Windows 7 versions puzzle

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by ragmaniac, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. ragmaniac

    ragmaniac Guest

    At this time I am running both Windows Vista Home Premium (32 bit) and
    the Release Candidate Build 7100 (32 bit) of Windows 7 in dual boot
    mode.

    My machine is always a work in progress: sometimes with a new drive,
    or even a new MB. If I buy the Windows 7 (64 bit) ANYTIME UPGRADE,
    will it work for me?

    I need to re-install my Operating System on various occasions whenever
    I make a major overhaul of my system, but at NO TIME do I install the
    Operating system on MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER. I just need to re-install
    it when I make a major change, using the same legal access key.

    What do I need to buy to satisfy all MS licensing reuirements without
    feeling cheated over having paid for something I do not use?
    ragmaniac, Jan 5, 2010
    #1
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  2. The ANYTIME UPGRADE is applicable when you already have a version of Win
    7 installed, such as an upgrade from Home Premium to Professional or
    from Professional to Ultimate.

    You will need to purchase a regular UPGRADE that comes with 2 DVDs, one
    for x64 and one for x86.


    On 2010-01-05 08:32, ragmaniac wrote:
    > At this time I am running both Windows Vista Home Premium (32 bit) and
    > the Release Candidate Build 7100 (32 bit) of Windows 7 in dual boot
    > mode.
    >
    > My machine is always a work in progress: sometimes with a new drive,
    > or even a new MB. If I buy the Windows 7 (64 bit) ANYTIME UPGRADE,
    > will it work for me?
    >
    > I need to re-install my Operating System on various occasions whenever
    > I make a major overhaul of my system, but at NO TIME do I install the
    > Operating system on MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER. I just need to re-install
    > it when I make a major change, using the same legal access key.
    >
    > What do I need to buy to satisfy all MS licensing reuirements without
    > feeling cheated over having paid for something I do not use?
    Bobby Johnson, Jan 5, 2010
    #2
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  3. If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    reuse the OS you upgraded from.

    Otherwise, you should buy a full copy of Windows 7.

    You can buy an OEM copy of Windows 7 and would not have any difficulty
    transferring it to an upgraded system. This might not comply with the
    terms of the OEM licence and would only give you either the 32-bit or
    64-bit installation disk, not both as with the retail version.



    On 05/01/2010 13:32, ragmaniac wrote:
    > At this time I am running both Windows Vista Home Premium (32 bit) and
    > the Release Candidate Build 7100 (32 bit) of Windows 7 in dual boot
    > mode.
    >
    > My machine is always a work in progress: sometimes with a new drive,
    > or even a new MB. If I buy the Windows 7 (64 bit) ANYTIME UPGRADE,
    > will it work for me?
    >
    > I need to re-install my Operating System on various occasions whenever
    > I make a major overhaul of my system, but at NO TIME do I install the
    > Operating system on MORE THAN ONE COMPUTER. I just need to re-install
    > it when I make a major change, using the same legal access key.
    >
    > What do I need to buy to satisfy all MS licensing reuirements without
    > feeling cheated over having paid for something I do not use?
    Dominic Payer, Jan 5, 2010
    #3
  4. ragmaniac

    Tom Orle Guest

    Dominic Payer <> wrote:

    >If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    >- of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    >a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    >you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >reuse the OS you upgraded from.


    Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

    If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    installs.

    -=tom=-
    Tom Orle, Jan 5, 2010
    #4
  5. It's part of the Microsoft Windows Licensing Agreement. When you opt
    for an upgrade it is intended to "replace" the existing installation.
    So, if you opt to dual boot with your current OS you are violating the
    Microsoft Licensing Agreement. This provision is legitimate even if you
    don't read it!


    On 2010-01-05 16:04, Tom Orle wrote:
    > Dominic Payer<> wrote:
    >
    >> If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    >> - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    >> a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    >> you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >> reuse the OS you upgraded from.

    >
    > Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    > system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    > the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
    >
    > If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    > installs.
    >
    > -=tom=-
    >
    Bobby Johnson, Jan 5, 2010
    #5
  6. ragmaniac

    Tom Orle Guest

    Bobby Johnson <> wrote:

    I was under the impression that you can't reinstall the original XP on
    another box. Because then both OS's could be used simultaneously by
    different people.
    However, if both OS's are on the same dual boot system, then only one
    OS can be used at any given time.
    As I said earlier, if that is against MS's agreements, then logically
    any upgrade would not allow a dual boot to be built but physically
    replace the original or at least invalidate the registration.

    -=tom=-

    >It's part of the Microsoft Windows Licensing Agreement. When you opt
    >for an upgrade it is intended to "replace" the existing installation.
    >So, if you opt to dual boot with your current OS you are violating the
    >Microsoft Licensing Agreement. This provision is legitimate even if you
    >don't read it!
    >
    >
    >On 2010-01-05 16:04, Tom Orle wrote:
    >> Dominic Payer<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    >>> - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    >>> a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    >>> you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >>> reuse the OS you upgraded from.

    >>
    >> Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    >> system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    >> the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
    >>
    >> If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    >> installs.
    >>
    >> -=tom=-
    >>
    Tom Orle, Jan 5, 2010
    #6
  7. Don't complain to me, talk to Microsoft.

    On 2010-01-05 17:00, Tom Orle wrote:
    > Bobby Johnson<> wrote:
    >
    > I was under the impression that you can't reinstall the original XP on
    > another box. Because then both OS's could be used simultaneously by
    > different people.
    > However, if both OS's are on the same dual boot system, then only one
    > OS can be used at any given time.
    > As I said earlier, if that is against MS's agreements, then logically
    > any upgrade would not allow a dual boot to be built but physically
    > replace the original or at least invalidate the registration.
    >
    > -=tom=-
    >
    >> It's part of the Microsoft Windows Licensing Agreement. When you opt
    >> for an upgrade it is intended to "replace" the existing installation.
    >> So, if you opt to dual boot with your current OS you are violating the
    >> Microsoft Licensing Agreement. This provision is legitimate even if you
    >> don't read it!
    >>
    >>
    >> On 2010-01-05 16:04, Tom Orle wrote:
    >>> Dominic Payer<> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    >>>> - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    >>>> a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    >>>> you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >>>> reuse the OS you upgraded from.
    >>>
    >>> Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    >>> system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    >>> the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
    >>>
    >>> If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    >>> installs.
    >>>
    >>> -=tom=-
    >>>

    >
    Bobby Johnson, Jan 5, 2010
    #7
  8. The upgrade licence clearly says that it replaces the upgraded product
    licence. Consequently, the subsequent use of the upgraded product is
    legally invalid.

    Microsoft does not keep a register of the upgraded product licences so
    is unable to refuse activation if an upgraded product is reinstalled.



    On 05/01/2010 22:00, Tom Orle wrote:
    > Bobby Johnson<> wrote:
    >
    > I was under the impression that you can't reinstall the original XP on
    > another box. Because then both OS's could be used simultaneously by
    > different people.
    > However, if both OS's are on the same dual boot system, then only one
    > OS can be used at any given time.
    > As I said earlier, if that is against MS's agreements, then logically
    > any upgrade would not allow a dual boot to be built but physically
    > replace the original or at least invalidate the registration.
    >
    > -=tom=-
    >
    >> It's part of the Microsoft Windows Licensing Agreement. When you opt
    >> for an upgrade it is intended to "replace" the existing installation.
    >> So, if you opt to dual boot with your current OS you are violating the
    >> Microsoft Licensing Agreement. This provision is legitimate even if you
    >> don't read it!
    >>
    >>
    >> On 2010-01-05 16:04, Tom Orle wrote:
    >>> Dominic Payer<> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or retail
    >>>> - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can buy
    >>>> a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This gives
    >>>> you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >>>> reuse the OS you upgraded from.
    >>>
    >>> Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    >>> system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    >>> the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
    >>>
    >>> If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    >>> installs.
    >>>
    >>> -=tom=-
    >>>

    >
    Dominic Payer, Jan 5, 2010
    #8
  9. ragmaniac

    senn Guest

    "Dominic Payer" <> skrev i meddelelsen
    news:...
    > The upgrade licence clearly says that it replaces the upgraded product
    > licence. Consequently, the subsequent use of the upgraded product is
    > legally invalid.
    >
    > Microsoft does not keep a register of the upgraded product licences so is
    > unable to refuse activation if an upgraded product is reinstalled.
    >
    >

    I think you're wrong here. I've been through a phone call with MS
    about two years ago. I made an upgrade from XP to Vista. The
    ms-employee told me two times that I was allowed to continue use
    of my XP. Two times, because I thought he was wrong and told him this.
    Perhaps the above phrase "replaces the upgraded product" should
    be taken litterally. -If you have XP installed and replaces it by Vista.
    Unless this ms-employee could be wrong.

    Why buy an upgrade for an retail when the price difference is only
    a minuteman. The small difference in price could be used to explain
    the common sense why not blocking for continuous use of the os
    from which upgrading from.
    /senn


    >
    > On 05/01/2010 22:00, Tom Orle wrote:
    >> Bobby Johnson<> wrote:
    >>
    >> I was under the impression that you can't reinstall the original XP on
    >> another box. Because then both OS's could be used simultaneously by
    >> different people.
    >> However, if both OS's are on the same dual boot system, then only one
    >> OS can be used at any given time.
    >> As I said earlier, if that is against MS's agreements, then logically
    >> any upgrade would not allow a dual boot to be built but physically
    >> replace the original or at least invalidate the registration.
    >>
    >> -=tom=-
    >>
    >>> It's part of the Microsoft Windows Licensing Agreement. When you opt
    >>> for an upgrade it is intended to "replace" the existing installation.
    >>> So, if you opt to dual boot with your current OS you are violating the
    >>> Microsoft Licensing Agreement. This provision is legitimate even if you
    >>> don't read it!
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> On 2010-01-05 16:04, Tom Orle wrote:
    >>>> Dominic Payer<> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> If you intend to stop using Vista, or have another copy - OEM or
    >>>>> retail
    >>>>> - of any version of XP or Vista which has not been upgraded, you can
    >>>>> buy
    >>>>> a retail upgrade upgrade version of any edition of Windows 7. This
    >>>>> gives
    >>>>> you a transferable retail licence of Windows 7 but means you may not
    >>>>> reuse the OS you upgraded from.
    >>>>
    >>>> Are you saying that if you use a W7 upgrade to build a dual-boot
    >>>> system using an original XP, then you are not allowed to use XP after
    >>>> the upgrade? That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
    >>>>
    >>>> If that was the intent of MS, then upgrades should not allow dual boot
    >>>> installs.
    >>>>
    >>>> -=tom=-
    >>>>

    >>
    senn, Jan 6, 2010
    #9
  10. ragmaniac

    Jim Guest

    I have an OEM version of Windows 7 64-bit *only* with the "anytime
    upgrade" feature as part of it. My understanding is that *all*
    versions of Windows 7 ship with the full Ultimate on the DVD, but you
    have to pay for a new license number to use them. However, you cannot
    switch between 32-bit and 64-bit if you only have one DVD, as I do.
    Mine is 64-bit only.

    Jim
    Jim, Jan 7, 2010
    #10
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