wi fi

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Stephen, May 30, 2011.

  1. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a WI
    FI connected to the laptop

    TIA

    ste
    Stephen, May 30, 2011
    #1
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  2. Stephen

    Paul Guest

    Stephen wrote:
    > Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a WI
    > FI connected to the laptop
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > ste


    Not every retailer gives specifications. A lot of the
    pond scum, just give the model number of the laptop and
    a price, leaving the rest for you to figure out.

    If you go to the manufacturer's site, they will have specs,
    like 802.11 a/b/g or whatever.

    The various types of 802.11 are addressed here. Your
    other Wifi gear will also have support for the various
    flavors, and a subset is what all of them will use
    when networking together.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009

    "Even with protection, large discrepancies can exist between the throughput
    an 802.11n device can achieve in a greenfield network, compared to a
    mixed-mode network, when legacy devices are present. This is an extension
    of the 802.11b/802.11g coexistence problem."

    802.11n may promise high transfer rates, and after
    reading that article, you might try buying all "n"
    capable gear. But "n" is designed to be nice to
    the other flavors, and if it detects some of the
    other types (like, signals coming from a neighbor's house),
    it will reduce it's capabilities, so both of
    them can co-exist. If you lived in a rural location,
    with nobody else around, "n" would then be a bigger
    win.

    Paul
    Paul, May 30, 2011
    #2
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  3. "Stephen" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a
    > WI FI connected to the laptop
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > ste
    >


    What?
    Jeff Strickland, May 31, 2011
    #3
  4. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

    thank you that is really useful
    "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:is1389$pp0$...
    > Stephen wrote:
    >> Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a
    >> WI FI connected to the laptop
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> ste

    >
    > Not every retailer gives specifications. A lot of the
    > pond scum, just give the model number of the laptop and
    > a price, leaving the rest for you to figure out.
    >
    > If you go to the manufacturer's site, they will have specs,
    > like 802.11 a/b/g or whatever.
    >
    > The various types of 802.11 are addressed here. Your
    > other Wifi gear will also have support for the various
    > flavors, and a subset is what all of them will use
    > when networking together.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009
    >
    > "Even with protection, large discrepancies can exist between the
    > throughput
    > an 802.11n device can achieve in a greenfield network, compared to a
    > mixed-mode network, when legacy devices are present. This is an
    > extension
    > of the 802.11b/802.11g coexistence problem."
    >
    > 802.11n may promise high transfer rates, and after
    > reading that article, you might try buying all "n"
    > capable gear. But "n" is designed to be nice to
    > the other flavors, and if it detects some of the
    > other types (like, signals coming from a neighbor's house),
    > it will reduce it's capabilities, so both of
    > them can co-exist. If you lived in a rural location,
    > with nobody else around, "n" would then be a bigger
    > win.
    >
    > Paul
    Stephen, Jun 1, 2011
    #4
  5. "Paul" <> wrote in message
    news:is1389$pp0$...
    > Stephen wrote:
    >> Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a
    >> WI FI connected to the laptop
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> ste

    >
    > Not every retailer gives specifications. A lot of the
    > pond scum, just give the model number of the laptop and
    > a price, leaving the rest for you to figure out.
    >
    > If you go to the manufacturer's site, they will have specs,
    > like 802.11 a/b/g or whatever.
    >
    > The various types of 802.11 are addressed here. Your
    > other Wifi gear will also have support for the various
    > flavors, and a subset is what all of them will use
    > when networking together.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009
    >
    > "Even with protection, large discrepancies can exist between the
    > throughput
    > an 802.11n device can achieve in a greenfield network, compared to a
    > mixed-mode network, when legacy devices are present. This is an
    > extension
    > of the 802.11b/802.11g coexistence problem."
    >
    > 802.11n may promise high transfer rates, and after
    > reading that article, you might try buying all "n"
    > capable gear. But "n" is designed to be nice to
    > the other flavors, and if it detects some of the
    > other types (like, signals coming from a neighbor's house),
    > it will reduce it's capabilities, so both of
    > them can co-exist. If you lived in a rural location,
    > with nobody else around, "n" would then be a bigger
    > win.
    >
    > Paul


    That last paragraph is not entirely true.

    If an 802.11(n) adaptor is installed into a lesser environment, it will
    simply degrade itself to the highest capability of the router that it
    connects to. The neighbor's environment will have no effect, unless you log
    on through their stuff.

    If YOU have an 802.11(g) router, then your .11(n) adaptor will simply reduce
    its own speed to become compatible with the router. The distance that the
    (n) adaptor works is greater than a (g) adaptor in the same environment. I
    have an (n) adaptor in a computer that formerly had a (g) adaptor that could
    not see the router due to a variety of reasons. The point is, all of the
    reasons remain, yet the (n) adaptor works very well. If you have an (n)
    router and an (n) adaptor, then the router and adaptor will connect at the
    optimum speed that the environment can support. If you have a (g) router and
    an (n) adaptor, or vice versa, the router and adaptor will still connect at
    the optimum speed for the environment, but that will be defined by the lower
    spec of (g) or (n).

    There is no downside to having an 802.11(n) wireless adaptor. It will play
    as fast as the router that it is connected to, and it will play with greater
    reliability than an adaptor of a lesser spec being used in the same place.
    The (n) adaptor does not care about anything else except the router it is
    connected to.
    Jeff Strickland, Jun 1, 2011
    #5
  6. Stephen

    Paul Guest

    Jeff Strickland wrote:
    > "Paul" <> wrote in message
    > news:is1389$pp0$...
    >> Stephen wrote:
    >>> Been looking at laptops and looking at 3 gb, but how do I know its got a
    >>> WI FI connected to the laptop
    >>>
    >>> TIA
    >>>
    >>> ste

    >> Not every retailer gives specifications. A lot of the
    >> pond scum, just give the model number of the laptop and
    >> a price, leaving the rest for you to figure out.
    >>
    >> If you go to the manufacturer's site, they will have specs,
    >> like 802.11 a/b/g or whatever.
    >>
    >> The various types of 802.11 are addressed here. Your
    >> other Wifi gear will also have support for the various
    >> flavors, and a subset is what all of them will use
    >> when networking together.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/802.11
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n-2009
    >>
    >> "Even with protection, large discrepancies can exist between the
    >> throughput
    >> an 802.11n device can achieve in a greenfield network, compared to a
    >> mixed-mode network, when legacy devices are present. This is an
    >> extension
    >> of the 802.11b/802.11g coexistence problem."
    >>
    >> 802.11n may promise high transfer rates, and after
    >> reading that article, you might try buying all "n"
    >> capable gear. But "n" is designed to be nice to
    >> the other flavors, and if it detects some of the
    >> other types (like, signals coming from a neighbor's house),
    >> it will reduce it's capabilities, so both of
    >> them can co-exist. If you lived in a rural location,
    >> with nobody else around, "n" would then be a bigger
    >> win.
    >>
    >> Paul

    >
    > That last paragraph is not entirely true.
    >
    > If an 802.11(n) adaptor is installed into a lesser environment, it will
    > simply degrade itself to the highest capability of the router that it
    > connects to. The neighbor's environment will have no effect, unless you log
    > on through their stuff.
    >
    > If YOU have an 802.11(g) router, then your .11(n) adaptor will simply reduce
    > its own speed to become compatible with the router. The distance that the
    > (n) adaptor works is greater than a (g) adaptor in the same environment. I
    > have an (n) adaptor in a computer that formerly had a (g) adaptor that could
    > not see the router due to a variety of reasons. The point is, all of the
    > reasons remain, yet the (n) adaptor works very well. If you have an (n)
    > router and an (n) adaptor, then the router and adaptor will connect at the
    > optimum speed that the environment can support. If you have a (g) router and
    > an (n) adaptor, or vice versa, the router and adaptor will still connect at
    > the optimum speed for the environment, but that will be defined by the lower
    > spec of (g) or (n).
    >
    > There is no downside to having an 802.11(n) wireless adaptor. It will play
    > as fast as the router that it is connected to, and it will play with greater
    > reliability than an adaptor of a lesser spec being used in the same place.
    > The (n) adaptor does not care about anything else except the router it is
    > connected to.


    It's above my pay scale to adjust...

    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-basics/30664-5-ways-to-fix-slow-80211n-speed

    Paul
    Paul, Jun 1, 2011
    #6
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