Win XP licencing question

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by SomebodyElse, Nov 7, 2003.

  1. SomebodyElse

    SomebodyElse Guest

    A computer I have came with Windows XP Home preinstalled. I now have
    another os on that machine and no longer have Win XP Home installed on it.
    I'm building a computer for a family member (Christmas present) and want
    to put Win XP home onto that machine, but don't see any sense in buying
    another copy when I have a spare licence lying around.

    Is it illegal or against MS's licencing conditions to install it on the
    new machine using my now unused and unwanted product code?

    I don't see why it should be, since it's still being installed/used on one
    machine at any one time.

    The other thing is that I don't have any install disks with it, only the
    system recovery/install disks that came with it. It didn't include the OS
    disks themselves. Obviously these system disks won't work with another
    computer/hardware configuration, so I'd need to borrow an installation
    disk. Surely this is fine if I'm using a legitimate product licence code??

    It all seems fine to me, but MS have some weird licensing restrictions,
    so I just thought I'd check.

    Cheers

    - Scott
     
    SomebodyElse, Nov 7, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. SomebodyElse

    steve Guest

    SomebodyElse allegedly said:

    > It all seems fine to me, but MS have some weird licensing restrictions,
    > so I just thought I'd check.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > - Scott


    As far as I know, the vendor of your PC got an extra good price for selling
    you a copy of Windows tied to the machine you bought.

    You usually can't legally install it anywhere else. Best to read the T's &
    C's that came with your system.

    When you get sick of such restrictions, try Linux. No such hassles. Download
    the CDs and legally install it on every machine you can get your hands
    on....

    No worries. Kiss Bill G and his "silly rules" goodbye.

    "It's a hard road, boy..."

    ...and you thought they were selling beer, right? :)

    --
    defenestrate: The act of throwing Windows out the window and replacing it on
    your PC with some other operating system.
     
    steve, Nov 7, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. SomebodyElse

    techie Guest

    On Thu, 06 Nov 2003 18:51:14 -0600, SomebodyElse wrote:

    > Is it illegal or against MS's licencing conditions to install it on the
    > new machine using my now unused and unwanted product code?


    It depends on the license. OEM licenses are tied to the first machine
    you install it on. After that you can't move it to another system no
    matter what. There's been a lot of screaming on the Windows XP group
    about this. One guy wanted to learn all he could about XP on an
    expendable test system before moving it to his mission-critical business
    computer. Another bought another machine expecting to move his XP to
    that and sell the old one with Win98 installed. Someone else had a
    machine stolen, and yet another lost the machine in a fire. In all of
    all these cases the owners were screwed and Product Acivation ensured
    that they stayed that way.

    If you have a non-OEM license then you can move the OS from machine to
    machine. If it's been at least 120 days since your last install then you
    should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft
    and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on YOUR
    computer.

    Such is life as a pawn of the Evil Empire. :)


    --
    ____ ___ _______ ____ ___
    / __/______ ___ / _ )/ __/ _ \ / __/ < / http://www.FreeBSD.org
    / _// __/ -_) -_) _ |\ \/ // / /__ \_ / / <-- kewl figlet sig!
    /_/ /_/ \__/\__/____/___/____/ /____(_)_/ http://www.figlet.org
     
    techie, Nov 7, 2003
    #3
  4. SomebodyElse

    Steven H Guest

    In article <>,
    lid says...

    > YOUR software


    it isnt

    > that YOU paid for


    you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    installed it

    > on YOUR computer.


    you got that part right.

    --
    ===================================================
    Steven H
     
    Steven H, Nov 7, 2003
    #4
  5. SomebodyElse

    Fran Guest

    techie wrote:
    > should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft
    > and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on YOUR
    > computer.
    >
    > Such is life as a pawn of the Evil Empire. :)
    >
    >


    Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft and beg permission to use
    THEIR software that YOU licenced for use on THAT computer.

    "I Agree" has a lot to answer for.

    Fran
    :):):)
     
    Fran, Nov 7, 2003
    #5
  6. SomebodyElse

    Roger Watts Guest

    "techie" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Thu, 06 Nov 2003 18:51:14 -0600, SomebodyElse wrote:


    <snip>
    > about this. One guy wanted to learn all he could about XP on an
    > expendable test system before moving it to his mission-critical business
    > computer.


    This is like fighting for peace
     
    Roger Watts, Nov 7, 2003
    #6
  7. SomebodyElse

    steve Guest

    techie allegedly said:

    > If you have a non-OEM license then you can move the OS from machine to
    > machine. If it's been at least 120 days since your last install then you
    > should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft
    > and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on YOUR
    > computer.
    >
    > Such is life as a pawn of the Evil Empire. :)


    I saw this coming in 1998/99 and moved to linux at home exclusively but for
    two "legacy" Win98SE systems (one is dual boot).

    Linux = Freedom


    --
    defenestrate: The act of throwing Windows out the window and replacing it on
    your PC with some other operating system.
     
    steve, Nov 7, 2003
    #7
  8. SomebodyElse

    SomebodyElse Guest

    On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 14:59:03 +1300, Steven H wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > lid says...
    >
    >> YOUR software

    >
    > it isnt
    >
    >> that YOU paid for

    >
    > you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    > software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    > installed it
    >
    >> on YOUR computer.

    >
    > you got that part right.


    Ok. So in that case, can I upgrade my computer? Shouldn't be any problem
    with that should there?

    Say I upgrade the motherboard & cpu. And the RAM. Oh, and the network and
    sound cards. But I leave the Hard drive from the original computer, and
    the video card. Probably the cdrw and floppy drive too.

    Then I reinstall Windows, with my original product license.

    Is that ok?

    And then, because I don't need it and have the bits leftover to build
    another machine, I give it to a family member. Nothing wrong with that is
    there?

    - Scott
     
    SomebodyElse, Nov 7, 2003
    #8
  9. SomebodyElse

    techie Guest

    On Thu, 06 Nov 2003 23:15:18 -0600, steve wrote:

    > techie allegedly said:
    >
    >> If you have a non-OEM license then you can move the OS from machine to
    >> machine. If it's been at least 120 days since your last install then
    >> you should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call
    >> Microsoft and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on
    >> YOUR computer.
    >>
    >> Such is life as a pawn of the Evil Empire. :)

    >
    > I saw this coming in 1998/99 and moved to linux at home exclusively but
    > for two "legacy" Win98SE systems (one is dual boot).
    >
    > Linux = Freedom


    Same here. I heard about WPA being planned for Windows XP and decided
    the time had come to bite the Linux bullet.

    Contrary to expectations, it was an extremely tasty bullet. :)

    I used to dual-boot Windows but swore an end to all Microsoft software
    in my household when MS started spreading FUD about Linux. The only time
    since then that I've used Windows for my own computing was a few months
    ago when my laptop was down and I had to borrow someone else's. It was
    an interesting experience - Windows felt as alien to me then, as Linux
    had three years earlier. And all the things that I used to think made
    Windows so much better than Linux just didn't seem important anymore.
    But I really missed a lot of things about Linux (and FreeBSD, of course)
    that Windows didn't do (or didn't do as well, or didn't do without
    investing $1500 in software that would be obsolete in a few years).
     
    techie, Nov 7, 2003
    #9
  10. SomebodyElse

    Steven H Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 14:59:03 +1300, Steven H wrote:
    >
    > > In article <>,
    > > lid says...
    > >
    > >> YOUR software

    > >
    > > it isnt
    > >
    > >> that YOU paid for

    > >
    > > you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    > > software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    > > installed it
    > >
    > >> on YOUR computer.

    > >
    > > you got that part right.

    >
    > Ok. So in that case, can I upgrade my computer? Shouldn't be any problem
    > with that should there?
    >
    > Say I upgrade the motherboard & cpu. And the RAM. Oh, and the network and
    > sound cards. But I leave the Hard drive from the original computer, and
    > the video card. Probably the cdrw and floppy drive too.
    >
    > Then I reinstall Windows, with my original product license.
    >
    > Is that ok?
    >
    > And then, because I don't need it and have the bits leftover to build
    > another machine, I give it to a family member. Nothing wrong with that is
    > there?


    lol - i like it!

    shouldnt be a problem
    --
    ===================================================
    Steven H
     
    Steven H, Nov 7, 2003
    #10
  11. SomebodyElse

    steve Guest

    techie allegedly said:

    > The only time
    > since then that I've used Windows for my own computing was a few months
    > ago when my laptop was down and I had to borrow someone else's. It was
    > an interesting experience - Windows felt as alien to me then, as Linux
    > had three years earlier. And all the things that I used to think made
    > Windows so much better than Linux just didn't seem important anymore.
    > But I really missed a lot of things about Linux (and FreeBSD, of course)
    > that Windows didn't do (or didn't do as well, or didn't do without
    > investing $1500 in software that would be obsolete in a few years).


    I know exactly what you mean.

    This is why I say Linux *is* ready for the desktop.

    It's just that some desktop users aren't ready for Linux.

    But we're all perfect, so we have to blame the software. :)

    --
    defenestrate: The act of throwing Windows out the window and replacing it on
    your PC with some other operating system.
     
    steve, Nov 7, 2003
    #11
  12. SomebodyElse

    Allistar Guest

    Fran wrote:

    > techie wrote:
    >> should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft
    >> and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on YOUR
    >> computer.
    >>
    >> Such is life as a pawn of the Evil Empire. :)
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft and beg permission to use
    > THEIR software that YOU licenced for use on THAT computer.
    >
    > "I Agree" has a lot to answer for.
    >
    > Fran
    > :):):)


    Indeed it does. I never just click through those agreements anymore. I
    always make sure I read them and make sure what I'm getting into. I have no
    issue with sending software back if I don;t agree to the terms of the
    license.

    Allistar.
     
    Allistar, Nov 7, 2003
    #12
  13. SomebodyElse

    R-Slicks Guest

    On Fri, 07 Nov 2003 13:51:14 +1300, SomebodyElse <>
    wrote:

    >A computer I have came with Windows XP Home preinstalled. I now have
    >another os on that machine and no longer have Win XP Home installed on it.
    >I'm building a computer for a family member (Christmas present) and want
    >to put Win XP home onto that machine, but don't see any sense in buying
    >another copy when I have a spare licence lying around.
    >
    >Is it illegal or against MS's licencing conditions to install it on the
    >new machine using my now unused and unwanted product code?
    >
    >I don't see why it should be, since it's still being installed/used on one
    >machine at any one time.
    >
    >The other thing is that I don't have any install disks with it, only the
    >system recovery/install disks that came with it. It didn't include the OS
    >disks themselves. Obviously these system disks won't work with another
    >computer/hardware configuration, so I'd need to borrow an installation
    >disk. Surely this is fine if I'm using a legitimate product licence code??
    >
    >It all seems fine to me, but MS have some weird licensing restrictions,
    >so I just thought I'd check.
    >
    >Cheers
    >
    > - Scott


    Short answer is no. If you had FPP then probably, but as yours is oem
    it is tied to that machine.

    --
    DO NOT reply to - it is simply a spam catch.
    You can, if you wish, try "news .at. preou .dot. com"
     
    R-Slicks, Nov 7, 2003
    #13
  14. SomebodyElse

    Mainlander Guest

    In article <>,
    lid says...
    > On Thu, 06 Nov 2003 18:51:14 -0600, SomebodyElse wrote:
    >
    > > Is it illegal or against MS's licencing conditions to install it on the
    > > new machine using my now unused and unwanted product code?

    >
    > It depends on the license. OEM licenses are tied to the first machine
    > you install it on. After that you can't move it to another system no
    > matter what. There's been a lot of screaming on the Windows XP group
    > about this. One guy wanted to learn all he could about XP on an
    > expendable test system before moving it to his mission-critical business
    > computer. Another bought another machine expecting to move his XP to
    > that and sell the old one with Win98 installed. Someone else had a
    > machine stolen, and yet another lost the machine in a fire. In all of
    > all these cases the owners were screwed and Product Acivation ensured
    > that they stayed that way.
    >
    > If you have a non-OEM license then you can move the OS from machine to
    > machine. If it's been at least 120 days since your last install then you
    > should have no problem. Otherwise you'll likely have to call Microsoft
    > and beg permission to use YOUR software that YOU paid for on YOUR
    > computer.


    The software is sold more cheaply on OEM license, the terms of the
    license conditions being the tradeoff.
     
    Mainlander, Nov 10, 2003
    #14
  15. SomebodyElse

    Julian Visch Guest

    Steven H wrote:

    > In article <>,
    > lid says...
    >
    >
    >>YOUR software
    >>

    >
    > it isnt
    >
    >
    >>that YOU paid for
    >>

    >
    > you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    > software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    > installed it


    Generally we did not install it initially and hence did not agree to any
    said T&C. Microsoft could easily get challenged to the stupid eula
    as how can I agree to something they don't provide and keep as small print.

    But then windows is useless anyway as with all the security problems one
    can't as a business risk having it online for fear of infection.
    None of its products are able to produce standard complient web pages so
    you need to buy dreamweaver before you can put things on the web,
    although this doesn't stop several businesses from trying which makes
    them look unprofessional.
     
    Julian Visch, Nov 14, 2003
    #15
  16. SomebodyElse

    Steven H Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Steven H wrote:


    > > you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    > > software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    > > installed it

    >
    > Generally we did not install it initially and hence did not agree to any
    > said T&C.


    your using the software so you agree to the conditions it comes with

    > Microsoft could easily get challenged to the stupid eula
    > as how can I agree to something they don't provide and keep as small print.


    then challenge them

    > But then windows is useless anyway as with all the security problems


    what security problems?

    > one can't as a business risk having it online for fear of infection.


    CRAP

    > None of its products are able to produce standard complient web pages so
    > you need to buy dreamweaver before you can put things on the web


    if you are a professional web developer you will be using dreamweaver
    anyway

    > although this doesn't stop several businesses from trying which makes
    > them look unprofessional.


    who the **** cares whether HTML is fully compiliant - NO BODY but Geeks.

    --
    ===================================================
    Steven H
     
    Steven H, Nov 15, 2003
    #16
  17. SomebodyElse

    Invisible Guest

    On Sat, 15 Nov 2003 15:02:55 +1300, Steven H <> wrote:

    >> But then windows is useless anyway as with all the security problems

    >
    >what security problems?


    LOL
     
    Invisible, Nov 15, 2003
    #17
  18. SomebodyElse

    Julian Visch Guest

    Steven H wrote:

    > In article <>, says...
    >
    >>Steven H wrote:
    >>

    >
    >>>you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    >>>software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    >>>installed it
    >>>

    >>Generally we did not install it initially and hence did not agree to any
    >>said T&C.
    >>

    >
    > your using the software so you agree to the conditions it comes with



    What conditions, they are no where listed and there is no mention of any
    conditions when I purchased the machine so any such conditions would
    have no validity if brought to trial.


    >
    >>Microsoft could easily get challenged to the stupid eula
    >>as how can I agree to something they don't provide and keep as small print.
    >>

    >
    > then challenge them



    I may do that if I can't find a way to connect up to the internet
    without breaches in security or performance.


    >
    >>But then windows is useless anyway as with all the security problems
    >>

    >
    > what security problems?



    Viruses, you may have heard of them, my mail box certainly has.


    >
    >>one can't as a business risk having it online for fear of infection.
    >>

    >
    > CRAP



    Ok you can spend money and buy a firewall, but I am talking about as is.

    And I myself won't be accessing the internet with MS until I do just that

    which is a real pain.


    >>None of its products are able to produce standard complient web pages so
    >>you need to buy dreamweaver before you can put things on the web
    >>

    >
    > if you are a professional web developer you will be using dreamweaver
    > anyway



    I am and don't.


    >
    >>although this doesn't stop several businesses from trying which makes
    >>them look unprofessional.
    >>

    >
    > who the **** cares whether HTML is fully compiliant - NO BODY but Geeks.



    You don?t care if the ?format? looks crap or not?

    If it is terrible to read as in my deliberate line above then yes people
    do care.
     
    Julian Visch, Nov 15, 2003
    #18
  19. SomebodyElse

    Max Burke Guest

    > Julian Visch scribbled:
    > I may do that if I can't find a way to connect up to the internet
    > without breaches in security or performance.
    > Ok you can spend money and buy a firewall, but I am talking about as
    > is.
    > And I myself won't be accessing the internet with MS until I do just
    > that
    > which is a real pain.


    Open source critics also argue that open source can lead to a false sense of
    security. They say that just because the source code is available doesn't
    guarantee that anyone is reading it. Nor does it mean that all the bugs have
    been found and fixed. Many users install and use open source software
    without ever looking at the code. They assume someone else has already
    scanned it for possible vulnerabilities. Undetected bugs have lingered in
    some popular open source packages for years. This is a legitimate concern.
    But make no mistake, simply being open source is no guarantee of security.
    Elias Levy, "Wide Open Source"
    http://online.securityfocus.com/news/19

    This week OSS/Linux advisories.....
    http://www.linuxsecurity.com/advisories/index.html
    http://www.zdnet.com.au/itmanager/technology/story/0,2000029587,20275738,00.htm
    http://www.opennet.ru/base/linux/
    http://www.partyvibe.com/flavour/linux/security.htm
    http://www.tummy.com/Software/isinglass
    http://lists.debian.org/debian-security-announce/debian-security-announce-2003/threads.html


    --
    mlvburke@#%&*.net.nz
    Replace the obvious with paradise to email me.
    See Found Images at:
    http://homepages.paradise.net.nz/~mlvburke/
     
    Max Burke, Nov 15, 2003
    #19
  20. SomebodyElse

    Mainlander Guest

    In article <>,
    says...
    > In article <>, says...
    > > Steven H wrote:

    >
    > > > you didnt pay for the SOFTWARE you paid for the right to USE the
    > > > software in accordance with the T&C that YOU AGREED to when you
    > > > installed it

    > >
    > > Generally we did not install it initially and hence did not agree to any
    > > said T&C.

    >
    > your using the software so you agree to the conditions it comes with
    >
    > > Microsoft could easily get challenged to the stupid eula
    > > as how can I agree to something they don't provide and keep as small print.

    >
    > then challenge them
    >
    > > But then windows is useless anyway as with all the security problems

    >
    > what security problems?
    >
    > > one can't as a business risk having it online for fear of infection.

    >
    > CRAP
    >
    > > None of its products are able to produce standard complient web pages so
    > > you need to buy dreamweaver before you can put things on the web

    >
    > if you are a professional web developer you will be using dreamweaver
    > anyway
    >
    > > although this doesn't stop several businesses from trying which makes
    > > them look unprofessional.

    >
    > who the **** cares whether HTML is fully compiliant - NO BODY but Geeks.


    you have such a big mouth, you could easily be mistaken for Woger
     
    Mainlander, Nov 16, 2003
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. KarlInTheNHS

    Licencing and TS

    KarlInTheNHS, Nov 21, 2003, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    481
    Guest
    Nov 21, 2003
  2. Rob

    PIX licencing question

    Rob, Mar 29, 2006, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    556
    Erik Tamminga
    Mar 29, 2006
  3. Jim

    Windows licencing agreement query

    Jim, Sep 16, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    493
    Ralph Wade Phillips
    Sep 17, 2005
  4. bAZZ

    xp licencing 2nd hand machine

    bAZZ, Aug 11, 2004, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    455
    Gurble
    Aug 13, 2004
  5. peterwn

    Windows licencing

    peterwn, Jan 18, 2011, in forum: NZ Computing
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    510
    ~misfit~
    Jan 23, 2011
Loading...

Share This Page