Win7 - MS apps as 32bit and 64bit

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Franz Leu, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. Franz Leu

    Franz Leu Guest

    Hi

    I am new to 64Bit Windows and I just installed a Win7 64Bit 90 days Test
    version to evaluate.
    I found that most of the native MS apps like Mediaplayer a.s.o. are
    installed twice, in seperate folders for 64Bit and for 32Bit apps.

    Does somebody have a link where I can do some reading to get to know why
    everything is installed twice and why it needs seperate program
    folders for 32Bit and 64Bit apps?

    Thanks
    Franz
    Franz Leu, Oct 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. Franz Leu

    Jeff Gaines Guest

    On 13/10/2009 in message <#fzrk#> Franz Leu
    wrote:

    >Hi
    >
    >I am new to 64Bit Windows and I just installed a Win7 64Bit 90 days Test
    >version to evaluate.
    >I found that most of the native MS apps like Mediaplayer a.s.o. are
    >installed twice, in seperate folders for 64Bit and for 32Bit apps.
    >
    >Does somebody have a link where I can do some reading to get to know why
    >everything is installed twice and why it needs seperate program folders
    >for 32Bit and 64Bit apps?
    >
    >Thanks
    >Franz


    I'm not sure there's much to understand. 64 bit apps go in Program Files
    and 32 bit apps in Program Files (x86). MSFT provides both 32 bit and 64
    bit versions of some apps that are included with Windows and they each get
    installed in their respective folders.

    --
    Jeff Gaines Dorset UK
    By the time you can make ends meet they move the ends
    Jeff Gaines, Oct 13, 2009
    #2
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  3. Franz Leu

    Carlos Guest

    Jim,
    That was correct for Vista x64.
    Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86 and
    x64 versions.
    Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a lower
    priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are the
    preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    Carlos

    "Jim" wrote:

    > 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got 64bit
    > ffdshow.
    >
    >
    >
    Carlos, Oct 13, 2009
    #3
  4. Franz Leu

    Franz Leu Guest

    Carlos schrieb:
    > Jim,
    > That was correct for Vista x64.
    > Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86 and
    > x64 versions.
    > Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a lower
    > priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are the
    > preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Jim" wrote:
    >
    >> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got 64bit
    >> ffdshow.
    >>
    >>
    >>


    OK, thank you guys.
    This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    64Bit version.
    Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    32Bit. ;-)

    Franz
    Franz Leu, Oct 13, 2009
    #4
  5. Very much like the move to 32-bit. Only more so, since MS dropped support
    for ANY 16 bit applications, and for DOS applications. They simply won't
    run. (However, you can use the downloadable Windows VirtualPC plus XPMode to
    run them virtualized.)

    --
    Charlie.
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel


    "Franz Leu" <> wrote in message
    news:eD%...
    > Carlos schrieb:
    >> Jim,
    >> That was correct for Vista x64.
    >> Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86
    >> and x64 versions.
    >> Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a lower
    >> priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are the
    >> preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    >> Carlos
    >>
    >> "Jim" wrote:
    >>
    >>> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got 64bit
    >>> ffdshow.
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    > OK, thank you guys.
    > This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    > mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the 64Bit
    > version.
    > Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    > 32Bit. ;-)
    >
    > Franz
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Oct 13, 2009
    #5
  6. Franz Leu

    Carlos Guest

    Franz,
    Internet Explorer is a clear example of why it exists in two flavours:
    32-bit and 64-bit.
    All add-ins/plugins are fully functional with IE32, as usual.
    Not all add-ins/plugins are functional (Flash isn't) with IE64.
    If you can live without Flash (some enjoy it!) then go for IE64.
    :)
    Carlos

    "Franz Leu" wrote:

    > Carlos schrieb:
    > > Jim,
    > > That was correct for Vista x64.
    > > Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86 and
    > > x64 versions.
    > > Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a lower
    > > priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are the
    > > preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    > > Carlos
    > >
    > > "Jim" wrote:
    > >
    > >> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got 64bit
    > >> ffdshow.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    > OK, thank you guys.
    > This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    > mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    > 64Bit version.
    > Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    > 32Bit. ;-)
    >
    > Franz
    >
    Carlos, Oct 13, 2009
    #6
  7. "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Very much like the move to 32-bit. Only more so, since MS dropped support
    > for ANY 16 bit applications, and for DOS applications. They simply won't
    > run. (However, you can use the downloadable Windows VirtualPC plus XPMode
    > to run them virtualized.)
    >
    > --
    > Charlie.
    > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >
    >
    > "Franz Leu" <> wrote in message
    > news:eD%...
    >> Carlos schrieb:
    >>> Jim,
    >>> That was correct for Vista x64.
    >>> Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86
    >>> and x64 versions.
    >>> Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a
    >>> lower priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are
    >>> the preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    >>> Carlos
    >>>
    >>> "Jim" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got
    >>>> 64bit ffdshow.
    >>>>
    >>>>

    >>
    >> OK, thank you guys.
    >> This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    >> mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    >> 64Bit version.
    >> Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    >> 32Bit. ;-)
    >>
    >> Franz

    >




    Charlie,

    I have a 16 bit application from 1995 that will not run under Windows XP
    Mode. Well, it does, but not on the Windows 7 desktop.

    Any ideas?

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    Richard Urban, Oct 13, 2009
    #7
  8. Franz Leu

    Carlos Guest

    Richard,
    Install freeware virtual machine Virtualbox (www.virtualbox.org).
    Later on install any 32-bit OS you may have stashed in your shelves and try
    your 16-bit "oldie".
    Brute force, but it will surely work!
    :)
    Carlos

    "Richard Urban" wrote:

    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Very much like the move to 32-bit. Only more so, since MS dropped support
    > > for ANY 16 bit applications, and for DOS applications. They simply won't
    > > run. (However, you can use the downloadable Windows VirtualPC plus XPMode
    > > to run them virtualized.)
    > >
    > > --
    > > Charlie.
    > > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    > > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    > >
    > >
    > > "Franz Leu" <> wrote in message
    > > news:eD%...
    > >> Carlos schrieb:
    > >>> Jim,
    > >>> That was correct for Vista x64.
    > >>> Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86
    > >>> and x64 versions.
    > >>> Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a
    > >>> lower priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are
    > >>> the preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    > >>> Carlos
    > >>>
    > >>> "Jim" wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got
    > >>>> 64bit ffdshow.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>
    > >>
    > >> OK, thank you guys.
    > >> This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    > >> mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    > >> 64Bit version.
    > >> Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    > >> 32Bit. ;-)
    > >>
    > >> Franz

    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > Charlie,
    >
    > I have a 16 bit application from 1995 that will not run under Windows XP
    > Mode. Well, it does, but not on the Windows 7 desktop.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > --
    >
    > Richard Urban
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    >
    >
    Carlos, Oct 14, 2009
    #8
  9. "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Richard,
    > Install freeware virtual machine Virtualbox (www.virtualbox.org).
    > Later on install any 32-bit OS you may have stashed in your shelves and
    > try
    > your 16-bit "oldie".
    > Brute force, but it will surely work!
    > :)
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Richard Urban" wrote:
    >
    >> "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Very much like the move to 32-bit. Only more so, since MS dropped
    >> > support
    >> > for ANY 16 bit applications, and for DOS applications. They simply
    >> > won't
    >> > run. (However, you can use the downloadable Windows VirtualPC plus
    >> > XPMode
    >> > to run them virtualized.)
    >> >
    >> > --
    >> > Charlie.
    >> > http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> > http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > "Franz Leu" <> wrote in
    >> > message
    >> > news:eD%...
    >> >> Carlos schrieb:
    >> >>> Jim,
    >> >>> That was correct for Vista x64.
    >> >>> Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in
    >> >>> x86
    >> >>> and x64 versions.
    >> >>> Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a
    >> >>> lower priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those
    >> >>> are
    >> >>> the preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    >> >>> Carlos
    >> >>>
    >> >>> "Jim" wrote:
    >> >>>
    >> >>>> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got
    >> >>>> 64bit ffdshow.
    >> >>>>
    >> >>>>
    >> >>
    >> >> OK, thank you guys.
    >> >> This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to
    >> >> not
    >> >> mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    >> >> 64Bit version.
    >> >> Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    >> >> 32Bit. ;-)
    >> >>
    >> >> Franz
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Charlie,
    >>
    >> I have a 16 bit application from 1995 that will not run under Windows XP
    >> Mode. Well, it does, but not on the Windows 7 desktop.
    >>
    >> Any ideas?
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Richard Urban
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    >>
    >>




    The whole idea of Windows XP Mode is that the 16 bit program should be
    virtualized on the Windows 7 desktop. It isn't. The program works just fine
    in M/S Windows XP Mode under Windows Virtual PC.

    --

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    Richard Urban, Oct 14, 2009
    #9
  10. First, is the RAIL technology working for other applications? That's the
    first requirement. Second, you'll need to install your 16 bit application
    into XP and make sure that it is added to the All Users start menu.

    Unfortunately, right now I don't have any machine that can run XP Mode,
    since all my machines that support hardware virtualization are busy running
    Windows Server 2008 R2. I had a spare machine for this, but it blew a
    motherboard, and I haven't been able to replace it yet. Since it's an OLD
    D920 processor, I'm not terribly inclined to spend much on it. Frankly, I'd
    rather build a new machine from scratch.

    --
    Charlie.
    http:/msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64


    "Richard Urban" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Charlie Russel - MVP" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Very much like the move to 32-bit. Only more so, since MS dropped support
    >> for ANY 16 bit applications, and for DOS applications. They simply won't
    >> run. (However, you can use the downloadable Windows VirtualPC plus XPMode
    >> to run them virtualized.)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Charlie.
    >> http://msmvps.com/blogs/xperts64
    >> http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/charlie.russel
    >>
    >>
    >> "Franz Leu" <> wrote in message
    >> news:eD%...
    >>> Carlos schrieb:
    >>>> Jim,
    >>>> That was correct for Vista x64.
    >>>> Win 7 has embedded codecs for most of the popular formats, both in x86
    >>>> and x64 versions.
    >>>> Moreover Directshow type codecs (the ones used by ffdshow) run at a
    >>>> lower priority. The new buzzword is Windows Media Foundation. Those are
    >>>> the preferred codecs used by WMP and WMC.
    >>>> Carlos
    >>>>
    >>>> "Jim" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> 64bit WMP uses 64bit codecs so it was next to useless until we got
    >>>>> 64bit ffdshow.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>
    >>> OK, thank you guys.
    >>> This means that I just leave these apps as installed by the setup to not
    >>> mess up with other apps that might need the 32Bit version ... or the
    >>> 64Bit version.
    >>> Its kinda like a 'Deja-vu', yeeaaars ago when we moved from 16Bit to
    >>> 32Bit. ;-)
    >>>
    >>> Franz

    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > Charlie,
    >
    > I have a 16 bit application from 1995 that will not run under Windows XP
    > Mode. Well, it does, but not on the Windows 7 desktop.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > --
    >
    > Richard Urban
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows Desktop Experience & Security
    >
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Oct 14, 2009
    #10
  11. Franz Leu

    XS11E Guest

    "Richard Urban" <> wrote:

    > I have a 16 bit application from 1995 that will not run under
    > Windows XP Mode. Well, it does, but not on the Windows 7 desktop.


    Question, is the program written in 16 bit mode or just the installer?

    If it's the installer only you may be able to copy the installed
    program from an earlier machine into Win7, that worked for me because
    the program didn't make any registry entries.

    If it's the whole program your only choice might be to find something
    similar that will run in Win7. I'm guessing the company that created
    the application is not updating it or, like my app mentioned above, the
    new program is so bloated it's (to me) completely unusable!


    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
    XS11E, Oct 14, 2009
    #11
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