Windows Vista X64 bsod

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by spock, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. spock

    spock Guest

    Hello All

    I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot up you get the
    dreaded BSOD which displays

    NMI: parity error / memory parity error

    Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or activated til now.
    I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have tried other memory,
    did not change and I run
    my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP X64 it is quit
    stable.

    My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and Adaptec 48300 and an ATI
    4550 video card
    and a leadtek tv tuner card.

    Lee
     
    spock, Nov 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. spock

    Carlos Guest

    Spock,
    The only way to be sure about your memory sticks is to run memtest86+
    Download version 4.00 from http://www.memtest.org/
    Run it from a bootable floppy or bootable pen drive.
    Vista and Win 7 seem to be more susceptible to minor memory glitches than
    Windows XP
    Carlos

    "spock" wrote:

    > Hello All
    >
    > I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot up you get the
    > dreaded BSOD which displays
    >
    > NMI: parity error / memory parity error
    >
    > Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or activated til now.
    > I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have tried other memory,
    > did not change and I run
    > my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP X64 it is quit
    > stable.
    >
    > My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and Adaptec 48300 and an ATI
    > 4550 video card
    > and a leadtek tv tuner card.
    >
    > Lee
    >
    >
    > .
    >
     
    Carlos, Nov 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. Not a sure way at all to test memory, but better than no test at all.

    A sure way to test memory is with a hardware memory tester such as shown on
    this page:
    http://simmtester.com/page/shop/shop.asp

    This is what the fellows who frequent the computer shows use before
    purchasing used memory from their customers.

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security


    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Spock,
    > The only way to be sure about your memory sticks is to run memtest86+
    > Download version 4.00 from http://www.memtest.org/
    > Run it from a bootable floppy or bootable pen drive.
    > Vista and Win 7 seem to be more susceptible to minor memory glitches than
    > Windows XP
    > Carlos
    >
    > "spock" wrote:
    >
    >> Hello All
    >>
    >> I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot
    >> up you get the
    >> dreaded BSOD which displays
    >>
    >> NMI: parity error / memory parity error
    >>
    >> Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or
    >> activated til now.
    >> I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have tried
    >> other memory,
    >> did not change and I run
    >> my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP
    >> X64 it is quit
    >> stable.
    >>
    >> My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and Adaptec
    >> 48300 and an ATI
    >> 4550 video card
    >> and a leadtek tv tuner card.
    >>
    >> Lee
    >>
    >>
    >> .
    >>
     
    Richard Urban, Nov 13, 2009
    #3
  4. spock

    Kue2 Guest

    Windows Vista has A memory diagnostic program at f-8 screen.
    This will test your memory.

    Very good tutorial go here:
    http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial146.html

    "spock" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello All
    >
    > I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot up
    > you get the
    > dreaded BSOD which displays
    >
    > NMI: parity error / memory parity error
    >
    > Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or
    > activated til now.
    > I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have tried
    > other memory, did not change and I run
    > my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP X64
    > it is quit stable.
    >
    > My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and Adaptec
    > 48300 and an ATI 4550 video card
    > and a leadtek tv tuner card.
    >
    > Lee
    >
     
    Kue2, Nov 13, 2009
    #4
  5. Memtest86 is next to useless.

    I am one who has purchased a hardware tester. I routinely ran Memtest86 and
    found good RAM. I then tested the RAM with the hardware tester and found out
    it actually WAS defective. After doing this for a year or so I became 100%
    convinced that the software testers are worthless. Yes, if the software test
    says it is bad it usually is. But in a large number of cases when the
    software test says it is good - it is still bad!

    I can't begin to tell you how many hours technicians waste on computers
    because the RAM tests good with a software test.

    Any decent repair shop will have a hardware tester. You are better off
    taking it to them, paying a few bucks and know the true status of the RAM.

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security


    "David B." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Yes, I'm sure the average PC user is going to run out and spend 1-2
    > thousand dollars on a memory tester. Memtest is more than adequate.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > --
    > "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Not a sure way at all to test memory, but better than no test at all.
    >>
    >> A sure way to test memory is with a hardware memory tester such as shown
    >> on this page:
    >> http://simmtester.com/page/shop/shop.asp
    >>
    >> This is what the fellows who frequent the computer shows use before
    >> purchasing used memory from their customers.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Richard Urban
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    >>
    >>
    >> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Spock,
    >>> The only way to be sure about your memory sticks is to run memtest86+
    >>> Download version 4.00 from http://www.memtest.org/
    >>> Run it from a bootable floppy or bootable pen drive.
    >>> Vista and Win 7 seem to be more susceptible to minor memory glitches
    >>> than
    >>> Windows XP
    >>> Carlos
    >>>
    >>> "spock" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hello All
    >>>>
    >>>> I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot
    >>>> up you get the
    >>>> dreaded BSOD which displays
    >>>>
    >>>> NMI: parity error / memory parity error
    >>>>
    >>>> Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or
    >>>> activated til now.
    >>>> I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have
    >>>> tried other memory,
    >>>> did not change and I run
    >>>> my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP
    >>>> X64 it is quit
    >>>> stable.
    >>>>
    >>>> My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and
    >>>> Adaptec 48300 and an ATI
    >>>> 4550 video card
    >>>> and a leadtek tv tuner card.
    >>>>
    >>>> Lee
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> .
    >>>>

    >>

    >
     
    Richard Urban, Nov 13, 2009
    #5
  6. spock

    spock Guest

    I have just installed sp1 and it looks like that may have fixed it, time will tell

    Thanks Folks



    "Kue2" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Windows Vista has A memory diagnostic program at f-8 screen.
    > This will test your memory.
    >
    > Very good tutorial go here:
    > http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/tutorial146.html
    >
    > "spock" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hello All
    >>
    >> I had decided to install Vista X64 every so often when you try and boot up you get the
    >> dreaded BSOD which displays
    >>
    >> NMI: parity error / memory parity error
    >>
    >> Why did Install Vista ? Because I have it and it was not being used or activated til
    >> now.
    >> I find this puzzling as the memory is 4gb nonparity DDR3 and I have tried other memory,
    >> did not change and I run
    >> my machine dual boot with XP X64 and I have no known problems under XP X64 it is quit
    >> stable.
    >>
    >> My hardware Supermicro C2SBX X38 chipset and Q6700 cpu and Adaptec 48300 and an
    >> ATI 4550 video card
    >> and a leadtek tv tuner card.
    >>
    >> Lee
    >>
     
    spock, Nov 13, 2009
    #6
  7. The hardware tester stress tests the RAM at a higher operating voltage and a
    lower operating voltage - something that can not be done while the RAM is in
    the computer.

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security


    "John Whitworth" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Memtest86 is next to useless.

    >
    > Memtest86 has been able to confirm my suspicions about dodgy RAM on each
    > occasion that I've been unlucky enough to acquire it. That's good enough
    > for me. It may not be super accurate, but it is a good start, and it will
    > probably help 80% of those looking to isolate issues. Your post is just
    > trying to get people out of the self-fix habit. Sure, if they don't find a
    > fault after Memtest86, take it to a 'pro'. But if it enables them to prove
    > there is a problem without incurring costs, why should you deter them?
    >
    > Not only that, but could I guarantee that my PC is running with the same
    > speed and voltage settings as the hardware tester? I can with Memtest86.
    >
    > JW
     
    Richard Urban, Nov 17, 2009
    #7
  8. spock

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Richard.

    As I've reported before - and you may have seen - sometimes RAM that passes
    all the tests can still fail.

    When I built my computer at the end of 2006, I put in 2 x 1 GB OCZ PC-6400
    DIMMs. That ran Vista Ultimate x64 just fine for a year. Then I added 2
    more identical sticks and it ran with 4 GB for about 6 months. Then, last
    year, the computer started producing BSODs. Since the Stop codes varied
    randomly, I knew the problem was in hardware, not software, and I suspected
    memory problems. The RAM passed all my tests and those run by my local
    computer shop, but we got flaky results with one of the newer sticks was
    installed. I ran with 3 GB for a few months, then I contacted OCZ and the
    tech had me return BOTH new sticks so that they could test them as a matched
    pair. OCZ RMAed both sticks - and I've had no problem in the several months
    since then.

    So, even when RAM passes all the field tests, there might still be a problem
    that only the manufacturer can fix.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8089.0726) in Win7 Ultimate x64

    "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The hardware tester stress tests the RAM at a higher operating voltage and
    > a lower operating voltage - something that can not be done while the RAM
    > is in the computer.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Richard Urban
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    >
    >
    > "John Whitworth" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >>
    >> "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Memtest86 is next to useless.

    >>
    >> Memtest86 has been able to confirm my suspicions about dodgy RAM on each
    >> occasion that I've been unlucky enough to acquire it. That's good enough
    >> for me. It may not be super accurate, but it is a good start, and it will
    >> probably help 80% of those looking to isolate issues. Your post is just
    >> trying to get people out of the self-fix habit. Sure, if they don't find
    >> a fault after Memtest86, take it to a 'pro'. But if it enables them to
    >> prove there is a problem without incurring costs, why should you deter
    >> them?
    >>
    >> Not only that, but could I guarantee that my PC is running with the same
    >> speed and voltage settings as the hardware tester? I can with Memtest86.
    >>
    >> JW
     
    R. C. White, Nov 17, 2009
    #8
  9. How about "normal" voltage variations from the computers power supply.

    I have seen few darn computers with an honest 12 volts, 5 volts and 3.3
    volts. Many supplies are +- 10% of the stated voltage. Marginal RAM may
    begin faulting under those conditions. If you are lucky the voltage will be
    low/high when you run the software memory test programs and you will pick up
    on the condition.

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security


    "John Whitworth" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> The hardware tester stress tests the RAM at a higher operating voltage
    >> and a lower operating voltage - something that can not be done while the
    >> RAM is in the computer.

    >
    > Surely by testing it at different voltages, it is going to have different
    > results to when it is in the computer. So Memtest86 doesn't stand a chance
    > of picking that up - and why would it? Memtest86 is simply trying to see
    > if there is a problem - in that computer - with the current settings.
    >
    > The hardware stress tester sounds great to me if you want to make sure
    > that memory is going to survive extreme temperatures or overclocking etc.
    >
    > But whichever way you look at it, Memtest86 is an ideal first check,
    > screening out a lot of simple-to-find problems.
    >
    > JW
     
    Richard Urban, Nov 18, 2009
    #9
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