Will Linux eventually take over the desktop market?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Lucas Tam, Apr 16, 2004.

  1. Lucas Tam

    Lucas Tam Guest

    With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?
    Lucas Tam, Apr 16, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Here in alt.os.linux.slackware,
    (Lucas Tam) spake unto us, saying:

    >With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >more ubiquitous than Windows?


    Yes, it's certainly conceivable. The commoditization of the OS layer
    may be a natural tendency as the computing world continues to mature.

    Whether it is *probable* or not depends on a huge number of factors,
    many of them likely beyond our knowledge at this time. Things change.

    Keep in mind, though, that Windows is proprietary, and that the continued
    development of the Windows platform depends quite heavily on the relative
    financial health of its creator (Microsoft Corporation).

    Linux development has no such dependency, and it can move forward in a
    multithreaded manner which even financial powerhouses like MS will have
    a hard time keeping up with, at least in the long term.

    >Would DRM be a factor?


    It might be for some, not for others.

    --
    -Rich Steiner >>>---> http://www.visi.com/~rsteiner >>>---> Eden Prairie, MN
    OS/2 + eCS + Linux + Win95 + DOS + PC/GEOS + Executor = PC Hobbyist Heaven!
    Applications analyst/designer/developer (14 yrs) seeking employment.
    See web site above for resume/CV and background.
    Richard Steiner, Apr 16, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. [Followup-To: header set to alt.os.linux.slackware]
    Lucas Tam wrote:
    > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > more ubiquitous than Windows?


    before you convince yourself that linux will take over the desktop, the
    following links may be interesting to read:

    <http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cups-horror.html>

    <http://firstmonday.org/issues/issue9_4/levesque/index.html>

    <http://daringfireball.net/2004/04/spray_on_usability>

    <http://mpt.phrasewise.com/discuss/msgReader$173>

    in short, the opinions expressed in these links convince me that it will be
    a long time before linux becomes dominant on the desktop, if it ever
    will. we may see it deployed more in certain strictly defined environments
    (e.g. companies where the employers only need to use a few pre-defined
    apps) but it will not easily become a generic desktop OS for users.

    > Would DRM be a factor?


    it will, but i have no idea in what direction it will push linux. it could
    be that in order to get away from DRM, more people will consider switching
    to linux, but at the same time, if DRM becomes integrated with hardware, it
    will probably hinder the development of linux.

    --
    Joost Kremers
    Selbst in die Unterwelt dringt durch Spalten Licht
    EN:SiS(9)
    Joost Kremers, Apr 16, 2004
    #3
  4. Lucas Tam

    Amused Guest

    Lucas Tam wrote:

    > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?


    Follow the money.
    It's a very powerful and tireless force.

    Those of us advocating linux, open source, fair use, and things which seem
    'correct' can only go so far.
    Those who see money by pursuing copy protections, patents and other factors
    which multiply their income will continue to mount pressure until they get
    what they want.
    Is the cause hopeless?

    No.

    If enough people are using linux and it turns out that DRM is inconvient, or
    other things are just plain annoying, it only helps to show the flaws in
    those laws.

    So....

    My suggestion is....
    If you've got a patch, improvement, anything, ...then try to improve linux
    whatever way you see best.
    The better linux becomes, the more people use it, the more people using it,
    the more people will be aware of flaws in the law.

    ....just finished reading this:
    http://linux.org.au/papers/fta-paper.html
    ....appears Australians need to start writing their MPs.
    Amused, Apr 16, 2004
    #4
  5. > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?


    Put down the crack pipe.
    Randall Ainsworth, Apr 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Lucas Tam

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Lucas Tam wrote:

    > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?


    Sure, and Switzerland will someday rule over the entire world.
    Ron Hunter, Apr 16, 2004
    #6
  7. Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    >
    > Sure, and Switzerland will someday rule over the entire world.


    http://flagspot.net/flags/ch.html

    Viva La Ubiquitous Knife !!!
    It's New! It's Beige!, Apr 16, 2004
    #7
  8. Lucas Tam

    Glen Clark Guest

    Ron Hunter wrote:
    > Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    >
    > Sure, and Switzerland will someday rule over the entire world.


    Well good things are happening to GNU/Linux at the moment, investment
    from major companies and rich countries. Interest from firms,
    governments, websites and even desktop users is increasing the awareness
    of GNU/Linux among the general public, however GNU/Linux is still
    someway behind Windows in easy of installation, general support from 3rd
    parties, games market etc. which are major advantages for Microsoft,
    however all this support for making linux into something to challenge
    Microsoft is helping and slowly it is gaining more of a market share
    from Microsoft, however Microsoft are very underhanded in the way they
    deal with competition and wont just give up, they will fight a bitter
    fight, so even with major investment in GNU/Linux, the way i see it is
    more people/companies/government will try to promote/fund GNU/Linux in
    hopes they can defeat and lose reliance on Microsoft. Take Korea, Japan
    & China the reasons for funding Linux are probably more to do with
    getting away from MS than technical advantages of Linux. Also you have
    to look at the speed of which each OS is developing, its easier to see
    with Linux as upgrades are realsead all the time but no so easy with MS
    as they realse upgrades once every few years. But it does look like
    Linux is developing and evolving at a faster pace than Windows. a
    critical time for GNU/Linux is the next 2 years, as Longhorn is due till
    2006 so i see this as an important time to grab a market share. The
    critical time for windows is the realsea of Longhorn, i think it would
    be much better evaluate the position of each OS when Longhorn is realsed
    and the months that follow.

    Thank you
    Glen
    Glen Clark, Apr 16, 2004
    #8
  9. Lucas Tam

    Guy Macon Guest

    Lucas Tam <> says...

    >With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?


    Why did you post this to rec.photo.digital? Why waste the time of
    people wanting to read about digital photography with this?

    Why did you post this to alt.os.linux.slackware? That group isn't for
    general Linux discussions - it is for discussions about Slackware.

    Could those of you who choose to reply to this thread please not
    crosspost to newsgroups that you don't participate in?
    Guy Macon, Apr 16, 2004
    #9
  10. Lucas Tam

    Alex Guest

    Lucas Tam wrote:

    > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?


    I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer shops.
    Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the desktop,
    your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.

    I have like 3 Linux bumper stickers on my car, and most folks think Linux is a
    band or something. Everyone, even non-computer users, know who Bill Gates is
    and what Windows is, but most have never even heard of Linux. Seriously! If
    the bigger computer vendors would start offering either Red Hat Enterprise WS or
    SuSE 9.1 (something with support for non-savvy folks) on HOME computers (not
    only corporate workstations and servers), this would definately give Linux the
    push it needs. Until then, I'm affraid Linux will never rise much higher then
    it is today.

    Take care,

    Alex.
    Alex, Apr 16, 2004
    #10
  11. Lucas Tam

    imbsysop Guest

    On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 08:44:03 -0500, Alex <> wrote:

    >Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    >I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    >Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer shops.
    > Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the desktop,
    >your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.

    snip

    started Linux in early 1996 (RH4.0) and Linux was going to blow all
    the rest out of the waters .. we're almost 10 years later now and
    nothing has been blown out of the water yet on the contrary ..
    if one checks the Linux registrations counter then & now .. hmmm well
    ... although not very conclusive but I'm having a 63K+ number .. :)
    imbsysop, Apr 16, 2004
    #11
  12. Lucas Tam

    Mike Guest

    On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 05:45:20 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

    > Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    > Sure, and Switzerland will someday rule over the entire world.


    Damn, I never would have guessed. Hopefully, they'll hand out nice watches
    to everyone after they take over.

    -- Mike --
    Mike, Apr 16, 2004
    #12
  13. Lucas Tam

    Pandora Xero Guest

    Alex <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    > > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    > I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    > Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer shops.
    > Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the desktop,
    > your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.
    >
    > I have like 3 Linux bumper stickers on my car, and most folks think Linux is a
    > band or something. Everyone, even non-computer users, know who Bill Gates is
    > and what Windows is, but most have never even heard of Linux. Seriously! If
    > the bigger computer vendors would start offering either Red Hat Enterprise WS or
    > SuSE 9.1 (something with support for non-savvy folks) on HOME computers (not
    > only corporate workstations and servers), this would definately give Linux the
    > push it needs. Until then, I'm affraid Linux will never rise much higher then
    > it is today.
    >
    > Take care,
    >
    > Alex.


    It's quite unfortunate, but you're right. Whilst HP and IBM do make
    linux systems, they rarely advertise them, as they are business
    workstations. I was talking computers at school, and some kid was
    complaining about windoze, and said "...but what else is there, the
    only other OS is MacOS" as if he's never even heard of linux. Another
    person, a "friend" of mine, says "Microsoft must be doing something
    right if everybody uses their OS." Of coures M$ is doing something
    right, if your definition of right happens to include conniving
    trickery, intellectual property theft, and bullying.

    I think that as soon as M$ goes down, Linux will finally get the
    recognition it deserves. And with windoze's new "piracy-protection"
    scheme, their downfall might not be too far off, perhaps five years or
    so. but the question to ponder is not "Will Linux eventually take over
    the desktop market?", but rather when it does, which distro will be
    more dominant?

    I have used windoze since its "DOS GUI" days (3.1) and have only
    recently stopped using it on my computer, after about four or five
    months of phasing out. I have had a purely Linux system for only a
    month or so, and have gone through about 5 distros to get to what i
    now have. I am currently convinced that if any one Linux maker stands
    will stand up to Micro$oft, it would be RedHat, because of their
    setup, and because they have remained in the top three distros since i
    first heard of them (on a Detroit, MI newscast sometime in '96).

    Case in Point: User-Friendliness
    Micro$oft, ever since the "DOS GUI" days, has strived for a
    user-friendly interface. This is one thing that Linux, by definition,
    can never have. The prime goals of any linux distro are: 1.
    Functionality and 2. Stability. Functionality comes at the cost of
    user-friendliness, but doesn't necessarily have to coincide with
    stability. the M$-DOS text interface, for example. prime example of
    functionality, user-friendliness completely lacking, and stability,
    umm... what stability? The problem is that user-friendliness and
    functionality cannot coexist. Thus, people will settle for a
    user-friendly OS that's easier to get used to. Then they will get tied
    into it, and won't be able to see that the user-friendly OS is the
    problem. (no offense to any overly religious people, but...) It's much
    like any religion vs. atheism. Religion is an escape from harsh
    reality, and atheism is the acceptance of reality. there are more
    religious people in the world because it's easier to get used to. In
    effect, the battle between Linux and Windoze is more of a war than a
    battle, and a holy war at that.

    note: i support neither religion nor atheism, as they both have their
    place
    note: i support Linux, but Windoze has its place, too... in the trash
    can (not the Recycle Bin, mind you)
    Pandora Xero, Apr 17, 2004
    #13
  14. Lucas Tam

    cyberoptiq Guest

    Well, the original question was "Will Linux eventually take over the
    desktop market?". Probably not entirely but I would bet that soon
    Linux will be neck and neck with the other's and just as good. IBM and
    other's are selling server's with Linux installed so it's really just
    a matter of time.
    cyberoptiq, Apr 17, 2004
    #14
  15. Lucas Tam

    Rich Grise Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:6x74two63kex$...
    > On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 05:45:20 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:
    >
    > > Lucas Tam wrote:
    > >
    > >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    > >
    > > Sure, and Switzerland will someday rule over the entire world.

    >
    > Damn, I never would have guessed. Hopefully, they'll hand out nice watches
    > to everyone after they take over.
    >


    I've heard that:
    In Heaven,
    the English run the police,
    the Germans do the repairs,
    the Swiss run the railroads,
    the French do the cooking, and
    the Italians are the lovers.
    In Hell,
    the Germans run the police,
    the French do the repairs,
    the Italians run the railroads,
    the English do the cooking,
    and the Swiss are the lovers.

    ;-)
    Rich
    Rich Grise, Apr 17, 2004
    #15
  16. Lucas Tam

    Alan Hicks Guest

    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
    Hash: SHA1

    Note: You need to set a Followup-To: header when cross-posting.

    In alt.os.linux.slackware, Pandora Xero dared to utter,
    > Case in Point: User-Friendliness
    > This is one thing that Linux, by definition,
    > can never have. The prime goals of any linux distro are: 1.
    > Functionality and 2. Stability.


    Actually the prime goals for Slackware are stability and ease-of-use.

    > Functionality comes at the cost of
    > user-friendliness


    FUD. Site your source. What neccessarily means that functionality comes
    at the expense of user-friendliness? Sometimes the functionality you
    are adding IS user-friendliness. Case in point, gnu-tar. Before
    gnu-tar, if you wanted to open a tar.gz file, you had to run it through
    gunzip, then pipe the data to tar to untar it. gnutar added the -z
    option which automatically does this. Increased functionality, and
    user-friendliness hand-in-hand.

    $ gnuzip something.tar.gz | tar -xv
    $ tar -xvzf something.tar.gz

    I can tell you which I prefer.

    > The problem is that user-friendliness and
    > functionality cannot coexist.


    More FUD. I just proved your wrong above. You're making blanket
    statements that you believe to be true without closely examining the
    problem and proposed solutions.

    > Religion is an escape from harsh
    > reality, and atheism is the acceptance of reality.
    >
    > note: i support neither religion nor atheism, as they both have their
    > place


    Then why make such a blanket statement only intended to excite people's
    temper? You state later that you support neither religion nor atheism,
    yet I say actions speak louder than words. Your original statement
    clearly shows favoritism towards atheism, and simply states that all
    religions are false. People don't appreciate such double-speak. It just
    makes you look like a troll.

    In any event, take the religion stuff to another newsgroup; this is not
    the place for such.

    - --
    It is better to hear the rebuke of the wise,
    Than for a man to hear the song of fools.
    Ecclesiastes 7:5
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v1.2.1 (GNU/Linux)

    iD8DBQFAgUL5L3KiNGOqr6ERAiTLAJ9HKDMdzYScbCHaOecJDnHv7KFKkACfWMRh
    hGitibRzzcX3n83yabeRHPw=
    =JBHX
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Alan Hicks, Apr 17, 2004
    #16
  17. Lucas Tam

    Rich Grise Guest

    One Real-World App , poss. 2 was Re: Will Linux eventually take over the desktop market?

    "Alex" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Lucas Tam wrote:
    >
    > > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    >
    > I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    > Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer

    shops.
    > Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the

    desktop,
    > your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.


    Well, I'm about to do an experiment, maybe. I work at a machine shop/
    fabricator. I'm essentially the engineering department - there's Joe,
    the PHB, Karen, his wife, the receptionist/CFO, Shaunna, the office
    slut, (Joe's GF), and in the Shop, Don, the 65-year old Luddite in
    QC, Marshal, kind of a general purpose shop guy, Jimmy, the machinist,
    and then sometimes Little Joe, Joe's son, comes in and does machinist,
    and sweepers and truck drivers kind of tend to come and go on an
    as-needed basis. I guess I'm also the IS guy, or whatever job title
    is handy for the computer guy. Anyway, Joe, Karen, Shaunna, and Don
    all have W2K boxes, I've got three - my old 6X86, the main Athlon,
    where I do CAD and text editing, and another Athlon I got off Ebay
    for about $250.00; and there's another computer in my office, which
    is running Slackware and is gateway for the rest of the computers,
    with a Samba share. The lusers don't know or care that "The Server"
    is running Slackware - "Server on 10.0.0.1" is just another folder
    in their "save as" dialog. (Yes, it's a raw IP - I'm still a System
    Admin newbie, and haven't grasped DNS yet).

    Well, they're refurbishing a used NC mill, and yesterday they asked
    me if my third computer is for sale. Duh. Everything's for sale. It's
    got W2K and Slack 9.1 loaded, and can dual-boot. Triple-boot, actually -
    I've got Slack set up two different ways.

    So I'll casually mention that little tidbit of info; probably set
    up KDE or Gnome on it - having seen Gnome a few times with
    Redmond^H^H^H^Hhat,
    and I'm pretty confident that it'll just take a few minutes to make
    it or KDE look enough like W2k that they won't care -

    And, of course, I'll report to the world what kind of reception it
    gets, if any at all. :)

    Cheers!
    Rich
    Rich Grise, Apr 17, 2004
    #17
  18. Lucas Tam

    Rich Grise Guest

    "imbsysop" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 08:44:03 -0500, Alex <> wrote:
    >
    > >Lucas Tam wrote:
    > >
    > >> With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > >> ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > >> more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    > >
    > >I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    > >Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer

    shops.
    > > Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the

    desktop,
    > >your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.

    > snip
    >
    > started Linux in early 1996 (RH4.0) and Linux was going to blow all
    > the rest out of the waters .. we're almost 10 years later now and
    > nothing has been blown out of the water yet on the contrary ..
    > if one checks the Linux registrations counter then & now .. hmmm well
    > .. although not very conclusive but I'm having a 63K+ number .. :)


    In the early 1970's, by when were we supposed to have manned bases on
    the moon and a viable Mars exploration program? And a space station
    where you could walk around in street clothes?

    We were also supposed to run out of food and oil by about today, I
    think.

    When I ask my Magic 8-ball "Will Linux drive Bill Gates out of business?"
    it says "Yes, Definitely." Interestingly, it also says "Yes, Definitely"
    sometimes when I ask it stuff like, "Will I get to pork Britney Spears
    up the butt?" So, I take fortune-tellers with a grain of salt. ;-)

    Cheers!
    Rich
    Rich Grise, Apr 17, 2004
    #18
  19. Lucas Tam

     @ .  Guest

    cyberoptiq <> says...

    >Well, the original question was "Will Linux eventually take over the
    >desktop market?". Probably not entirely but I would bet that soon
    >Linux will be neck and neck with the other's and just as good. IBM and
    >other's are selling server's with Linux installed so it's really just
    >a matter of time.


    Please don't crosspost to newsgroups that you don't read.
     @ . , Apr 17, 2004
    #19
  20. This is a photography news group.....

    SHUT THE HELL UP

    Linux rules, Windows sucks, Mac is great.

    END OF STORY !!!!!!


    On 17 Apr 2004 01:24:18 -0700
    (Pandora Xero) wrote:

    > Alex <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > > Lucas Tam wrote:
    > >
    > > > With economic powerhouses like the EU and China jumping on board to
    > > > ditch MS in favor of open source could Linux conceivably one day be
    > > > more ubiquitous than Windows? Would DRM be a factor?

    > >
    > > I sure hope so... It seems like every year you hear *this is the year of
    > > Linux*, but it's still on the back burner in many companies and computer shops.
    > > Until companies like Dell, HP, and IBM start advocating Linux on the desktop,
    > > your average computer user won't know anything about Linux.
    > >
    > > I have like 3 Linux bumper stickers on my car, and most folks think Linux is a
    > > band or something. Everyone, even non-computer users, know who Bill Gates is
    > > and what Windows is, but most have never even heard of Linux. Seriously! If
    > > the bigger computer vendors would start offering either Red Hat Enterprise WS or
    > > SuSE 9.1 (something with support for non-savvy folks) on HOME computers (not
    > > only corporate workstations and servers), this would definately give Linux the
    > > push it needs. Until then, I'm affraid Linux will never rise much higher then
    > > it is today.
    > >
    > > Take care,
    > >
    > > Alex.

    >
    > It's quite unfortunate, but you're right. Whilst HP and IBM do make
    > linux systems, they rarely advertise them, as they are business
    > workstations. I was talking computers at school, and some kid was
    > complaining about windoze, and said "...but what else is there, the
    > only other OS is MacOS" as if he's never even heard of linux. Another
    > person, a "friend" of mine, says "Microsoft must be doing something
    > right if everybody uses their OS." Of coures M$ is doing something
    > right, if your definition of right happens to include conniving
    > trickery, intellectual property theft, and bullying.
    >
    > I think that as soon as M$ goes down, Linux will finally get the
    > recognition it deserves. And with windoze's new "piracy-protection"
    > scheme, their downfall might not be too far off, perhaps five years or
    > so. but the question to ponder is not "Will Linux eventually take over
    > the desktop market?", but rather when it does, which distro will be
    > more dominant?
    >
    > I have used windoze since its "DOS GUI" days (3.1) and have only
    > recently stopped using it on my computer, after about four or five
    > months of phasing out. I have had a purely Linux system for only a
    > month or so, and have gone through about 5 distros to get to what i
    > now have. I am currently convinced that if any one Linux maker stands
    > will stand up to Micro$oft, it would be RedHat, because of their
    > setup, and because they have remained in the top three distros since i
    > first heard of them (on a Detroit, MI newscast sometime in '96).
    >
    > Case in Point: User-Friendliness
    > Micro$oft, ever since the "DOS GUI" days, has strived for a
    > user-friendly interface. This is one thing that Linux, by definition,
    > can never have. The prime goals of any linux distro are: 1.
    > Functionality and 2. Stability. Functionality comes at the cost of
    > user-friendliness, but doesn't necessarily have to coincide with
    > stability. the M$-DOS text interface, for example. prime example of
    > functionality, user-friendliness completely lacking, and stability,
    > umm... what stability? The problem is that user-friendliness and
    > functionality cannot coexist. Thus, people will settle for a
    > user-friendly OS that's easier to get used to. Then they will get tied
    > into it, and won't be able to see that the user-friendly OS is the
    > problem. (no offense to any overly religious people, but...) It's much
    > like any religion vs. atheism. Religion is an escape from harsh
    > reality, and atheism is the acceptance of reality. there are more
    > religious people in the world because it's easier to get used to. In
    > effect, the battle between Linux and Windoze is more of a war than a
    > battle, and a holy war at that.
    >
    > note: i support neither religion nor atheism, as they both have their
    > place
    > note: i support Linux, but Windoze has its place, too... in the trash
    > can (not the Recycle Bin, mind you)
    Rodrick Dalton, Apr 17, 2004
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Tony Spadaro

    Re: Digital bodies eventually reaching Film body prices?

    Tony Spadaro, Sep 4, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    513
    Tony Spadaro
    Sep 6, 2003
  2. DaVidaMundi

    Re: Digital bodies eventually reaching Film body prices?

    DaVidaMundi, Sep 5, 2003, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    338
    DaVidaMundi
    Sep 6, 2003
  3. Theo Markettos

    VOIP over VPN over TCP over WAP over 3G

    Theo Markettos, Feb 3, 2008, in forum: UK VOIP
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    787
    Theo Markettos
    Feb 14, 2008
  4. impossible
    Replies:
    22
    Views:
    819
    Chris Wilkinson
    Oct 18, 2008
  5. Simon Finnigan
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    497
    Simon Finnigan
    Mar 3, 2010
Loading...

Share This Page