Windows and the effect of disappearing shared folders.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Bryan Souster, Dec 28, 2003.

  1. Greetings all,

    My Xmas project was to establish a home network for my two home computers
    (running XP Home and ME) and this turned out to be easy thanks to
    contributors to a thread in this ng some months ago. However it has given
    rise to a question on the reliability and resilience of my backup strategy.

    The situation is that I run Powerquest Datakeeper as a backup process on
    both machines - which for simplicity I will call A and B. Datakeeper allows
    files to be identified for backup along with a primary and secondary backup
    medium. I have now set the primary backup destination on each machine to
    use a shared folder on the other machine - i.e. on A the primary backup is
    to a share that resides on B. The secondary backup to a local folder.
    Datakeeper runs continuously (shows an icon in the system area) and files
    are backed up when closed (AFAIK).

    I have done my best to test what happens when one machine is powered up
    without the other, and when the connection is severed. In both cases the DK
    software reports that it is using or reverting to the secondary destination,
    however when the other machine is subsequently powered up or the connection
    is restored DK continues to use the secondary destination until it is
    restarted. This is of no concern as when restarted after using the
    secondary destination and finding the primary destination available it moves
    any backups done from the secondary destination to the primary destination.

    It would seem to me that I have achieved the goal to backup key files
    primarily to an external storage medium and secondarily to a local medium if
    access to the remote medium is lost.

    On both machines I have multiple disk partitions, one of which is dedicated
    to backups. On each partition there is a folder that is declared as shared
    and a folder used locally.

    This seems to good to be true. The only vulnerability I can spot is the
    usual one (disk media failure). Is there any other vulnerability that I
    have not spotted?

    --
    Bryan Souster
    For acronyms (IIRC, TIA etc) visit www.acronymfinder.com for the meanings.
     
    Bryan Souster, Dec 28, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bryan Souster

    Malcolm Guest

    Bryan Souster wrote:
    > Greetings all,
    >
    > My Xmas project was to establish a home network for my two home computers

    <snip>
    > This seems to good to be true. The only vulnerability I can spot is the
    > usual one (disk media failure). Is there any other vulnerability that I
    > have not spotted?

    Hi Bryan
    A potential vulnerability is if those shared folders are being exposed
    to to the internet....??
    Suggest you may wish to visit somewhere like http://www.grc.com or get
    someone externally to do a port scan when you are online, will also be a
    good check that your firewall is working.... :)

    Cheers
    Malcolm
     
    Malcolm, Dec 28, 2003
    #2
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  3. Bryan Souster

    -[Myth]- Guest

    On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:37:23 +1300, Bryan Souster wrote:

    > Greetings all,
    >
    > My Xmas project was to establish a home network for my two home computers
    > (running XP Home and ME) and this turned out to be easy thanks to
    > contributors to a thread in this ng some months ago. However it has given
    > rise to a question on the reliability and resilience of my backup strategy.
    >
    > The situation is that I run Powerquest Datakeeper as a backup process on
    > both machines - which for simplicity I will call A and B. Datakeeper allows
    > files to be identified for backup along with a primary and secondary backup
    > medium. I have now set the primary backup destination on each machine to
    > use a shared folder on the other machine - i.e. on A the primary backup is
    > to a share that resides on B. The secondary backup to a local folder.
    > Datakeeper runs continuously (shows an icon in the system area) and files
    > are backed up when closed (AFAIK).
    >
    > I have done my best to test what happens when one machine is powered up
    > without the other, and when the connection is severed. In both cases the DK
    > software reports that it is using or reverting to the secondary destination,
    > however when the other machine is subsequently powered up or the connection
    > is restored DK continues to use the secondary destination until it is
    > restarted. This is of no concern as when restarted after using the
    > secondary destination and finding the primary destination available it moves
    > any backups done from the secondary destination to the primary destination.
    >
    > It would seem to me that I have achieved the goal to backup key files
    > primarily to an external storage medium and secondarily to a local medium if
    > access to the remote medium is lost.
    >
    > On both machines I have multiple disk partitions, one of which is dedicated
    > to backups. On each partition there is a folder that is declared as shared
    > and a folder used locally.
    >
    > This seems to good to be true. The only vulnerability I can spot is the
    > usual one (disk media failure). Is there any other vulnerability that I
    > have not spotted?


    All I can say is, you must have some very important files if you go to all
    that trouble :)
     
    -[Myth]-, Dec 29, 2003
    #3
  4. -[Myth]- wrote:
    > On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 21:37:23 +1300, Bryan Souster wrote:
    >
    >> Greetings all,
    >>
    >> My Xmas project was to establish a home network for my two home
    >> computers (running XP Home and ME) and this turned out to be easy
    >> thanks to contributors to a thread in this ng some months ago.
    >> However it has given rise to a question on the reliability and
    >> resilience of my backup strategy.

    [snip]
    >
    > All I can say is, you must have some very important files if you go
    > to all that trouble :)


    All files lost become important when you discover you need them back 8-|

    It is one of the least troublesome backup scenarios to implement - when you
    know how to use shares. The whole setup took less than an hour...

    Bryan
     
    Bryan Souster, Dec 29, 2003
    #4
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