Windows 2000 crash unplugging digital camera

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by beatme101@gmail.com, May 27, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have WIndows 2000 Professional, entirely updated, in every way
    possible with Windows Update and Microsoft Update. You know, latest
    service packs and optional software like .net frameworks.

    Anyway, I wanted to unplug my digital camera. It's a "Nexxtech Mini
    Digital Camera". So there was no unplug/eject icon in the system tray.
    Okay. That should mean it is safe. Well, that and there is no programs
    open to handle the camera. Safe, right? Well, I unplugged it, and I got
    a blue screen with an error on it and then the computer went down. Lost
    all unsaved work and server software went down, etcetera. Bad thing.
    Yeah. So why did that happen and how can I unplug this camera? USB
    should be hot swappable, right?
    , May 27, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. philo Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have WIndows 2000 Professional, entirely updated, in every way
    > possible with Windows Update and Microsoft Update. You know, latest
    > service packs and optional software like .net frameworks.
    >
    > Anyway, I wanted to unplug my digital camera. It's a "Nexxtech Mini
    > Digital Camera". So there was no unplug/eject icon in the system tray.
    > Okay. That should mean it is safe. Well, that and there is no programs
    > open to handle the camera. Safe, right? Well, I unplugged it, and I got
    > a blue screen with an error on it and then the computer went down. Lost
    > all unsaved work and server software went down, etcetera. Bad thing.
    > Yeah. So why did that happen and how can I unplug this camera? USB
    > should be hot swappable, right?
    >



    If you look at the properties...there should be an option (somewhere)
    to enable the "safely unplug" icon in your system tray
    philo, May 27, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Guest

    Wow, I never realized how unbelievably hard it is to reply to a topic
    in these google groups. It's no wonder I got so few responses.

    philo wrote:
    >
    > If you look at the properties...there should be an option (somewhere)
    > to enable the "safely unplug" icon in your system tray


    Okay.. I thought about this for a while.. Trying to figure out what
    properties you could have possibly been talking about.. I decided it
    wasn't the properties of my desktop or any of those files on my
    desktop.. Eventually worked my way into the device manager and went
    into the camera's properties in the hopes that that was the properties
    you spoke of, but I do not see anything useful. There is two tabs:
    General | Driver In the General tab is a Troubleshooter button and a
    Device usage dropdown box. The Driver tab just lets me get driver
    details, uninstall, and update the driver.
    , May 27, 2006
    #3
  4. Guest

    wrote:

    |>Wow, I never realized how unbelievably hard it is to reply to a topic
    |>in these google groups. It's no wonder I got so few responses.

    |>philo wrote:
    |>>
    |>> If you look at the properties...there should be an option (somewhere)
    |>> to enable the "safely unplug" icon in your system tray

    |>Okay.. I thought about this for a while.. Trying to figure out what
    |>properties you could have possibly been talking about.. I decided it
    |>wasn't the properties of my desktop or any of those files on my
    |>desktop.. Eventually worked my way into the device manager and went
    |>into the camera's properties in the hopes that that was the properties
    |>you spoke of, but I do not see anything useful. There is two tabs:
    |>General | Driver In the General tab is a Troubleshooter button and a
    |>Device usage dropdown box. The Driver tab just lets me get driver
    |>details, uninstall, and update the driver.

    Ok, try this.

    Plug in your camera, open Windows Explorer, right click your usb
    camera device, Properties, Hardware, click on your camera again,
    properties again, now Policies and click for quick removal.

    You just didn't look hard enough :)

    --
    joke - priceless
    http://www.blogxero.com/member/dragonstar/200605272711.php
    , May 27, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    wrote:
    > Ok, try this.
    >
    > Plug in your camera, open Windows Explorer, right click your usb
    > camera device, Properties, Hardware, click on your camera again,
    > properties again, now Policies and click for quick removal.
    >
    > You just didn't look hard enough :)



    Wow, I'm late. Okay, I plugged in the camera, opened Windows Explorer..
    Uh, you do realize there is nothing relating to my camera in there,
    right?
    http://www.beatme101.com/images/ss/04-06-06--explorer.jpg
    , Jun 4, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    wrote:

    |> wrote:
    |>> Ok, try this.
    |>>
    |>> Plug in your camera, open Windows Explorer, right click your usb
    |>> camera device, Properties, Hardware, click on your camera again,
    |>> properties again, now Policies and click for quick removal.

    |>> You just didn't look hard enough :)
    |

    |>Wow, I'm late. Okay, I plugged in the camera, opened Windows Explorer..
    |>Uh, you do realize there is nothing relating to my camera in there,
    |>right?
    |>http://www.beatme101.com/images/ss/04-06-06--explorer.jpg

    Open up "My Computer" (seen in the jpg) and see what's hideing there.

    --
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGYNBIMcUGA
    , Jun 4, 2006
    #6
  7. Guest

    , Jun 4, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    I really wish there could be an edit feature here.

    I wanted to also point out that for obvious reasons I am using my
    laptop (still running the same Windows 2000 Professional, no
    differences there) to go through this as I don't want to cause more
    damage to my PC with the camera right now..
    , Jun 4, 2006
    #8
  9. Guest

    wrote:

    |>I really wish there could be an edit feature here.
    |>
    |>I wanted to also point out that for obvious reasons I am using my
    |>laptop (still running the same Windows 2000 Professional, no
    |>differences there) to go through this as I don't want to cause more
    |>damage to my PC with the camera right now..

    Might be a blessing you can't transfer pictures,
    http://www.beatme101.com/images/vacation/

    This ones good - I take it, it's you...
    http://www.beatme101.com/images/me/6.jpg

    First it crash'd now you can't connect - me thinks you have a config
    problem.


    --
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGYNBIMcUGA
    , Jun 4, 2006
    #9
  10. Guest

    wrote:
    > Might be a blessing you can't transfer pictures,
    > http://www.beatme101.com/images/vacation/
    >
    > This ones good - I take it, it's you...
    > http://www.beatme101.com/images/me/6.jpg
    >
    > First it crash'd now you can't connect - me thinks you have a config
    > problem.


    lol, yeah, well, it was my parents who wanted me to put those vacation
    pictures up there :p

    And yes, that's me. From some time ago actually, I've been meaning to
    take a new picture (no idea when I will actually get around to it).

    I can connect the camera, to my PC and laptop, it is connected to my
    laptop right now (and was when I took those two screenshots I linked to
    of course :p ), I just don't WANT to connect it to my PC right now. :p
    , Jun 4, 2006
    #10
  11. Guest

    Okay, it happenned again, only this time with my USB mouse. I
    occasionally unplug it to use with other computers, but this time it
    caused my computer to crash. It is another device that does not use the
    unplug/eject hardware symbol in the system tray. Of all the things that
    are hot-swappable, why would a USB mouse do it?! This is the first time
    out of the hundreds of times I have done it that a USB mouse has caused
    any computer to crash in my experience.
    , Jun 5, 2006
    #11
  12. Guest

    This appears to be the event log entry it caused:

    The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was:
    0x000000d1 (0x00000014, 0x00000002, 0x00000000, 0xaf717e9d). Microsoft
    Windows 2000 [v15.2195]. A dump was saved in:
    C:\WINNT\Minidump\Mini060506-01.dmp.




    And now I'm going to restart and have chkdsk to some thorough fixing as
    it appears that once again this has caused massive data corruption.
    , Jun 5, 2006
    #12
  13. Guest

    wrote:

    |>This appears to be the event log entry it caused:
    |>
    |>The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was:
    |>0x000000d1 (0x00000014, 0x00000002, 0x00000000, 0xaf717e9d). Microsoft
    |>Windows 2000 [v15.2195]. A dump was saved in:
    |>C:\WINNT\Minidump\Mini060506-01.dmp.
    |>
    |>
    |>
    |>
    |>And now I'm going to restart and have chkdsk to some thorough fixing as
    |>it appears that once again this has caused massive data corruption.


    Ok I stole this from another newsgroup, it's for XP but should apply
    to W2K. it involves using VERIFIER to check your drivers
    -------------
    If you want to solve a blue screen do this

    Type verifier in Start Run, follow the wizard but choose All Drivers.
    This will slow down your computer and cause more blue screen crashes
    but will pinpoint what is causing the crash (if the original error
    message didn't). Once you fix it you rerun verifier and turn it off.

    If you can't start after enabling verifier
    choose Last Known Good Configuration at the Failed Boot menu (which
    will
    start without verifier).


    You will be creating a crash dump file in c:\windows\minidump every
    blue screen. Make sure you are set to record minidumps (Small Memory
    Dumps) - type it in Help to see how.

    Then


    Install symbols from <CD Drive Letter>:\SUPPORT\SYMBOLS

    Download
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/installx86.mspx

    Load the crash dump file into windbg
    and read what it says. You may need to tell it where the symbols are.
    Read it.
    Type
    !Analyze -v
    into Windbg's command line.
    (this will hopefully tell you the faulty component)

    If the above is too technical then email the crash dump files to
    davidc @ mvps.org. Don't send me lots of them. Just the one from your
    last crash after you turn verifier on. And only one per mail.

    You can look up specific details here
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/d..._ea8b9fd0-2d81-4a04-a7ed-c1c6a80bd501.xml.asp

    If it indicates faulty memory might be the cause you can get a memory
    tester
    here
    http://oca.microsoft.com/en/wi­ndiag.asp


    If it mentions a core windows system file, meaning it a MS fix is
    required,
    upload a minidump to

    http://oca.microsoft.com

    Also try typing the main error code in Help while online (ie,
    Stop 0x50
    and also try in the 8 digit form
    stop 0x00000050)
    and if there are too many hits use a filename if available. Generally
    memory
    addresses are different for each computer (as each computer has a
    different
    mix of drivers) so parameters that are memory addresses aren't that
    useful for searching, but NTStatus codes are (plus you can look them
    up here
    http://cvs.sourceforge.net/viewcvs.py/mingw/w32api/include/ddk/ntstatus.h?rev=1.2).


    --
    In the spirit of taking things too far, here is a fully functional 5-dimensional
    analog of Rubik's cube.
    http://www.gravitation3d.com/magiccube5d/
    , Jun 5, 2006
    #13
  14. Guest

    wrote:
    > Ok I stole this from another newsgroup, it's for XP but should apply
    > to W2K. it involves using VERIFIER to check your drivers
    > -------------
    > If you want to solve a blue screen do this
    >
    > Type verifier in Start Run, follow the wizard but choose All Drivers.
    > This will slow down your computer and cause more blue screen crashes
    > but will pinpoint what is causing the crash (if the original error
    > message didn't). Once you fix it you rerun verifier and turn it off.
    >
    > If you can't start after enabling verifier
    > choose Last Known Good Configuration at the Failed Boot menu (which
    > will
    > start without verifier).
    >
    >
    > You will be creating a crash dump file in c:\windows\minidump every
    > blue screen. Make sure you are set to record minidumps (Small Memory
    > Dumps) - type it in Help to see how.
    >
    > Then
    >
    >
    > Install symbols from <CD Drive Letter>:\SUPPORT\SYMBOLS
    >
    > Download
    > http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/devtools/debugging/installx86.mspx
    >
    > Load the crash dump file into windbg
    > and read what it says. You may need to tell it where the symbols are.
    > Read it.
    > Type
    > !Analyze -v
    > into Windbg's command line.
    > (this will hopefully tell you the faulty component)
    >
    > If the above is too technical then email the crash dump files to
    > davidc @ mvps.org. Don't send me lots of them. Just the one from your
    > last crash after you turn verifier on. And only one per mail.
    >
    > You can look up specific details here
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/d..._ea8b9fd0-2d81-4a04-a7ed-c1c6a80bd501.xml.asp
    >
    > If it indicates faulty memory might be the cause you can get a memory
    > tester
    > here
    > http://oca.microsoft.com/en/wi­ndiag.asp
    >
    >
    > If it mentions a core windows system file, meaning it a MS fix is
    > required,
    > upload a minidump to
    >
    > http://oca.microsoft.com
    >
    > Also try typing the main error code in Help while online (ie,
    > Stop 0x50
    > and also try in the 8 digit form
    > stop 0x00000050)
    > and if there are too many hits use a filename if available. Generally
    > memory
    > addresses are different for each computer (as each computer has a
    > different
    > mix of drivers) so parameters that are memory addresses aren't that
    > useful for searching, but NTStatus codes are (plus you can look them
    > up here
    > http://cvs.sourceforge.net/viewcvs.py/mingw/w32api/include/ddk/ntstatus.h?rev=1.2).
    >
    >




    Wow.. Uh.. That's quite the amount of stuff.. (verifier does not seem
    to have a wizard) But I would rather not encouter blue screen errors
    (which cause massive data corruption), since I have a choice. Is there
    anything else I can do, or do I just have to leave hot-swappable
    devices plugged in at all times never again to unplug them unless I
    want to shut down my computer first?
    , Jun 5, 2006
    #14
  15. Guest

    wrote:

    |>Wow.. Uh.. That's quite the amount of stuff.. (verifier does not seem
    |>to have a wizard) But I would rather not encouter blue screen errors
    |>(which cause massive data corruption), since I have a choice. Is there
    |>anything else I can do, or do I just have to leave hot-swappable
    |>devices plugged in at all times never again to unplug them unless I
    |>want to shut down my computer first?

    Remove your USB devices and reinstall.

    Go into your bios and change the setting of the USB if any (if on then
    off)

    Start | Run <type in> drwtsn32 <enter>
    look at the application errors and see if a program is involved.

    Start | Run <type in> services.msc <enter>
    check the USB service - play with the recovery options




    --
    In the spirit of taking things too far, here is a fully functional 5-dimensional
    analog of Rubik's cube.
    http://www.gravitation3d.com/magiccube5d/
    , Jun 5, 2006
    #15
  16. Guest

    Hmm, I noticed something in my BIOS, would this problem I am having
    have to do with the "USB 2.0 Controller" setting being set to
    "Disabled"? How are USB devices working since it's disabled? I don't
    understand that one at all..
    , Jun 6, 2006
    #16
  17. Guest

    wrote:

    |>Hmm, I noticed something in my BIOS, would this problem I am having
    |>have to do with the "USB 2.0 Controller" setting being set to
    |>"Disabled"? How are USB devices working since it's disabled? I don't
    |>understand that one at all..

    The Windows OS controls USB; NT had a problem of USB not working if it
    was enabled in the BIOS.


    --
    In the spirit of taking things too far, here is a fully functional 5-dimensional
    analog of Rubik's cube.
    http://www.gravitation3d.com/magiccube5d/
    , Jun 6, 2006
    #17
  18. Guest

    wrote:

    |> wrote:
    |>
    |>|>Hmm, I noticed something in my BIOS, would this problem I am having
    |>|>have to do with the "USB 2.0 Controller" setting being set to
    |>|>"Disabled"? How are USB devices working since it's disabled? I don't
    |>|>understand that one at all..

    |>The Windows OS controls USB; NT had a problem of USB not working if it
    |>was enabled in the BIOS.

    But Yes turn it on.

    --
    In the spirit of taking things too far, here is a fully functional 5-dimensional
    analog of Rubik's cube.
    http://www.gravitation3d.com/magiccube5d/
    , Jun 6, 2006
    #18
  19. Guest

    wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    > |>The Windows OS controls USB; NT had a problem of USB not working if it
    > |>was enabled in the BIOS.
    >
    > But Yes turn it on.
    >



    Do you think that would fix the problem? What about the problem you
    mentioned that comes with turning it on?
    , Jun 6, 2006
    #19
  20. Guest

    wrote:

    |>
    |> wrote:
    |>> wrote:
    |>>
    |>> |>The Windows OS controls USB; NT had a problem of USB not working if it
    |>> |>was enabled in the BIOS.
    |>>
    |>> But Yes turn it on.
    |>>

    |>Do you think that would fix the problem? What about the problem you
    |>mentioned that comes with turning it on?

    You've got problems now, while changing the USB BIOS setting should
    have little or no affect, it might be what sets it right.

    The problem with NT4 was fix'd on a service pack IIRC, and W2K onwards
    never had the problem.

    Why even have the BIOS setting? it's for DOS and other OS's that don't
    control the USB.

    --
    RIAA does not approve - Collect em all
    http://www.milinkito.com/los80.php
    , Jun 6, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. NewsGroupQuestion

    Lost wireless connection when unplugging external hard disk?

    NewsGroupQuestion, Jan 17, 2005, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    521
  2. Drummerboy

    PC wont start without unplugging USB peripherals

    Drummerboy, Jan 1, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    637
    Ingeborg
    Jan 2, 2005
  3. pinueve

    USB needs unplugging to boot up

    pinueve, Feb 28, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    485
    James
    Feb 28, 2005
  4. geralvon

    unplugging a digital camera from USB port

    geralvon, Dec 20, 2003, in forum: Computer Information
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    421
    olfart
    Dec 20, 2003
  5. william316

    pc reboots after unplugging USB Modem

    william316, Aug 29, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    664
    william316
    Aug 29, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page