WIRELESS AND Wi-Fi

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Dec 25, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?

    I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?

    Is this just semantics?

    Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??

    These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    with notebooka.

    THANK YOU!!!!!

    Goob
    --
    ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Dec 25, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Aloha goobmeister,

    Technically wi-fi is not the same as "wireless" but in practice they are
    often used interchangably. This article may help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi


    Wi-fi is a wireless technology, yes, but not exactly a synonym.

    As for why do people subscribe to T-Mobile and such the reason is that to
    connect to the Internet via wireless you have to be able to connect to a
    wireless access point. Sometimes you can find an open wireless access point
    (WAP) that requires no credentials to log into it -- that can either be an
    accident (somebody installed a WAP and didn't secure it) or intentional (somebody
    installed a WAP they deliberately left open to allow free access). But in
    many cases the only WAP(s) you'll be able to connect to are going to require
    some kind of authorization to actually use.

    T-Mobile (and others) offer WAPs in many places (coffee houses, airports,
    etc.) that are like that. You can connect to them, but in order to actually
    use them you'll have to subscribe. Then you can log in with the account
    they provide (which you've paid for) and use them.

    Depending upon how often you travel (and where) you may find such a subscription
    valuable. Also most of those services offer 1 day or part-day subscriptions
    for a reduced rate (4 hours for $6.99 or something like that).

    -Ben-
    Ben M. Schorr - MVP
    Roland Schorr & Tower
    http://www.rolandschorr.com
    Microsoft OneNote FAQ: http://www.factplace.com/onenotefaq.htm

    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new
    > wireless-capable notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and
    > wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on
    > the Net in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start
    > at the beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop
    > wireless, but never with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    >
     
    Ben M. Schorr - MVP, Dec 25, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Hi
    Read this first, http://www.ezlan.net/faq#terms
    The method that allows to create local Wireless network, and use it to
    connect to the Internet through you own Wireless Router/AP source (or
    hotspot in Internet Café etc.), is the common Wireless Installed in most
    Laptop.
    The current standard is referred too as 802.11 b/g.
    If a manufacturer want his 802.11b/g hardware to be certified, he can submit
    it to an organization that certified Wireless hardware, if it pass the
    tests, it can be officially called WIFI.
    Most Entry Level hardware is Not certified as WIFi because it is expensive
    and a time consuming process.
    Not being certified does not mean that it is Not compatible. Current 802.11
    b/g hardware work together whether they are WIFI certified or not.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    > Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    > the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 25, 2006
    #3
  4. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    David Hettel Guest

    Wireless covers a number of technologies. Wi-Fi would be consider wireless,
    but wireless would not necessarily be Wi-Fi. A wireless notebook could have
    a built-in cellular connection, that would allow one to connect anywhere
    there is a cellular signal. Wi-Fi requires an access point or an Ad-hoc
    connection, these are relative short range generally within 300 feet or
    less. Within a home their range is often less than 50 feet. Bluetooth is
    another form of wireless, that may connect your notebook to a mouse, a
    headset, a PDA, a cell phone on a LAN. Bluetooth range is very limited
    generally 10 to 30 feet.

    There is lots of chatter about Free Hotspots, truth is unless you happen to
    be in one of a few select cities or spend lots of time in airports, this is
    often more talk than reality, Most people use Wi-Fi at home, and while
    staying in a motel or hotel. T-mobile offers connections at airports and
    coffee shops for a fee.

    --
    David Hettel

    Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group for everyone
    to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions addressed directly to me in
    E-mail or news groups.

    Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com

    DISCLAIMER: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranty of any kind,
    either expressed or implied, made in relation to the accuracy, reliability
    or content of this post. The author shall not be liable for any direct,
    indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of, or
    inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this post and confers
    no rights.



    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    > Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    > the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    David Hettel, Dec 25, 2006
    #4
  5. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    Rich Guest

    On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 12:54:00 -0800, goobmeister
    <> wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    >notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    >I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    >anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    >Is this just semantics?


    in this context, yes.

    >Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    >accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    >in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??


    wi-fi is merely another method for distributing a high-speed internet
    (broadband) connection. someone has to pay for that connection as
    well as for the wi-fi hardware to distribute that connection. some
    vendors like panera bread, the holiday inn and the local RV park build
    the cost of the broadband connection and wi-fi hardware infrastructure
    into the cost of whatever goods or services they are peddling. this
    allows them to offer "free" wi-fi to their customers. your wi-fi
    enabled laptop CAN get onto the net through ANY wi-fi hot spot
    provided the owner of the system has either made that connection open
    and unencrypted or provided you with the login parameters.

    the t-mobile wireless access is not wi-fi in this context. tmobile
    (as well as cingular, verizon, sprint, earthlink and others) offer
    wireless access thru their cellular phone infrastructure. for this
    they charge a monthly fee. access to this type of wireless is done
    either by tethering your cellphone to your laptop or by using an
    'aircard' that slips into your PCMCIA or ExpressCard slot on your
    laptop.

    when you're using a wi-fi connection whatever company is providing the
    broadband access to the wi-fi network is your ISP. if you're using a
    wireless connection such as tmobile or verizon then tmobile or verizon
    is your ISP. there are ways to use a wireless connection without
    subscribing to a data plan (backdoor access). more information on
    that can be had at
    <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/InternetByCellPhone/>

    >These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    >beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    >with notebooka.
    >
    >THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    >Goob


    73,
    rich, n9dko
     
    Rich, Dec 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Hi

    It is just getting more confusing.

    The term WIFI by itself is meaningless.

    For functional purposes the word WIFI should be dropped (or suggested to be
    dropped) when some one need explanation.

    Read slowly: "Wi-Fi (also WiFi, wifi, etc.) is a brand originally licensed
    by the Wi-Fi Alliance® to describe the underlying technology of wireless
    local area networks (WLAN) based on the IEEE 802.11".

    The above is a quote from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi

    It is important to explain/understand the specific technology that the user,
    have, intend, or need to get.

    As an Example to State that "wi-fi is merely another method for distributing
    a high-speed internet (broadband) connection", is incorrect. There are few
    methods to distribute the Internet through Wireless and some of them use
    2.4GHz hardware, but it has nothing to do with 802.11Wireless certification.

    Jack (MVP-Networking).



    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    > Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    > the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 26, 2006
    #6
  7. THANK YOU!

    All of the replies are marvelously helpful and gratefully appreciated. Now
    I'm more confused than ever! But not in a bad way...what I'm getting is that
    I'll be able to access WAPs that aren't secured, such as at airports, for no
    charge, but only be able to access WAPs that ARE secured, such as at coffee
    houses like Starbucks, through a paid subscription -- T-Mobile for example.

    I'm also getting (guessing?) that the mobile Centrino technology with the M
    processor, first introduced by Intel, is what I'll want for my laptop as a
    minimum so I don't have to play with a wireless card for my PCMCIA slot?
    Then I really go out on a limb and assume (ugh!) that the new core 2 duo
    technology, if I can afford that processor, will give me at least what the M
    processor can?

    How am I doing so far?

    THANKS in advance!

    Goob
    --
    ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister


    "goobmeister" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Dec 26, 2006
    #7
  8. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    David Hettel Guest

    You're doing good so far. As to built-in or by PCMCIA cards (actually
    cardbus a newer version of PCMCIA it's hard to impossible to find new PCMCIA
    Wi-Fi cards and cardbus cards will not operate in older PCMCIA only slots.)
    either way you'll need to play. Most cardbus cards will cover two slots or
    block the top slot if use in the bottom slot of stack slots. Generally the
    cardbus cards will give the fastest connection and also the greatest range.
    The newest IBM laptops just started shipping with "N" type radios but the
    current drivers do not permit bonding two channels for maximum throughput.
    Cardbus N cards have been doing this for months. Also unless your notebook
    comes with a WAN card you'll not be able to connect to cellular network with
    a built-in Wi-Fi card. WAN (Cellular) is not the same as Wi-Fi. T-mobile
    offers two different services a Wi-Fi plan that is available in some
    airports, restaurants, and coffee houses, and a cellular plan. Getting one
    does not mean you have the other. There are a number of ways of making any
    of these connections, with a number of different hardware devices.

    --
    David Hettel

    Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group for everyone
    to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions addressed directly to me in
    E-mail or news groups.

    Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com

    DISCLAIMER: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranty of any kind,
    either expressed or implied, made in relation to the accuracy, reliability
    or content of this post. The author shall not be liable for any direct,
    indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of, or
    inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this post and confers
    no rights.



    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > THANK YOU!
    >
    > All of the replies are marvelously helpful and gratefully appreciated.
    > Now
    > I'm more confused than ever! But not in a bad way...what I'm getting is
    > that
    > I'll be able to access WAPs that aren't secured, such as at airports, for
    > no
    > charge, but only be able to access WAPs that ARE secured, such as at
    > coffee
    > houses like Starbucks, through a paid subscription -- T-Mobile for
    > example.
    >
    > I'm also getting (guessing?) that the mobile Centrino technology with the
    > M
    > processor, first introduced by Intel, is what I'll want for my laptop as a
    > minimum so I don't have to play with a wireless card for my PCMCIA slot?
    > Then I really go out on a limb and assume (ugh!) that the new core 2 duo
    > technology, if I can afford that processor, will give me at least what the
    > M
    > processor can?
    >
    > How am I doing so far?
    >
    > THANKS in advance!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
    >
    >
    > "goobmeister" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    >> notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >>
    >> I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    >> anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >>
    >> Is this just semantics?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    >> accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    >> Net
    >> in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >>
    >> These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    >> the
    >> beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but
    >> never
    >> with notebooka.
    >>
    >> THANK YOU!!!!!
    >>
    >> Goob
    >> --
    >> ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    David Hettel, Dec 26, 2006
    #8
  9. Hi
    From a point of view of Wireless it does not matter so much what you have
    (Duo Core or not means nothing to Wireless, and Networking). Even old slow
    Laptop do very wel,l as long as they Have a good 802.11 b/g card intstalled.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > THANK YOU!
    >
    > All of the replies are marvelously helpful and gratefully appreciated.
    > Now
    > I'm more confused than ever! But not in a bad way...what I'm getting is
    > that
    > I'll be able to access WAPs that aren't secured, such as at airports, for
    > no
    > charge, but only be able to access WAPs that ARE secured, such as at
    > coffee
    > houses like Starbucks, through a paid subscription -- T-Mobile for
    > example.
    >
    > I'm also getting (guessing?) that the mobile Centrino technology with the
    > M
    > processor, first introduced by Intel, is what I'll want for my laptop as a
    > minimum so I don't have to play with a wireless card for my PCMCIA slot?
    > Then I really go out on a limb and assume (ugh!) that the new core 2 duo
    > technology, if I can afford that processor, will give me at least what the
    > M
    > processor can?
    >
    > How am I doing so far?
    >
    > THANKS in advance!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
    >
    >
    > "goobmeister" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    >> notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >>
    >> I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    >> anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >>
    >> Is this just semantics?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    >> accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    >> Net
    >> in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >>
    >> These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    >> the
    >> beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but
    >> never
    >> with notebooka.
    >>
    >> THANK YOU!!!!!
    >>
    >> Goob
    >> --
    >> ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 26, 2006
    #9
  10. Thank you again ever so much! The best answers, which I'm definitely getting
    here, always seem to raise more questions :()

    One reference is made to "a good 802.11 b/g card intstalled." Who
    manufactures such a card? Belkin, Netgear, et al?

    I currently have a wired cable modem (mfr. Ambit) which I suppose I would
    have to replace with a wireless router? I have an older D-Link model with a
    PCI antenna because there once were two desktops communicating wirelessly
    with the router, including a printer, but I'd like to go with a newer router
    so I can use the notebook at home wirelessly while my desktop continues to
    use its wired connection.

    During my reading of the suggested links, I came across a site named Boingo
    which charges a fee for their software to, among other things, sniff out
    hotspots. Any opinions, other suggestions, about that type of technology?

    Seems my one issue still bugging concerns the following, and I quote:

    "unless your notebook comes with a WAN card you'll not be able to connect to
    cellular network with a built-in Wi-Fi card. WAN (Cellular) is not the same
    as Wi-Fi. T-mobile offers two different services a Wi-Fi plan that is
    available in some airports, restaurants, and coffee houses, and a cellular
    plan. Getting one does not mean you have the other. There are a number of
    ways of making any of these connections, with a number of different hardware
    devices."

    Thank you again, in advance, for any assistance : )

    Happy Holidays,

    Goob
    --
    ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister


    "goobmeister" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Dec 26, 2006
    #10
  11. Hi

    Wireless 802.11 b/g is what you are going to use at home to connect to the
    your LAN.

    If the Network is also connected to the Internet (usually with Modem and
    Wireless Cable/DSL Router) the 802/11 b/g card provide Wireless connection
    to the Internet.

    Most Hot Spot are based on 802.11 b/g since 98% of people who have Wireless
    Laptops have 802.11 b/g.

    Some Hot Spot are free, and some are not but almost all use 802.11 b/g.

    However when some one goes on the road and need to ensure Internet
    connection independent of Hot Spot, you can get a Cellular Internet Card. A
    cellular card works with the Cellular phone system and provide directly
    Internet to the Laptop (sort of Wireless Dialup Internet), it is costly and
    slow but for some one on the road it migh very valuable.

    At the moment, you are going in circles for nothing, you need to get 802.11
    b/g capable Laptop get one and continue from there. If you would find in
    the future that you need additional forms of Wireless you would get what
    ever specifically fits your needs at the time, and would plug it into Laptop
    as a PCMCIA Card.

    Leave Boingo alone it is not of real value if you use Windows XP.

    If later On you need some thing specific, you can always get additional
    Boingo, or what ever else.

    Otherwise you are like some one who needs an apartment in New York, and are
    asking about apartments in LA (after all who knows may be one day you would
    move to LA).

    Wireless Hardware - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Hardware.html

    My New Wireless does not work - http://www.ezlan.net/wireless.html

    Wireless, Basic Configuration - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html

    Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    Jack (MVP-Networking).



    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thank you again ever so much! The best answers, which I'm definitely
    > getting
    > here, always seem to raise more questions :()
    >
    > One reference is made to "a good 802.11 b/g card intstalled." Who
    > manufactures such a card? Belkin, Netgear, et al?
    >
    > I currently have a wired cable modem (mfr. Ambit) which I suppose I would
    > have to replace with a wireless router? I have an older D-Link model with
    > a
    > PCI antenna because there once were two desktops communicating wirelessly
    > with the router, including a printer, but I'd like to go with a newer
    > router
    > so I can use the notebook at home wirelessly while my desktop continues to
    > use its wired connection.
    >
    > During my reading of the suggested links, I came across a site named
    > Boingo
    > which charges a fee for their software to, among other things, sniff out
    > hotspots. Any opinions, other suggestions, about that type of technology?
    >
    > Seems my one issue still bugging concerns the following, and I quote:
    >
    > "unless your notebook comes with a WAN card you'll not be able to connect
    > to
    > cellular network with a built-in Wi-Fi card. WAN (Cellular) is not the
    > same
    > as Wi-Fi. T-mobile offers two different services a Wi-Fi plan that is
    > available in some airports, restaurants, and coffee houses, and a cellular
    > plan. Getting one does not mean you have the other. There are a number of
    > ways of making any of these connections, with a number of different
    > hardware
    > devices."
    >
    > Thank you again, in advance, for any assistance : )
    >
    > Happy Holidays,
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
    >
    >
    > "goobmeister" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    >> notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >>
    >> I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    >> anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >>
    >> Is this just semantics?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    >> accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    >> Net
    >> in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >>
    >> These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    >> the
    >> beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but
    >> never
    >> with notebooka.
    >>
    >> THANK YOU!!!!!
    >>
    >> Goob
    >> --
    >> ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 26, 2006
    #11
  12. Thank you for all the hard work and your time to help me, which you have
    greatly : ) It did feel like I was going in circles, so now I can
    concentrate on purchasing the laptop. The analogy to NYC and LA is
    humorously ironic considering that I live very near LA (and once lived in
    Manhattan's Upper East Side)!!

    Goob
    --
    ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister


    "goobmeister" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Dec 26, 2006
    #12
  13. "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > It is just getting more confusing.

    ............
    > As an Example to State that "wi-fi is merely another method for distributing
    > a high-speed internet (broadband) connection", is incorrect. There are few
    > methods to distribute the Internet through Wireless and some of them use
    > 2.4GHz hardware, but it has nothing to do with 802.11Wireless certification.


    Yep, it is confusing. Practically, Wi-Fi means "802.11 family network device
    certified by a Wi-Fi Alliance authorized lab". There are several kinds of
    802.11, some work in the 2.4 Ghz band, and some in 5 Ghz.
    802.11 devces may be used for internet access, or for anything else (for
    example, for LAN, VOIP or P2P data connection).

    Another wireless options are all types of cellular data and the
    emerging WiMAX (802.16) which usage is very similar to cellular.
    Both are referred to as "Wireless WAN" and
    always require subscription to the service.
    They can not make LAN or peer-to-peer connection.

    Other wireless that can be used for networking or internet access (BT, UWB
    ....)
    are definitely not related to Wi-Fi.

    Hope this is clearer now...
    Regards,
    --PA
     
    =?Utf-8?B?UGF2ZWwgQS4=?=, Dec 26, 2006
    #13
  14. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    Rich Guest

    On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 17:00:01 -0800, goobmeister
    <> wrote:

    >THANK YOU!
    >
    >All of the replies are marvelously helpful and gratefully appreciated. Now
    >I'm more confused than ever! But not in a bad way...what I'm getting is that
    >I'll be able to access WAPs that aren't secured, such as at airports, for no
    >charge,


    correct

    > but only be able to access WAPs that ARE secured, such as at coffee
    >houses like Starbucks, through a paid subscription -- T-Mobile for example.


    partly. starbucks and others like it MAY require a password (which
    would be given to you when you buy whatever they're selling) or not
    but it has nothing to do with tmobile.

    tmobile (and verizon, sprint and other cellular companies) SELL
    wireless internet access that uses their cellular phone network. if
    you're in range of one of their towers then you'd have access. and to
    acess their wireless systems you need a specific type of card from
    whatever company you're subscribing to.

    the generic term 'wi-fi' uses as it's pathway to the net DSL,
    satellite or cable broadband. to access a 'wi-fi' system all you need
    is a generic 'wi-fi' card (built-in to your pc or added via USB or
    PCMCIA/ExpressCard slot). 'wi-fi' and wireless are similar in that
    you're accessing the net wirelessly but they each use different
    technologies to get you there.

    >I'm also getting (guessing?) that the mobile Centrino technology with the M
    >processor, first introduced by Intel, is what I'll want for my laptop as a
    >minimum so I don't have to play with a wireless card for my PCMCIA slot?


    that would be one option. in most 'wi-fi' systems you should have no
    problem accessing the signal with a built-in wi-fi card. in weak
    signal areas (campgrounds, rv parks, etc) many folks use USB adaptors
    or PCMCIA/ExpressCard slot cards to which an external antenna can be
    attached for increased range.

    not all built-in 'wi-fi' cards are created equal. if you're buying a
    dell laptop avoid the dell wi-fi card and spring the extra few bucks
    for the intel card.

    >Then I really go out on a limb and assume (ugh!) that the new core 2 duo
    >technology, if I can afford that processor, will give me at least what the M
    >processor can?
    >
    >How am I doing so far?
    >
    >THANKS in advance!
    >
    >Goob


    73,
    rich, n9dko
     
    Rich, Dec 26, 2006
    #14
  15. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    Rich Guest

    On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 18:30:00 -0800, goobmeister
    <> wrote:

    >Thank you again ever so much! The best answers, which I'm definitely getting
    >here, always seem to raise more questions :()
    >
    >One reference is made to "a good 802.11 b/g card intstalled." Who
    >manufactures such a card? Belkin, Netgear, et al?


    i recommend the intel PRO/Wireless 2200BG Network Card. the 'b/g'
    refers to the type of 'wi-fi' network it will connect to (802.11b OR
    802.11g...b/g)

    belkin, netgear, USR (my preference) and others mfg the add-on type
    cards.

    >I currently have a wired cable modem (mfr. Ambit) which I suppose I would
    >have to replace with a wireless router? I have an older D-Link model with a
    >PCI antenna because there once were two desktops communicating wirelessly
    >with the router, including a printer, but I'd like to go with a newer router
    >so I can use the notebook at home wirelessly while my desktop continues to
    >use its wired connection.
    >
    >During my reading of the suggested links, I came across a site named Boingo
    >which charges a fee for their software to, among other things, sniff out
    >hotspots. Any opinions, other suggestions, about that type of technology?


    don't buy any 'sniffing' software. there are freebies that do the
    same job including the software that comes with the built-in cards.

    >Seems my one issue still bugging concerns the following, and I quote:
    >
    >"unless your notebook comes with a WAN card you'll not be able to connect to
    >cellular network with a built-in Wi-Fi card. WAN (Cellular) is not the same
    >as Wi-Fi. T-mobile offers two different services a Wi-Fi plan that is
    >available in some airports, restaurants, and coffee houses, and a cellular
    >plan. Getting one does not mean you have the other. There are a number of
    >ways of making any of these connections, with a number of different hardware
    >devices."
    >
    >Thank you again, in advance, for any assistance : )
    >
    >Happy Holidays,
    >
    >Goob


    73,
    rich, n9dko
     
    Rich, Dec 26, 2006
    #15
  16. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    David Hettel Guest

    Rich this is the second time you've attempt to correct something I've said.
    Please don't do it again. T-Mobile does offer Wi-Fi plans. You'll need their
    plan at Borders, American Airlines Admirals Club, and StarBucks to name just
    a few. In fact they offer the worlds largest private Wi-Fi network. And I
    believe you'll find that Starbucks will not "give" you a password, they will
    however "sell" you a T-mobile account. T-mobile is also into the Wi-Fi
    business, all you need is a Wi-Fi card and an account.

    As I have stated most cards are Cardbus cards they are not PCMCIA cards or
    ExpressCards. PCMCIA cards will fit and work in a Cardbus slot, Cardbus
    cards do not fit into a PCMCIA slot and will not work in such a slot. An
    ExpressCard is not compatible with a PCMCIA or Cardbus slot mechanically.
    You supplied a lot of your beliefs, unfortunately much of your thrust has
    been wrong.

    --
    David Hettel

    Please post any reply as a follow-up message in the news group for everyone
    to see. I'm sorry, but I don't answer questions addressed directly to me in
    E-mail or news groups.

    Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Program
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com

    DISCLAIMER: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranty of any kind,
    either expressed or implied, made in relation to the accuracy, reliability
    or content of this post. The author shall not be liable for any direct,
    indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the use of, or
    inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this post and confers
    no rights.



    "Rich" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 17:00:01 -0800, goobmeister
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>THANK YOU!
    >>
    >>All of the replies are marvelously helpful and gratefully appreciated.
    >>Now
    >>I'm more confused than ever! But not in a bad way...what I'm getting is
    >>that
    >>I'll be able to access WAPs that aren't secured, such as at airports, for
    >>no
    >>charge,

    >
    > correct
    >
    >> but only be able to access WAPs that ARE secured, such as at coffee
    >>houses like Starbucks, through a paid subscription -- T-Mobile for
    >>example.

    >
    > partly. starbucks and others like it MAY require a password (which
    > would be given to you when you buy whatever they're selling) or not
    > but it has nothing to do with tmobile.
    >
    > tmobile (and verizon, sprint and other cellular companies) SELL
    > wireless internet access that uses their cellular phone network. if
    > you're in range of one of their towers then you'd have access. and to
    > acess their wireless systems you need a specific type of card from
    > whatever company you're subscribing to.
    >
    > the generic term 'wi-fi' uses as it's pathway to the net DSL,
    > satellite or cable broadband. to access a 'wi-fi' system all you need
    > is a generic 'wi-fi' card (built-in to your pc or added via USB or
    > PCMCIA/ExpressCard slot). 'wi-fi' and wireless are similar in that
    > you're accessing the net wirelessly but they each use different
    > technologies to get you there.
    >
    >>I'm also getting (guessing?) that the mobile Centrino technology with the
    >>M
    >>processor, first introduced by Intel, is what I'll want for my laptop as a
    >>minimum so I don't have to play with a wireless card for my PCMCIA slot?

    >
    > that would be one option. in most 'wi-fi' systems you should have no
    > problem accessing the signal with a built-in wi-fi card. in weak
    > signal areas (campgrounds, rv parks, etc) many folks use USB adaptors
    > or PCMCIA/ExpressCard slot cards to which an external antenna can be
    > attached for increased range.
    >
    > not all built-in 'wi-fi' cards are created equal. if you're buying a
    > dell laptop avoid the dell wi-fi card and spring the extra few bucks
    > for the intel card.
    >
    >>Then I really go out on a limb and assume (ugh!) that the new core 2 duo
    >>technology, if I can afford that processor, will give me at least what the
    >>M
    >>processor can?
    >>
    >>How am I doing so far?
    >>
    >>THANKS in advance!
    >>
    >>Goob

    >
    > 73,
    > rich, n9dko
    >
     
    David Hettel, Dec 26, 2006
    #16
  17. Hi
    LOL, I guess that next time I should choose cities in Tibet.
    The Upper East Side is still good to me.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "goobmeister" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thank you for all the hard work and your time to help me, which you have
    > greatly : ) It did feel like I was going in circles, so now I can
    > concentrate on purchasing the laptop. The analogy to NYC and LA is
    > humorously ironic considering that I live very near LA (and once lived in
    > Manhattan's Upper East Side)!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
    >
    >
    > "goobmeister" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    >> notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >>
    >> I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    >> anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >>
    >> Is this just semantics?
    >>
    >> Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    >> accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the
    >> Net
    >> in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >>
    >> These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at
    >> the
    >> beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but
    >> never
    >> with notebooka.
    >>
    >> THANK YOU!!!!!
    >>
    >> Goob
    >> --
    >> ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Dec 26, 2006
    #17
  18. =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=

    Rich Guest

    On Mon, 25 Dec 2006 17:10:37 -0500, "David Hettel"
    <> wrote:

    >Wireless covers a number of technologies. Wi-Fi would be consider wireless,
    >but wireless would not necessarily be Wi-Fi. A wireless notebook could have
    >a built-in cellular connection, that would allow one to connect anywhere
    >there is a cellular signal. Wi-Fi requires an access point or an Ad-hoc
    >connection, these are relative short range generally within 300 feet or
    >less. Within a home their range is often less than 50 feet. Bluetooth is
    >another form of wireless, that may connect your notebook to a mouse, a
    >headset, a PDA, a cell phone on a LAN. Bluetooth range is very limited
    >generally 10 to 30 feet.
    >
    >There is lots of chatter about Free Hotspots, truth is unless you happen to
    >be in one of a few select cities or spend lots of time in airports, this is
    >often more talk than reality, Most people use Wi-Fi at home, and while
    >staying in a motel or hotel. T-mobile offers connections at airports and
    >coffee shops for a fee.


    at the risk of you believing that i am "correcting" you again, which i
    am not, we have traveled much of the country in our RV and have found,
    and used, many, many intentionally legally open, free and unsecured
    wi-fi hot spots. libraries, city halls, campgrounds, retail
    businesses, etc. some states are even providing free wi-fi access at
    rest stops (iowa and texas for sure, illinois sometime in 2007...there
    may be othes). some open sports allow anyone to access (i know
    because we've asked...it's amazing what can happen when one asks
    permission) while others ask that you buy their goods or services.
    some of the latter will provide a password at the register or on the
    receipt as a way of keeping freeloaders off but those doing this that
    i have encountered don't seem to change the password often. you may
    not find free wi-fi in an airline's lounge, overpriced coffee shops,
    etc. but free wi-fi is out there...and i'm not referring to unsecured
    residental systems.

    73,
    rich, n9dko
     
    Rich, Dec 27, 2006
    #18
  19. I have Verizon Broadband service (Now aval. in express card)
    It is allready in Los Angeles. I believe Verizon wireless spent billions
    (35) and it is up and running, National high-speed 3G Evolution-Data
    Optimized (EV-DO) network. Download complex files and view email attachments
    with average download speeds of 400-700 kbps capable of reaching up to 2.0
    Mbps

    http://b2b.vzw.com/broadband/serviceoverview.html


    Cellular broadband is going to go BIG!!!!!!!!!!!!

    For your info I live near LosAngeles California I own: A new ASUS
    Notebook, with Intel core 2 duo T7400, (2x2.16GHz) 4MB 667FSB processer.
    Memory -2GB (2 x 1GB) 667 MHz DDR2., ATI mobility Radon X1600 256MB Graphics
    card, 802.11a/b/g/n Pro wireless.

    I've used the service all over town, even going 60mph on the freeway I stay
    connected.

    IM HOOKED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



    "goobmeister" wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    >
    > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    >
    > Is this just semantics?
    >
    > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    >
    > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > with notebooka.
    >
    > THANK YOU!!!!!
    >
    > Goob
    > --
    > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?dGhlIGNvdW50?=, Jan 1, 2007
    #19
  20. Hello All,

    Special thanks to Jack Wireless Networking MVP and The Count.

    I FINALLY purchased my notebook after spending weeks comparing models: a
    64-bit Sony VAIO® VGN-C240E/B notebook with Vista Home Premium at MicroCenter
    in Costa Mesa/Irvine CA, and have pretty much the identical configuration as
    The Count.

    Before I take my notebook out of the box and start using it, what would be
    some helpful precautions, e. g., virus setup, setting up a Verizon Wireless
    broadband account with an express card, etc?? All advice is appreciated
    greatly!!

    Also, this notebook has integrated video and I would have had to cough up an
    extra $400 for a dedicated nVidia vid card. I'm hoping that my 2 gigs of RAM
    will help overcome any shared RAM sacrifices?

    Concerning the so-called "express card" I wish to purchase at Verizon: I
    was told a friend had sent her notebook back to DELL so they could install a
    "chip" in it to give her such broadband access. Is that different from a
    card that I purchase from a local Verizon dealer?

    THANKS in advance for any/all help all you out there can give me! I'm off
    on my journey!

    Goob
    --
    ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister


    "the count" wrote:

    > I have Verizon Broadband service (Now aval. in express card)
    > It is allready in Los Angeles. I believe Verizon wireless spent billions
    > (35) and it is up and running, National high-speed 3G Evolution-Data
    > Optimized (EV-DO) network. Download complex files and view email attachments
    > with average download speeds of 400-700 kbps capable of reaching up to 2.0
    > Mbps
    >
    > http://b2b.vzw.com/broadband/serviceoverview.html
    >
    >
    > Cellular broadband is going to go BIG!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    > For your info I live near LosAngeles California I own: A new ASUS
    > Notebook, with Intel core 2 duo T7400, (2x2.16GHz) 4MB 667FSB processer.
    > Memory -2GB (2 x 1GB) 667 MHz DDR2., ATI mobility Radon X1600 256MB Graphics
    > card, 802.11a/b/g/n Pro wireless.
    >
    > I've used the service all over town, even going 60mph on the freeway I stay
    > connected.
    >
    > IM HOOKED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    >
    >
    >
    > "goobmeister" wrote:
    >
    > > Hi,
    > >
    > > Before I get into this arena with the purchase of a new wireless-capable
    > > notebook, one very basic question: is wireless and wi-fi the same thing?
    > >
    > > I notice some notebook descriptives saying, "connect to wi-fi hotspots
    > > anywhere!" While ohers say, "connect wirelessly anywhere!" ?
    > >
    > > Is this just semantics?
    > >
    > > Thanks for the help!! And while I'm at it, why do folks subscribe to
    > > accounts such as T-Mobile Hot Spot? Can't a wireless notebook get on the Net
    > > in an unlimited way? If not, WHY not, please??
    > >
    > > These are very basic questions, I realize, but I might as well start at the
    > > beginning!!?? I've had decent experience with desktop wireless, but never
    > > with notebooka.
    > >
    > > THANK YOU!!!!!
    > >
    > > Goob
    > > --
    > > ALL ABOUT ME/goobmeister
     
    =?Utf-8?B?Z29vYm1laXN0ZXI=?=, Feb 2, 2007
    #20
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