch = 10/100 Switch
    || = Wall socket
    PCs = 2x Win XP boxes, 1x Win 2K3 Server

    Basically the wireless AP plugs into a wall point which has a cable run
    through the house to another wall point. From there a patch lead plugs
    into the switch which has other computers connected to it as well as my
    ADSL connection.

    If using it in this configuration the lights on the port in the switch
    that correspond to the Wireless AP just pulse on and off - there is no
    solid connection and therefore no connection to the rest of the
    network. I used a basic cable tester to check that all the cables were
    working correctly both on their own as well as plugged into the wall
    sockets and they are all connected correctly. I then unplugged the
    patch lead for the wireless AP from the switch and plugged it directly
    into my laptop and voila! was able to successfully ping and talk to it
    (even access the web configuration page). I'm assuming at this point
    that the wired connection should be fine.

    Not convinced (because I plugged it back into the switch and it just
    started pulsing again and not connecting to the rest of the network) I
    decided to bypass the above wired diagram and drag out a length of
    cable that I made up as a straight through cable that would run from
    the wireless AP (which is in my roof) to where the switch and other
    pc's are located and this way plug directly into the switch minus the
    wall sockets. I first plugged it directly into one of the pc's and was,
    like the laptop test, able to ping and talk to the wireless AP with no
    dramas. I then plugged it into the switch and plugged the pc back into
    the switch and was able to still talk to it - so success.

    But why? Why does the existing wired network not work the same as this
    new temp cable run? Could it be the multiple wall sockets that are
    causing the issue? I would really like to use the existing wired
    connection rather than string up the temp cable through the house...

    Any ideas/thoughts/suggestions greatly appreciated.

    Cheers
    Bj
    , Aug 31, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Bj,

    When you refer to the wall point, are you talking about a powerline network
    that runs over your house's electrical wiring, or a preexisting CATV system
    in the house?

    You might try testing different speed and duplex settings on your switch and
    access point. When the lights are blinking, it is probably trying to
    autonegotiate speed and/or duplex, and not coming up with a stable setting.
    This can often be resolved by disabling autonegotiate, essentially
    hard-coding the speed and duplex to 100/full, 10/full, or 10/half. If you
    disable autonegotiate on one side of the connection, you should do it on the
    other side as well, but different equipment can sometimes behave oddlly, so
    it doesn't hurt to experiment with all kinds of combinations of settings.

    One thing to keep in mind if you are using powerline is that you essentially
    have 3 link partners as opposed to 1 when you run a direct cable across the
    house.

    Direct cable link partner:
    ----------------------
    1) AP-Switch

    Powerline link partners:
    ----------------------
    1) AP-powerline adapter
    2) powerline adapter-powerline adapter
    3) powerline adapter-switch

    Presumably, the powerline adapters should be able to negotiate a link
    between themselves pretty well, but if the other two links don't negotiate
    exactly the same speed and duplex settings, then there is a mismatch and
    either no connection or an unstable connection is established. When you
    unplug the switch and plug your laptop in, this changes the link partners
    and perhaps they are now able to negotiate the same settings.

    Another test you might try is to replace the access point with a laptop and
    see if this connects to the switch with no problems.

    I hope this helps.

    --
    Greg Lindsay [MSFT]


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
    no rights.

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Howdy,
    >
    > I hope this is the right group to post to but I couldn't find one
    > closer that would match the problem...
    >
    > I am having a dilemma involving my wireless access point and my wired
    > network talking to one another. Let me explain the layout:
    >
    > __ |---|
    > |AP|----||---------||---[=switch=]-------|PCs|
    > |__| |___|
    >
    >
    > Where:
    > AP = Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point
    > Switch = 10/100 Switch
    > || = Wall socket
    > PCs = 2x Win XP boxes, 1x Win 2K3 Server
    >
    > Basically the wireless AP plugs into a wall point which has a cable run
    > through the house to another wall point. From there a patch lead plugs
    > into the switch which has other computers connected to it as well as my
    > ADSL connection.
    >
    > If using it in this configuration the lights on the port in the switch
    > that correspond to the Wireless AP just pulse on and off - there is no
    > solid connection and therefore no connection to the rest of the
    > network. I used a basic cable tester to check that all the cables were
    > working correctly both on their own as well as plugged into the wall
    > sockets and they are all connected correctly. I then unplugged the
    > patch lead for the wireless AP from the switch and plugged it directly
    > into my laptop and voila! was able to successfully ping and talk to it
    > (even access the web configuration page). I'm assuming at this point
    > that the wired connection should be fine.
    >
    > Not convinced (because I plugged it back into the switch and it just
    > started pulsing again and not connecting to the rest of the network) I
    > decided to bypass the above wired diagram and drag out a length of
    > cable that I made up as a straight through cable that would run from
    > the wireless AP (which is in my roof) to where the switch and other
    > pc's are located and this way plug directly into the switch minus the
    > wall sockets. I first plugged it directly into one of the pc's and was,
    > like the laptop test, able to ping and talk to the wireless AP with no
    > dramas. I then plugged it into the switch and plugged the pc back into
    > the switch and was able to still talk to it - so success.
    >
    > But why? Why does the existing wired network not work the same as this
    > new temp cable run? Could it be the multiple wall sockets that are
    > causing the issue? I would really like to use the existing wired
    > connection rather than string up the temp cable through the house...
    >
    > Any ideas/thoughts/suggestions greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Bj
    >
    Greg Lindsay [MSFT], Aug 31, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    G'day Greg,

    Thanks for the reply.

    The wall point is in reference to a pre-existing Cat5 system with RJ45
    jacks and plugs, not the powerline network you mentioned.

    I have tried the last test you mentioned and this worked fine. After
    posting the initial query I realised the problem may be related to the
    Cat5 cabling running through the walls and roof is in too close a
    proximity to the house's power cabling. I am planning on investigating
    this over the next couple of days. If this is the case what would be
    the best form of shielding to place around the Cat5 (rather than
    unclipping it all and re-running it)?

    The switch in question in my network is unfortunately nothing more than
    a glorified hub and as such I have no access to configure individual
    ports or anything such as that.

    Cheers
    Bj

    Greg Lindsay [MSFT] wrote:
    > Bj,
    >
    > When you refer to the wall point, are you talking about a powerline network
    > that runs over your house's electrical wiring, or a preexisting CATV system
    > in the house?
    >
    > You might try testing different speed and duplex settings on your switch and
    > access point. When the lights are blinking, it is probably trying to
    > autonegotiate speed and/or duplex, and not coming up with a stable setting.
    > This can often be resolved by disabling autonegotiate, essentially
    > hard-coding the speed and duplex to 100/full, 10/full, or 10/half. If you
    > disable autonegotiate on one side of the connection, you should do it on the
    > other side as well, but different equipment can sometimes behave oddlly, so
    > it doesn't hurt to experiment with all kinds of combinations of settings.
    >
    > One thing to keep in mind if you are using powerline is that you essentially
    > have 3 link partners as opposed to 1 when you run a direct cable across the
    > house.
    >
    > Direct cable link partner:
    > ----------------------
    > 1) AP-Switch
    >
    > Powerline link partners:
    > ----------------------
    > 1) AP-powerline adapter
    > 2) powerline adapter-powerline adapter
    > 3) powerline adapter-switch
    >
    > Presumably, the powerline adapters should be able to negotiate a link
    > between themselves pretty well, but if the other two links don't negotiate
    > exactly the same speed and duplex settings, then there is a mismatch and
    > either no connection or an unstable connection is established. When you
    > unplug the switch and plug your laptop in, this changes the link partners
    > and perhaps they are now able to negotiate the same settings.
    >
    > Another test you might try is to replace the access point with a laptop and
    > see if this connects to the switch with no problems.
    >
    > I hope this helps.
    >
    > --
    > Greg Lindsay [MSFT]
    >
    >
    > Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
    > no rights.
    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Howdy,
    > >
    > > I hope this is the right group to post to but I couldn't find one
    > > closer that would match the problem...
    > >
    > > I am having a dilemma involving my wireless access point and my wired
    > > network talking to one another. Let me explain the layout:
    > >
    > > __ |---|
    > > |AP|----||---------||---[=switch=]-------|PCs|
    > > |__| |___|
    > >
    > >
    > > Where:
    > > AP = Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point
    > > Switch = 10/100 Switch
    > > || = Wall socket
    > > PCs = 2x Win XP boxes, 1x Win 2K3 Server
    > >
    > > Basically the wireless AP plugs into a wall point which has a cable run
    > > through the house to another wall point. From there a patch lead plugs
    > > into the switch which has other computers connected to it as well as my
    > > ADSL connection.
    > >
    > > If using it in this configuration the lights on the port in the switch
    > > that correspond to the Wireless AP just pulse on and off - there is no
    > > solid connection and therefore no connection to the rest of the
    > > network. I used a basic cable tester to check that all the cables were
    > > working correctly both on their own as well as plugged into the wall
    > > sockets and they are all connected correctly. I then unplugged the
    > > patch lead for the wireless AP from the switch and plugged it directly
    > > into my laptop and voila! was able to successfully ping and talk to it
    > > (even access the web configuration page). I'm assuming at this point
    > > that the wired connection should be fine.
    > >
    > > Not convinced (because I plugged it back into the switch and it just
    > > started pulsing again and not connecting to the rest of the network) I
    > > decided to bypass the above wired diagram and drag out a length of
    > > cable that I made up as a straight through cable that would run from
    > > the wireless AP (which is in my roof) to where the switch and other
    > > pc's are located and this way plug directly into the switch minus the
    > > wall sockets. I first plugged it directly into one of the pc's and was,
    > > like the laptop test, able to ping and talk to the wireless AP with no
    > > dramas. I then plugged it into the switch and plugged the pc back into
    > > the switch and was able to still talk to it - so success.
    > >
    > > But why? Why does the existing wired network not work the same as this
    > > new temp cable run? Could it be the multiple wall sockets that are
    > > causing the issue? I would really like to use the existing wired
    > > connection rather than string up the temp cable through the house...
    > >
    > > Any ideas/thoughts/suggestions greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > Cheers
    > > Bj
    > >
    , Aug 31, 2006
    #3
  4. I'm afraid I'm not too familiar with shielding methods, but I know grounding
    everything makes a huge difference.

    Good luck!

    --
    Greg Lindsay [MSFT]


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers
    no rights.

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > G'day Greg,
    >
    > Thanks for the reply.
    >
    > The wall point is in reference to a pre-existing Cat5 system with RJ45
    > jacks and plugs, not the powerline network you mentioned.
    >
    > I have tried the last test you mentioned and this worked fine. After
    > posting the initial query I realised the problem may be related to the
    > Cat5 cabling running through the walls and roof is in too close a
    > proximity to the house's power cabling. I am planning on investigating
    > this over the next couple of days. If this is the case what would be
    > the best form of shielding to place around the Cat5 (rather than
    > unclipping it all and re-running it)?
    >
    > The switch in question in my network is unfortunately nothing more than
    > a glorified hub and as such I have no access to configure individual
    > ports or anything such as that.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Bj
    >
    > Greg Lindsay [MSFT] wrote:
    >> Bj,
    >>
    >> When you refer to the wall point, are you talking about a powerline
    >> network
    >> that runs over your house's electrical wiring, or a preexisting CATV
    >> system
    >> in the house?
    >>
    >> You might try testing different speed and duplex settings on your switch
    >> and
    >> access point. When the lights are blinking, it is probably trying to
    >> autonegotiate speed and/or duplex, and not coming up with a stable
    >> setting.
    >> This can often be resolved by disabling autonegotiate, essentially
    >> hard-coding the speed and duplex to 100/full, 10/full, or 10/half. If
    >> you
    >> disable autonegotiate on one side of the connection, you should do it on
    >> the
    >> other side as well, but different equipment can sometimes behave oddlly,
    >> so
    >> it doesn't hurt to experiment with all kinds of combinations of settings.
    >>
    >> One thing to keep in mind if you are using powerline is that you
    >> essentially
    >> have 3 link partners as opposed to 1 when you run a direct cable across
    >> the
    >> house.
    >>
    >> Direct cable link partner:
    >> ----------------------
    >> 1) AP-Switch
    >>
    >> Powerline link partners:
    >> ----------------------
    >> 1) AP-powerline adapter
    >> 2) powerline adapter-powerline adapter
    >> 3) powerline adapter-switch
    >>
    >> Presumably, the powerline adapters should be able to negotiate a link
    >> between themselves pretty well, but if the other two links don't
    >> negotiate
    >> exactly the same speed and duplex settings, then there is a mismatch and
    >> either no connection or an unstable connection is established. When you
    >> unplug the switch and plug your laptop in, this changes the link partners
    >> and perhaps they are now able to negotiate the same settings.
    >>
    >> Another test you might try is to replace the access point with a laptop
    >> and
    >> see if this connects to the switch with no problems.
    >>
    >> I hope this helps.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Greg Lindsay [MSFT]
    >>
    >>
    >> Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and
    >> confers
    >> no rights.
    >>
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Howdy,
    >> >
    >> > I hope this is the right group to post to but I couldn't find one
    >> > closer that would match the problem...
    >> >
    >> > I am having a dilemma involving my wireless access point and my wired
    >> > network talking to one another. Let me explain the layout:
    >> >
    >> > __ |---|
    >> > |AP|----||---------||---[=switch=]-------|PCs|
    >> > |__| |___|
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > Where:
    >> > AP = Linksys WAP54G Wireless Access Point
    >> > Switch = 10/100 Switch
    >> > || = Wall socket
    >> > PCs = 2x Win XP boxes, 1x Win 2K3 Server
    >> >
    >> > Basically the wireless AP plugs into a wall point which has a cable run
    >> > through the house to another wall point. From there a patch lead plugs
    >> > into the switch which has other computers connected to it as well as my
    >> > ADSL connection.
    >> >
    >> > If using it in this configuration the lights on the port in the switch
    >> > that correspond to the Wireless AP just pulse on and off - there is no
    >> > solid connection and therefore no connection to the rest of the
    >> > network. I used a basic cable tester to check that all the cables were
    >> > working correctly both on their own as well as plugged into the wall
    >> > sockets and they are all connected correctly. I then unplugged the
    >> > patch lead for the wireless AP from the switch and plugged it directly
    >> > into my laptop and voila! was able to successfully ping and talk to it
    >> > (even access the web configuration page). I'm assuming at this point
    >> > that the wired connection should be fine.
    >> >
    >> > Not convinced (because I plugged it back into the switch and it just
    >> > started pulsing again and not connecting to the rest of the network) I
    >> > decided to bypass the above wired diagram and drag out a length of
    >> > cable that I made up as a straight through cable that would run from
    >> > the wireless AP (which is in my roof) to where the switch and other
    >> > pc's are located and this way plug directly into the switch minus the
    >> > wall sockets. I first plugged it directly into one of the pc's and was,
    >> > like the laptop test, able to ping and talk to the wireless AP with no
    >> > dramas. I then plugged it into the switch and plugged the pc back into
    >> > the switch and was able to still talk to it - so success.
    >> >
    >> > But why? Why does the existing wired network not work the same as this
    >> > new temp cable run? Could it be the multiple wall sockets that are
    >> > causing the issue? I would really like to use the existing wired
    >> > connection rather than string up the temp cable through the house...
    >> >
    >> > Any ideas/thoughts/suggestions greatly appreciated.
    >> >
    >> > Cheers
    >> > Bj
    >> >

    >
    Greg Lindsay [MSFT], Aug 31, 2006
    #4
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