winsock.dll

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by J, Jul 19, 2004.

  1. J

    J Guest

    I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply delete
    or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a protected
    system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file can
    become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
     
    J, Jul 19, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. J

    chris Guest

    Hi

    In a nut shell, the winsock helps translate the DNS names to IP address on
    your local computer. (I know it is far more complicated than that but...)

    If you can surf by IP but not names it may be winsock.

    Here is Microsofts recomendations for fixing this issue

    Chirs
    Method 1
    If you have only one computer or do not have access to a computer with the
    same operating system version and a similar hardware configuration,
    Microsoft recommends Method 1.

    WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft
    cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry
    Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    Use Registry Editor to export and delete the Winsock and Winsock2 registry
    subkeys, and then remove and reinstall TCP/IP on Windows 2000, or reinstall
    TCP/IP on Windows XP.
    Export and Delete the Corrupted Registry Subkeys
    1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer whose
    registry entries you are exporting.
    2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    4.. Locate and click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock

    5.. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy
    (A:), type a name for the file in the File name box, and then click Save.
    6.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted to
    confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    7.. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the following subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock2

    Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    8.. Right-click Winsock2, click Delete, and then click Yes.
    9.. Restart the computer.

    Note Restart the computer after you delete the Winsock and Winsock2
    registry subkeys.
    Remove TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click Local
    Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    3.. Under This component uses the following items, click Internet Protocol
    (TCP/IP), and then click Uninstall.
    4.. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove TCP/IP.
    5.. Restart the computer when prompted, but click No if you are prompted
    to allow Windows to enable a protocol.


    Install TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click Local
    Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    3.. Click Install.
    4.. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and
    then click Add.
    5.. Under Network Protocol, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then
    click OK.
    6.. When the protocol is installed, click Close.
    7.. Restart the computer.
    Reinstall TCP/IP on a Windows XP Computer
    In Windows XP, the TCP/IP stack is a core component of the operating system;
    therefore, you cannot remove TCP/IP in Windows XP.
    1.. Install TCP/IP on top of itself:
    1.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click
    Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    2.. Click Install.
    3.. Click Protocol, and then click Add.
    4.. Click Have Disk.
    5.. Type the path of the Nettcpip.inf file, and then click OK.
    Typically, the Nettcpip.inf file is in the C:\Windows\Inf folder.
    6.. In the list of available protocols, click Internet Protocol
    (TCP/IP), and then click OK.
    2.. Restart the computer.

    When the computer restarts, the Winsock and the Winsock2 subkeys will be
    functional.
    Method 2
    If you are correcting this problem on several computers and you have access
    to a working computer with the same operating system version and a similar
    hardware configuration, Microsoft recommends Method 2.

    WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Microsoft
    cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using Registry
    Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    To resolve this issue, delete the corrupted registry entries, and then
    replace them with the registry key information exported from a computer that
    has a working installation of TCP/IP. To do this, follow these steps.
    Delete the Corrupted Registry Entries
    1.. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
    2.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry
    subkey:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services.
    3.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted to
    confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    4.. Right-click Winsock2, and then click Delete. When you are prompted to
    confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    Export the Registry Entries to a Floppy Disk
    Note The computer that you are importing the registry entries from must use
    the same version of Windows and be either similar to or a duplicate of the
    computer that is experiencing the issues described in the "Symptoms"
    section.
    1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer whose
    registry entries you are exporting.
    2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    4.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry subkey:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services, and then click
    Winsock.
    5.. Click File, and then click Export.
    6.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file in
    the File name box, and then click Save.
    7.. Click Winsock2, click File, and then click Export.
    8.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file in
    the File name box, and then click Save.

    Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    9.. Quit Registry Editor.
    Import the Registry Entries from the Floppy Disk
    1.. Insert the floppy disk that contains the .reg files in the floppy disk
    drive of the computer that is experiencing the issue that is mentioned in
    the "Symptoms" section.
    2.. Start Windows Explorer, click My Computer, and then double-click 3½
    Floppy(A:).
    3.. Double-click each .reg file that you created and saved to the floppy
    disk in the "Export the Registry Keys to a Floppy Disk" section.
    4.. Click Yes when you are prompted to add information to the registry.
    5.. Click OK when you receive the message that the information is
    successfully entered in the registry


    "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    delete
    > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a protected
    > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file can
    > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    >
    >
     
    chris, Jul 19, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. J

    chris Guest

    P.S. This is a common fix for not being able to surf but able to obtain IP
    address and ability to ping and do other dos related network commands

    Chris


    "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    delete
    > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a protected
    > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file can
    > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    >
    >
     
    chris, Jul 19, 2004
    #3
  4. J

    AG Guest

    "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    delete
    > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a protected
    > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file can
    > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    >
    >

    There's a program that will do this for you called Winsock XP fix.
    It's available here:
    http://www.spychecker.com/program/winsockxpfix.html

    I've used it several times.

    AG
     
    AG, Jul 19, 2004
    #4
  5. J

    J Guest

    alright, thanks, that helps
    now, someone had told me that the winsock.dll file was used for DNS, but
    they said that it was only used for high level applications like internet
    explorer and it was not used for applications like ping. so, in IE, if you
    could go to http://66.102.7.147 which is an ip address for google, but could
    not go to http://www.google.com, then it could be the winsock.dll file, but
    in ping, if u could ping http://66.102.7.147 but not http://www.google.com
    then the problem was not the winsock.dll file. I am skeptical of this
    because I would think that resolving domain names to ip addresses is the
    same, no matter what program is using it.

    "chris" <> wrote in message
    news:nDPKc.56752$Mr4.48616@pd7tw1no...
    > Hi
    >
    > In a nut shell, the winsock helps translate the DNS names to IP address on
    > your local computer. (I know it is far more complicated than that but...)
    >
    > If you can surf by IP but not names it may be winsock.
    >
    > Here is Microsofts recomendations for fixing this issue
    >
    > Chirs
    > Method 1
    > If you have only one computer or do not have access to a computer with the
    > same operating system version and a similar hardware configuration,
    > Microsoft recommends Method 1.
    >
    > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    Microsoft
    > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    Registry
    > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > Use Registry Editor to export and delete the Winsock and Winsock2 registry
    > subkeys, and then remove and reinstall TCP/IP on Windows 2000, or

    reinstall
    > TCP/IP on Windows XP.
    > Export and Delete the Corrupted Registry Subkeys
    > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer whose
    > registry entries you are exporting.
    > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > 4.. Locate and click the following registry subkey:
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock
    >
    > 5.. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy
    > (A:), type a name for the file in the File name box, and then click Save.
    > 6.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted to
    > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > 7.. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the following subkey:
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock2
    >
    > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > 8.. Right-click Winsock2, click Delete, and then click Yes.
    > 9.. Restart the computer.
    >
    > Note Restart the computer after you delete the Winsock and Winsock2
    > registry subkeys.
    > Remove TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    Local
    > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > 3.. Under This component uses the following items, click Internet

    Protocol
    > (TCP/IP), and then click Uninstall.
    > 4.. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove TCP/IP.
    > 5.. Restart the computer when prompted, but click No if you are prompted
    > to allow Windows to enable a protocol.
    >
    >
    > Install TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    Local
    > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > 3.. Click Install.
    > 4.. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol, and
    > then click Add.
    > 5.. Under Network Protocol, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then
    > click OK.
    > 6.. When the protocol is installed, click Close.
    > 7.. Restart the computer.
    > Reinstall TCP/IP on a Windows XP Computer
    > In Windows XP, the TCP/IP stack is a core component of the operating

    system;
    > therefore, you cannot remove TCP/IP in Windows XP.
    > 1.. Install TCP/IP on top of itself:
    > 1.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click
    > Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > 2.. Click Install.
    > 3.. Click Protocol, and then click Add.
    > 4.. Click Have Disk.
    > 5.. Type the path of the Nettcpip.inf file, and then click OK.
    > Typically, the Nettcpip.inf file is in the C:\Windows\Inf folder.
    > 6.. In the list of available protocols, click Internet Protocol
    > (TCP/IP), and then click OK.
    > 2.. Restart the computer.
    >
    > When the computer restarts, the Winsock and the Winsock2 subkeys will be
    > functional.
    > Method 2
    > If you are correcting this problem on several computers and you have

    access
    > to a working computer with the same operating system version and a similar
    > hardware configuration, Microsoft recommends Method 2.
    >
    > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    Microsoft
    > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    Registry
    > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > To resolve this issue, delete the corrupted registry entries, and then
    > replace them with the registry key information exported from a computer

    that
    > has a working installation of TCP/IP. To do this, follow these steps.
    > Delete the Corrupted Registry Entries
    > 1.. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > 2.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry
    > subkey:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services.
    > 3.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted to
    > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > 4.. Right-click Winsock2, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    to
    > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > Export the Registry Entries to a Floppy Disk
    > Note The computer that you are importing the registry entries from must

    use
    > the same version of Windows and be either similar to or a duplicate of the
    > computer that is experiencing the issues described in the "Symptoms"
    > section.
    > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer whose
    > registry entries you are exporting.
    > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > 4.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry subkey:
    > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services, and then click
    > Winsock.
    > 5.. Click File, and then click Export.
    > 6.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file in
    > the File name box, and then click Save.
    > 7.. Click Winsock2, click File, and then click Export.
    > 8.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file in
    > the File name box, and then click Save.
    >
    > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > 9.. Quit Registry Editor.
    > Import the Registry Entries from the Floppy Disk
    > 1.. Insert the floppy disk that contains the .reg files in the floppy

    disk
    > drive of the computer that is experiencing the issue that is mentioned in
    > the "Symptoms" section.
    > 2.. Start Windows Explorer, click My Computer, and then double-click 3½
    > Floppy(A:).
    > 3.. Double-click each .reg file that you created and saved to the floppy
    > disk in the "Export the Registry Keys to a Floppy Disk" section.
    > 4.. Click Yes when you are prompted to add information to the registry.
    > 5.. Click OK when you receive the message that the information is
    > successfully entered in the registry
    >
    >
    > "J" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    > delete
    > > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a

    protected
    > > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file

    can
    > > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    > > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    J, Jul 19, 2004
    #5
  6. J

    chris Guest

    Hi

    I am not the best at this DNS stuff but one can use ping, tracert and the
    like from DOS, Linux or the new MAC )S (without windows). Winsock only comes
    in to play when Windows is loaded.

    Maybe some one out there has a better explanation of how this actually
    works.

    Chris

    "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > alright, thanks, that helps
    > now, someone had told me that the winsock.dll file was used for DNS, but
    > they said that it was only used for high level applications like internet
    > explorer and it was not used for applications like ping. so, in IE, if

    you
    > could go to http://66.102.7.147 which is an ip address for google, but

    could
    > not go to http://www.google.com, then it could be the winsock.dll file,

    but
    > in ping, if u could ping http://66.102.7.147 but not http://www.google.com
    > then the problem was not the winsock.dll file. I am skeptical of this
    > because I would think that resolving domain names to ip addresses is the
    > same, no matter what program is using it.
    >
    > "chris" <> wrote in message
    > news:nDPKc.56752$Mr4.48616@pd7tw1no...
    > > Hi
    > >
    > > In a nut shell, the winsock helps translate the DNS names to IP address

    on
    > > your local computer. (I know it is far more complicated than that

    but...)
    > >
    > > If you can surf by IP but not names it may be winsock.
    > >
    > > Here is Microsofts recomendations for fixing this issue
    > >
    > > Chirs
    > > Method 1
    > > If you have only one computer or do not have access to a computer with

    the
    > > same operating system version and a similar hardware configuration,
    > > Microsoft recommends Method 1.
    > >
    > > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    > Microsoft
    > > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    > Registry
    > > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > > Use Registry Editor to export and delete the Winsock and Winsock2

    registry
    > > subkeys, and then remove and reinstall TCP/IP on Windows 2000, or

    > reinstall
    > > TCP/IP on Windows XP.
    > > Export and Delete the Corrupted Registry Subkeys
    > > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer

    whose
    > > registry entries you are exporting.
    > > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 4.. Locate and click the following registry subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock
    > >
    > > 5.. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save in box, click 3½

    Floppy
    > > (A:), type a name for the file in the File name box, and then click

    Save.
    > > 6.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > 7.. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the following subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock2
    > >
    > > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > > 8.. Right-click Winsock2, click Delete, and then click Yes.
    > > 9.. Restart the computer.
    > >
    > > Note Restart the computer after you delete the Winsock and Winsock2
    > > registry subkeys.
    > > Remove TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    > Local
    > > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 3.. Under This component uses the following items, click Internet

    > Protocol
    > > (TCP/IP), and then click Uninstall.
    > > 4.. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove TCP/IP.
    > > 5.. Restart the computer when prompted, but click No if you are

    prompted
    > > to allow Windows to enable a protocol.
    > >
    > >
    > > Install TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    > Local
    > > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 3.. Click Install.
    > > 4.. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol,

    and
    > > then click Add.
    > > 5.. Under Network Protocol, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then
    > > click OK.
    > > 6.. When the protocol is installed, click Close.
    > > 7.. Restart the computer.
    > > Reinstall TCP/IP on a Windows XP Computer
    > > In Windows XP, the TCP/IP stack is a core component of the operating

    > system;
    > > therefore, you cannot remove TCP/IP in Windows XP.
    > > 1.. Install TCP/IP on top of itself:
    > > 1.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click
    > > Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 2.. Click Install.
    > > 3.. Click Protocol, and then click Add.
    > > 4.. Click Have Disk.
    > > 5.. Type the path of the Nettcpip.inf file, and then click OK.
    > > Typically, the Nettcpip.inf file is in the C:\Windows\Inf folder.
    > > 6.. In the list of available protocols, click Internet Protocol
    > > (TCP/IP), and then click OK.
    > > 2.. Restart the computer.
    > >
    > > When the computer restarts, the Winsock and the Winsock2 subkeys will

    be
    > > functional.
    > > Method 2
    > > If you are correcting this problem on several computers and you have

    > access
    > > to a working computer with the same operating system version and a

    similar
    > > hardware configuration, Microsoft recommends Method 2.
    > >
    > > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    > Microsoft
    > > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    > Registry
    > > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > > To resolve this issue, delete the corrupted registry entries, and then
    > > replace them with the registry key information exported from a computer

    > that
    > > has a working installation of TCP/IP. To do this, follow these steps.
    > > Delete the Corrupted Registry Entries
    > > 1.. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 2.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry
    > > subkey:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services.
    > > 3.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > 4.. Right-click Winsock2, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    > to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > Export the Registry Entries to a Floppy Disk
    > > Note The computer that you are importing the registry entries from must

    > use
    > > the same version of Windows and be either similar to or a duplicate of

    the
    > > computer that is experiencing the issues described in the "Symptoms"
    > > section.
    > > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer

    whose
    > > registry entries you are exporting.
    > > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 4.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry

    subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services, and then click
    > > Winsock.
    > > 5.. Click File, and then click Export.
    > > 6.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file

    in
    > > the File name box, and then click Save.
    > > 7.. Click Winsock2, click File, and then click Export.
    > > 8.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file

    in
    > > the File name box, and then click Save.
    > >
    > > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > > 9.. Quit Registry Editor.
    > > Import the Registry Entries from the Floppy Disk
    > > 1.. Insert the floppy disk that contains the .reg files in the floppy

    > disk
    > > drive of the computer that is experiencing the issue that is mentioned

    in
    > > the "Symptoms" section.
    > > 2.. Start Windows Explorer, click My Computer, and then double-click


    > > Floppy(A:).
    > > 3.. Double-click each .reg file that you created and saved to the

    floppy
    > > disk in the "Export the Registry Keys to a Floppy Disk" section.
    > > 4.. Click Yes when you are prompted to add information to the

    registry.
    > > 5.. Click OK when you receive the message that the information is
    > > successfully entered in the registry
    > >
    > >
    > > "J" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    > > delete
    > > > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a

    > protected
    > > > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file

    > can
    > > > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > > > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone

    ever
    > > > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    chris, Jul 19, 2004
    #6
  7. J

    AG Guest

    "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > alright, thanks, that helps
    > now, someone had told me that the winsock.dll file was used for DNS, but
    > they said that it was only used for high level applications like internet
    > explorer and it was not used for applications like ping. so, in IE, if

    you
    > could go to http://66.102.7.147 which is an ip address for google, but

    could
    > not go to http://www.google.com, then it could be the winsock.dll file,

    but
    > in ping, if u could ping http://66.102.7.147 but not http://www.google.com
    > then the problem was not the winsock.dll file. I am skeptical of this
    > because I would think that resolving domain names to ip addresses is the
    > same, no matter what program is using it.
    >
    > "chris" <> wrote in message
    > news:nDPKc.56752$Mr4.48616@pd7tw1no...


    If you can ping or connect to an IP address but not a web name then DNS
    isn't working. It's usually the Winsock service that isn't working but I
    have seen some firewalls cause the same problem. I haven't seen it lately
    so I'm guessing that they have that fixed.
    It shouldn't matter whether it's DOS or Windows IE if you can connect to an
    IP but not an address then your DNS isn't working which usually means
    Winsock.
    AG



    > > Hi
    > >
    > > In a nut shell, the winsock helps translate the DNS names to IP address

    on
    > > your local computer. (I know it is far more complicated than that

    but...)
    > >
    > > If you can surf by IP but not names it may be winsock.
    > >
    > > Here is Microsofts recomendations for fixing this issue
    > >
    > > Chirs
    > > Method 1
    > > If you have only one computer or do not have access to a computer with

    the
    > > same operating system version and a similar hardware configuration,
    > > Microsoft recommends Method 1.
    > >
    > > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    > Microsoft
    > > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    > Registry
    > > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > > Use Registry Editor to export and delete the Winsock and Winsock2

    registry
    > > subkeys, and then remove and reinstall TCP/IP on Windows 2000, or

    > reinstall
    > > TCP/IP on Windows XP.
    > > Export and Delete the Corrupted Registry Subkeys
    > > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer

    whose
    > > registry entries you are exporting.
    > > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 4.. Locate and click the following registry subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock
    > >
    > > 5.. On the File menu, click Export. In the Save in box, click 3½

    Floppy
    > > (A:), type a name for the file in the File name box, and then click

    Save.
    > > 6.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > 7.. Repeat steps 3 through 5 for the following subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Winsock2
    > >
    > > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > > 8.. Right-click Winsock2, click Delete, and then click Yes.
    > > 9.. Restart the computer.
    > >
    > > Note Restart the computer after you delete the Winsock and Winsock2
    > > registry subkeys.
    > > Remove TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    > Local
    > > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 3.. Under This component uses the following items, click Internet

    > Protocol
    > > (TCP/IP), and then click Uninstall.
    > > 4.. Follow the instructions on the screen to remove TCP/IP.
    > > 5.. Restart the computer when prompted, but click No if you are

    prompted
    > > to allow Windows to enable a protocol.
    > >
    > >
    > > Install TCP/IP on a Windows 2000-based Computer
    > > 1.. Log on to Windows as Administrator.
    > > 2.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click

    > Local
    > > Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 3.. Click Install.
    > > 4.. In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click Protocol,

    and
    > > then click Add.
    > > 5.. Under Network Protocol, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then
    > > click OK.
    > > 6.. When the protocol is installed, click Close.
    > > 7.. Restart the computer.
    > > Reinstall TCP/IP on a Windows XP Computer
    > > In Windows XP, the TCP/IP stack is a core component of the operating

    > system;
    > > therefore, you cannot remove TCP/IP in Windows XP.
    > > 1.. Install TCP/IP on top of itself:
    > > 1.. In Control Panel, double-click Network Connections, right-click
    > > Local Area Connection, and then click Properties.
    > > 2.. Click Install.
    > > 3.. Click Protocol, and then click Add.
    > > 4.. Click Have Disk.
    > > 5.. Type the path of the Nettcpip.inf file, and then click OK.
    > > Typically, the Nettcpip.inf file is in the C:\Windows\Inf folder.
    > > 6.. In the list of available protocols, click Internet Protocol
    > > (TCP/IP), and then click OK.
    > > 2.. Restart the computer.
    > >
    > > When the computer restarts, the Winsock and the Winsock2 subkeys will

    be
    > > functional.
    > > Method 2
    > > If you are correcting this problem on several computers and you have

    > access
    > > to a working computer with the same operating system version and a

    similar
    > > hardware configuration, Microsoft recommends Method 2.
    > >
    > > WARNING: If you use Registry Editor incorrectly, you may cause serious
    > > problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system.

    > Microsoft
    > > cannot guarantee that you can solve problems that result from using

    > Registry
    > > Editor incorrectly. Use Registry Editor at your own risk.
    > > To resolve this issue, delete the corrupted registry entries, and then
    > > replace them with the registry key information exported from a computer

    > that
    > > has a working installation of TCP/IP. To do this, follow these steps.
    > > Delete the Corrupted Registry Entries
    > > 1.. Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 2.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry
    > > subkey:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services.
    > > 3.. Right-click Winsock, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > 4.. Right-click Winsock2, and then click Delete. When you are prompted

    > to
    > > confirm the deletion, click Yes.
    > > Export the Registry Entries to a Floppy Disk
    > > Note The computer that you are importing the registry entries from must

    > use
    > > the same version of Windows and be either similar to or a duplicate of

    the
    > > computer that is experiencing the issues described in the "Symptoms"
    > > section.
    > > 1.. Insert a floppy disk in the floppy disk drive of the computer

    whose
    > > registry entries you are exporting.
    > > 2.. Click Start, and then click Run.
    > > 3.. In the Open box, type regedit, and then click OK.
    > > 4.. In Registry Editor, locate and click the following registry

    subkey:
    > > HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services, and then click
    > > Winsock.
    > > 5.. Click File, and then click Export.
    > > 6.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file

    in
    > > the File name box, and then click Save.
    > > 7.. Click Winsock2, click File, and then click Export.
    > > 8.. In the Save in box, click 3½ Floppy(A:), type a name for the file

    in
    > > the File name box, and then click Save.
    > >
    > > Note Each .reg file that you save must have a different name.
    > > 9.. Quit Registry Editor.
    > > Import the Registry Entries from the Floppy Disk
    > > 1.. Insert the floppy disk that contains the .reg files in the floppy

    > disk
    > > drive of the computer that is experiencing the issue that is mentioned

    in
    > > the "Symptoms" section.
    > > 2.. Start Windows Explorer, click My Computer, and then double-click


    > > Floppy(A:).
    > > 3.. Double-click each .reg file that you created and saved to the

    floppy
    > > disk in the "Export the Registry Keys to a Floppy Disk" section.
    > > 4.. Click Yes when you are prompted to add information to the

    registry.
    > > 5.. Click OK when you receive the message that the information is
    > > successfully entered in the registry
    > >
    > >
    > > "J" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    > > delete
    > > > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a

    > protected
    > > > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file

    > can
    > > > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > > > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone

    ever
    > > > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    AG, Jul 19, 2004
    #7
  8. "J" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I have heard that when u are having internet problems you can simply

    delete
    > or rename the winsock.dll file in windows XP and because it is a protected
    > system file, XP will make a new copy of winsock.dll, because the file can
    > become corrupted. what does the winsock.dll file do? (yeah, I
    > know....RTFM...) I guess what I really want to know is, has anyone ever
    > tried that before and has it ever solved your problem?


    I've experienced winsock problems before...usually as a result of removing
    some particularly nasty spyware. It would manifest as being unable to
    obtain an IP address from a DHCP server (something about a "socker error"),
    or being unable to open any webpages in Internet Explorer.

    To fix it, I used a program called LSPFix. I believe HijackThis can also
    repair this, as it can recognize a corrupt/damage winsock entry in the
    registry.
     
    Patrick Michael, Jul 20, 2004
    #8
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