Windows 7 question..

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Max Burke, Dec 26, 2009.

  1. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    (from XP pro 32bit)

    I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    for Windows 7.
    The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    over a year ago.

    The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    version?
    Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    install DVD.

    Anyone got any advice on that?

    BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.

    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 26, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Max Burke

    Carnations Guest

    On Sat, 26 Dec 2009 18:46:25 +1300, Max Burke wrote:

    > I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    > for Windows 7.

    <snip>

    > The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    > version?

    <snip>

    > Anyone got any advice on that?


    If you will be using the 2 drivers that you just updated, and if those drivers are 32bit binaries then you'll
    probably want to use a 32bit version of the OS.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Carnations, Dec 26, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Max Burke

    SteveM Guest

    Max Burke <> wrote in
    news:hh47vg$4ji$-september.org:

    > I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    > (from XP pro 32bit)
    >
    > I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    > for Windows 7.
    > The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    > over a year ago.
    >
    > The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    > version?
    > Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    > install DVD.
    >
    > Anyone got any advice on that?
    >
    > BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    > which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    > licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    > that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >


    Where did you get the family pack from?
    SteveM, Dec 26, 2009
    #3
  4. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    On 26/12/2009 8:33 p.m., SteveM wrote:
    > Max Burke<> wrote in
    > news:hh47vg$4ji$-september.org:
    >
    >> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>
    >> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    >> for Windows 7.
    >> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    >> over a year ago.
    >>
    >> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >> version?
    >> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >> install DVD.
    >>
    >> Anyone got any advice on that?
    >>
    >> BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    >> which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    >> licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    >> that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >>

    >
    > Where did you get the family pack from?


    http://www.pbtech.co.nz/index.php?item=OSYMST3582

    Also available through their bricks and mortar locations.
    I dont know when the 'limited time' runs out but I seam to remember it's
    the end of January.

    Or try here, it's cheaper. (I should have 'shopped around')
    http://www.dse.co.nz/dse.shop/4b35c7550066784c2740c0a87f3b06c0/Product/View/XS8100

    Maybe PBtech and DSE are bringing them in from Australia...

    Dont try here though:
    http://www.ascent.co.nz/productspecification.aspx?ItemID=382322

    They're selling the 3 pack upgrades at over twice the price! $600+
    Knowing Ascent it's likely to be a pricing mistake on their part.

    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 26, 2009
    #4
  5. Max Burke

    Dave Doe Guest

    In article <hh47vg$4ji$-september.org>,
    says...
    >
    > I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    > (from XP pro 32bit)
    >
    > I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    > for Windows 7.
    > The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    > over a year ago.
    >
    > The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    > version?
    > Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    > install DVD.
    >
    > Anyone got any advice on that?


    Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    don't let the ads get in the way.

    --
    Duncan.
    Dave Doe, Dec 26, 2009
    #5
  6. Max Burke

    peterwn Guest

    On Dec 26, 6:46 pm, Max Burke <> wrote:

    >
    > BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    > which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    > licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    > that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >

    Typical kick Kiwis in the guts by multinationaql corporations. This
    has been happening for decades - last to see new movies, etc, etc.
    Kipling had it right - 'last, lonliest, loveliest'.

    Presumably M$ thinks that Kiwis are less likely to 'pirate' Windows 7
    so sees no need to offer a cheap rate to Kiwis to encourage them to
    buy legit copies. Eat your heart out 'Impossible'.
    peterwn, Dec 26, 2009
    #6
  7. Max Burke

    Squiggle Guest

    Dave Doe threw some characters down the intarwebs:
    > In article <hh47vg$4ji$-september.org>,
    > says...
    >
    >> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>
    >> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    >> for Windows 7.
    >> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    >> over a year ago.
    >>
    >> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >> version?
    >> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >> install DVD.
    >>
    >> Anyone got any advice on that?
    >>

    >
    > Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    > install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    > 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    > slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    > the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    > don't let the ads get in the way.
    >
    >

    IIRC you can't upgrade from XP, only from Vista, so either way its a
    fresh install.
    Squiggle, Dec 26, 2009
    #7
  8. Max Burke

    Mary Hanna Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 10:19:35 +1300, Squiggle <> wrote:

    >Dave Doe threw some characters down the intarwebs:
    >> In article <hh47vg$4ji$-september.org>,
    >> says...
    >>
    >>> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >>> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>>
    >>> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    >>> for Windows 7.
    >>> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    >>> over a year ago.
    >>>
    >>> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >>> version?
    >>> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >>> install DVD.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone got any advice on that?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    >> install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    >> 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    >> slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    >> the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    >> don't let the ads get in the way.
    >>
    >>

    >IIRC you can't upgrade from XP, only from Vista, so either way its a
    >fresh install.



    Far better to Install WIN 7 as a Dual boot like I have done, so that I can
    run XP software that does not run on WIN 7..

    Just install WIN7 on a separate partition..
    Mary Hanna, Dec 26, 2009
    #8
  9. In article <4b367de8$>, says...
    > >

    > IIRC you can't upgrade from XP, only from Vista, so either way its a
    > fresh install.


    That's what I seem to recall reading on the MS website when I was
    checking for Win7 versions' abilities and differences. ( vista ==
    upgradable but not recommended, xp == fresh install)

    -P.
    Peter Huebner, Dec 26, 2009
    #9
  10. Max Burke

    Carnations Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 02:16:00 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:

    > Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    > install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    > 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    > slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    > the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    > don't let the ads get in the way.


    Wow!

    so I should take my native 64bit desktop PC (Linux) that I've been using for at least the last 4 years and
    trash it in favour of a 32bit version because 32bit versions of an OS run faster on 64bit hardware than
    64bit versions of the same OS.

    I fail to understand your logic.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Carnations, Dec 26, 2009
    #10
  11. Max Burke

    Biggles Guest

    On Sat, 26 Dec 2009 23:34:22 +0000, Carnations wrote:

    > On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 02:16:00 +1300, Dave Doe wrote:
    >
    >> Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    >> install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    >> 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    >> slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    >> the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    >> don't let the ads get in the way.

    >
    > Wow!
    >
    > so I should take my native 64bit desktop PC (Linux) that I've been using
    > for at least the last 4 years and trash it in favour of a 32bit version
    > because 32bit versions of an OS run faster on 64bit hardware than 64bit
    > versions of the same OS.
    >
    > I fail to understand your logic.


    Most people think your an idiot but I will try to indulge you ..


    http://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-482731-highlight-64bit slower.html

    That's some 3 years worth of posts from people having problems with the
    amd64 (linux) that you claim that's just worked for you for 4 years.
    There are also tons of other posts from gentoo guru's that have found
    massive problems / no benefits and have gone back to the 32 bit arch.
    The crappy disk I/O problem in the 64 bit arch existed for nearly 2 years.

    Search any other hundred's of linux forums over the last 4 years
    regarding slow performance during intensive I/O with 64bit its a FACT !

    Also try learning how to use google .. it will clearly show that dave is
    correct about the 64bit os performance / benchmarks versus 32 bit.

    So stop playing with your little boner and get better informed Lennier.

    As for Max's question ... Id suggest making sure WHQL drivers exist for
    all his hardware and I'm also quite happy with the 64bit version of 7.
    Performance roxxxx with my quad core!


    Bigglezz
    Biggles, Dec 27, 2009
    #11
  12. Max Burke

    Carnations Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 01:11:33 +0000, Biggles wrote:

    > As for Max's question ... Id suggest making sure WHQL drivers exist for
    > all his hardware and I'm also quite happy with the 64bit version of 7.


    So what you're saying is in fact that 64bit vs 32bit is quite satisfactory and there is no advantage to
    staying on 32bit.


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Carnations, Dec 27, 2009
    #12
  13. Max Burke

    Carnations Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 01:11:33 +0000, Biggles wrote:

    > Search any other hundred's of linux forums over the last 4 years
    > regarding slow performance during intensive I/O with 64bit its a FACT !


    What you're saying is that in the past there has been slow disc IO performance. with 64bit OSes.

    What about other performance?


    --
    "Filtering the Internet is like trying to boil the ocean"
    Carnations, Dec 27, 2009
    #13
  14. Max Burke

    PeeCee Guest

    "Max Burke" <> wrote in message
    news:hh47vg$4ji$-september.org...
    > I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium. (from
    > XP pro 32bit)
    >
    > I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed for
    > Windows 7.
    > The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    > over a year ago.
    >
    > The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    > version?
    > Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    > install DVD.
    >
    > Anyone got any advice on that?
    >
    > BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    > which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    > licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me that
    > the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > Found Images
    > http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke


    Max

    As others have indicated an 'upgrade' path is only available from Vista not
    XP.
    So you'll be doing a 'clean' Win7 install, make sure your backups are good.
    I notice you also mention "computers" (plural), how old are they?

    I've done several XP to Win7 changeovers since Win7 came out and offer the
    following thoughts to ponder on.

    1 Look hard at your hardware.
    A dual core CPU and 2+GB of RAM is the minimum realistic spec you need.
    If your old PC was not quick under XP, it's going to struggle under Win7.

    2 Download Win7 compatible drivers for your hardware and copy to CD/USB
    stick "before" you start.
    Older peripherals are the biggest victim of the change to Win7, same as when
    mainstream went from Win98 to XP.

    3 The 32/64 bit choice depends very much on how forward looking you are and
    whether you're recycling your hardware.
    If you carrying your hardware forward it will make sense to stay with 32 bit
    as you are more likely to get drivers in 32 bit.
    The Motherboard RAM limit may also influence your choice, there is not much
    sense going 64bit if your motherboard maxes out at 4GB.

    However going to 64 bit brings relief from this 4GB RAM limit of 32 bit.
    Be it for Security or Compability reasons one of the technologies that is
    becoming more prevalent is Virual PC's.
    With 32 bit Windows practical RAM limit of 3GB you can only realistically
    run 1 or 2 Virtual PC's with 512MB of Virtual RAM and leave enough to run
    native apps.
    64 bit Windows on the other hand is only limited by motherboard maximums and
    can run as many as you can squeeze in.

    If you buy the Business or Ultimate versions of Windows 7 you can download
    for free Microsoft's XP Mode Virtual PC.
    I've used it for a couple of my customers to run older software that is
    critical to their business's and it works a treat.
    On a i5/i7 or Phenom CPU, Virtual XP mode and Win7 64bit gives you the best
    of both worlds.

    Best
    Paul.
    PeeCee, Dec 27, 2009
    #14
  15. Max Burke

    Mary Hanna Guest

    On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 16:21:20 +1300, "PeeCee" <> wrote:

    >
    >
    >"Max Burke" <> wrote in message
    >news:hh47vg$4ji$-september.org...
    >> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium. (from
    >> XP pro 32bit)
    >>
    >> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed for
    >> Windows 7.
    >> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    >> over a year ago.
    >>
    >> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >> version?
    >> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >> install DVD.
    >>
    >> Anyone got any advice on that?
    >>
    >> BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    >> which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    >> licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me that
    >> the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >>
    >> Found Images
    >> http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke

    >
    >Max
    >
    >As others have indicated an 'upgrade' path is only available from Vista not
    >XP.
    >So you'll be doing a 'clean' Win7 install, make sure your backups are good.
    >I notice you also mention "computers" (plural), how old are they?
    >
    >I've done several XP to Win7 changeovers since Win7 came out and offer the
    >following thoughts to ponder on.
    >
    >1 Look hard at your hardware.
    >A dual core CPU and 2+GB of RAM is the minimum realistic spec you need.
    >If your old PC was not quick under XP, it's going to struggle under Win7.




    Works Great on a P4 3.2g.

    >2 Download Win7 compatible drivers for your hardware and copy to CD/USB
    >stick "before" you start.
    >Older peripherals are the biggest victim of the change to Win7, same as when
    >mainstream went from Win98 to XP.




    Not true the HP 6L has new Win7 drivers but a 4 year old Epson does not.

    >3 The 32/64 bit choice depends very much on how forward looking you are and
    >whether you're recycling your hardware.
    >If you carrying your hardware forward it will make sense to stay with 32 bit
    >as you are more likely to get drivers in 32 bit.
    >The Motherboard RAM limit may also influence your choice, there is not much
    >sense going 64bit if your motherboard maxes out at 4GB.
    >
    >However going to 64 bit brings relief from this 4GB RAM limit of 32 bit.
    >Be it for Security or Compability reasons one of the technologies that is
    >becoming more prevalent is Virual PC's.
    >With 32 bit Windows practical RAM limit of 3GB you can only realistically
    >run 1 or 2 Virtual PC's with 512MB of Virtual RAM and leave enough to run
    >native apps.
    >64 bit Windows on the other hand is only limited by motherboard maximums and
    >can run as many as you can squeeze in.
    >
    >If you buy the Business or Ultimate versions of Windows 7 you can download
    >for free Microsoft's XP Mode Virtual PC.



    No good on Many CPU's

    Read this

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Bott/?p=946&page=2

    >I've used it for a couple of my customers to run older software that is
    >critical to their business's and it works a treat.
    >On a i5/i7 or Phenom CPU, Virtual XP mode and Win7 64bit gives you the best
    >of both worlds.
    >
    >Best
    >Paul.



    You have not Even read his Post, its for Older systems not a $2000 upgrade you
    are on about..
    Mary Hanna, Dec 27, 2009
    #15
  16. Max Burke

    Richard Guest

    Carnations wrote:
    > On Sun, 27 Dec 2009 01:11:33 +0000, Biggles wrote:
    >
    >> As for Max's question ... Id suggest making sure WHQL drivers exist for
    >> all his hardware and I'm also quite happy with the 64bit version of 7.

    >
    > So what you're saying is in fact that 64bit vs 32bit is quite satisfactory and there is no advantage to
    > staying on 32bit.


    If your hardware is supported, then no, staying with 32 bit is just
    crazy. Particually since with a decent gfx card you can end up with
    under 3 gigs available for ram in 32 bit, and if you SLI then under 2
    gigs available addressing space.
    Richard, Dec 27, 2009
    #16
  17. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    On 27/12/2009 10:19 a.m., Squiggle wrote:
    > Dave Doe threw some characters down the intarwebs:
    >> In article <hh47vg$4ji$-september.org>,
    >> says...
    >>> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >>> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>>
    >>> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers
    >>> needed for Windows 7.
    >>> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped
    >>> using over a year ago.
    >>>
    >>> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64
    >>> bit version?
    >>> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >>> install DVD.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone got any advice on that?

    >>
    >> Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    >> install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    >> 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will
    >> be slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End
    >> of the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars -
    >> and don't let the ads get in the way.
    >>

    > IIRC you can't upgrade from XP, only from Vista, so either way its a
    > fresh install.


    A fresh install is what I planned to do anyway, New OS, get rid of all
    the junk that builds up in XP...

    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 27, 2009
    #17
  18. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    On 27/12/2009 2:16 a.m., Dave Doe wrote:
    > In article<hh47vg$4ji$-september.org>,
    > says...
    >>
    >> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>
    >> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    >> for Windows 7.
    >> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped using
    >> over a year ago.
    >>
    >> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >> version?
    >> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >> install DVD.
    >>
    >> Anyone got any advice on that?

    >
    > Go with the standard upgrade. If you do 64bit, it will be a 'clean'
    > install (you can't go 32 to 64 otherwise). I'd recommend you stay with
    > 32b0it (migrage and keep everything). 64bit - well inerently it will be
    > slower (most apps take way more space, address more space etc). End of
    > the day, the generally run slower than their 32bit counterpars - and
    > don't let the ads get in the way.
    >

    I'll be doing a fresh install (which is what you have to do going from
    XP to Windows 7)
    I'll probably stay with the 32 it version as well, considering the above
    comments.

    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 27, 2009
    #18
  19. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    On 27/12/2009 7:40 a.m., peterwn wrote:
    > On Dec 26, 6:46 pm, Max Burke<> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    >> which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    >> licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    >> that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.
    >>

    > Typical kick Kiwis in the guts by multinationaql corporations. This
    > has been happening for decades - last to see new movies, etc, etc.
    > Kipling had it right - 'last, lonliest, loveliest'.
    >
    > Presumably M$ thinks that Kiwis are less likely to 'pirate' Windows 7
    > so sees no need to offer a cheap rate to Kiwis to encourage them to
    > buy legit copies. Eat your heart out 'Impossible'.



    As usual the reality is different to the 'reality' that 'my OS is better
    that your OS' advocates like to believe in.

    Microsoft originally said Family Pack would only be available in North
    America. However, earlier this week the company extended its release to
    eight countries in Europe -- U.K., Ireland, Germany, France,
    Switzerland, Austria, the Netherlands and Sweden -- because of its
    decision to release Windows 7 with Internet Explorer 8 installed in
    those countries.
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/170959/windows_7_family_pack_available_for_preorder_early_online.html

    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Windows-7-Family-Pack-Available-on-10-Markets-Worldwide-119988.shtml


    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 27, 2009
    #19
  20. Max Burke

    Max Burke Guest

    On 27/12/2009 4:21 p.m., PeeCee wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Max Burke" <> wrote in message
    > news:hh47vg$4ji$-september.org...
    >> I'm getting my computers ready to upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium.
    >> (from XP pro 32bit)
    >>
    >> I've RUN THE Windows 7 adviser, and fixed/updated the 2 drivers needed
    >> for Windows 7.
    >> The only incompatible programme is Outlook express which I stopped
    >> using over a year ago.
    >>
    >> The final decision I need to make is do I install the 32 bit or 64 bit
    >> version?
    >> Windows 7 says I can install either version that are included on the
    >> install DVD.
    >>
    >> Anyone got any advice on that?
    >>
    >> BTW I'm using The windows Family Pack purchased from a local retailer
    >> which gives me three licences for $100.00 each, retail price for one
    >> licence being $223.00, despite a Microsoft representative telling me
    >> that the family pack wasn't going to be sold in New Zealand.


    > Max
    > As others have indicated an 'upgrade' path is only available from Vista
    > not XP.
    > So you'll be doing a 'clean' Win7 install, make sure your backups are good.
    > I notice you also mention "computers" (plural), how old are they?


    My backups are good. I'm 'obsessive' about that. ;-)

    Both about 3 months old.

    Operating System Microsoft Windows XP Professional 32-Bit
    Number Of Processors 1
    Processor Description Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU E5300 @ 2.60GHz
    Total Memory 3328MB
    Total Hard Drive 838GB
    Display 1280 x 1024 pixels, true colour

    > I've done several XP to Win7 changeovers since Win7 came out and offer
    > the following thoughts to ponder on.


    > 1 Look hard at your hardware.


    The hardware is able to run Windows 7, I haven't got high end 'gaming'
    graphics hardware but then I dont need it as I dont run/play many games
    at all.
    The Windows 7 adviser says the computers should be able t run Aero
    without any problems.

    > A dual core CPU and 2+GB of RAM is the minimum realistic spec you need.
    > If your old PC was not quick under XP, it's going to struggle under Win7.


    See above.

    > 2 Download Win7 compatible drivers for your hardware and copy to CD/USB
    > stick "before" you start.
    > Older peripherals are the biggest victim of the change to Win7, same as
    > when mainstream went from Win98 to XP.


    The only hardware that WIndows adviser says I might have problems with
    is a Serial to USB cable and it's drivers that I use to control a radio.
    That's not a real issue...

    > 3 The 32/64 bit choice depends very much on how forward looking you are
    > and whether you're recycling your hardware.


    the only hardware being recycled is an Epson Stylus photo 890 printer.
    It's compatible but I will need to check for updated drivers, once
    Windows seven is installed.

    > If you carrying your hardware forward it will make sense to stay with 32
    > bit as you are more likely to get drivers in 32 bit.
    > The Motherboard RAM limit may also influence your choice, there is not
    > much sense going 64bit if your motherboard maxes out at 4GB.


    It does which is the main reason I was thinking about staying with the
    32bit version.

    > However going to 64 bit brings relief from this 4GB RAM limit of 32 bit.
    > Be it for Security or Compability reasons one of the technologies that
    > is becoming more prevalent is Virual PC's.
    > With 32 bit Windows practical RAM limit of 3GB you can only
    > realistically run 1 or 2 Virtual PC's with 512MB of Virtual RAM and
    > leave enough to run native apps.
    > 64 bit Windows on the other hand is only limited by motherboard maximums
    > and can run as many as you can squeeze in.


    > If you buy the Business or Ultimate versions of Windows 7 you can
    > download for free Microsoft's XP Mode Virtual PC.
    > I've used it for a couple of my customers to run older software that is
    > critical to their business's and it works a treat.
    > On a i5/i7 or Phenom CPU, Virtual XP mode and Win7 64bit gives you the
    > best of both worlds.



    --


    Found Images
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke
    Max Burke, Dec 27, 2009
    #20
    1. Advertising

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