Why would I want to turn IS off?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by sw2u, Sep 23, 2007.

  1. sw2u

    sw2u Guest

    My Canon A570 IS has a menu option to turn image stabilization off. Is
    there some tradeoff or downside to just leaving it on all the time?

    Is there some circumstance where it's best to turn IS off?


    --
    sw2U
     
    sw2u, Sep 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. sw2u

    cmyk Guest

    Apart from battery drain, you probably shouldn't use IS when the camera is in a fixed position on a tripod or something similar -
    with some cameras (not necessarily your's) it might actually blur the photos.

    Cheers
    --
    cmyk
    "sw2u" <> wrote in message news:...
    > My Canon A570 IS has a menu option to turn image stabilization off. Is
    > there some tradeoff or downside to just leaving it on all the time?
    >
    > Is there some circumstance where it's best to turn IS off?
    >
    >
    > --
    > sw2U
     
    cmyk, Sep 23, 2007
    #2
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  3. sw2u

    T. Randal Guest

    On Sun, 23 Sep 2007 02:37:25 GMT, sw2u <> wrote:

    >My Canon A570 IS has a menu option to turn image stabilization off. Is
    >there some tradeoff or downside to just leaving it on all the time?
    >
    >Is there some circumstance where it's best to turn IS off?


    It will depend on your camera. Most of the newer ones automatically turn off IS
    when on a tripod. Dampening down its function within 2 seconds of no motion
    detected. The nice part of not turning this kind of IS off, if the tripod is
    subjected to small vibrations or a breeze it will automatically kick-in and
    correct for it. Mine behaves this way, but it's not an A570 IS so I don't know
    how yours behaves.

    Some cameras don't automatically dampen the IS when the camera is still. It is
    always searching for and trying to find motion to dampen. Moving your image
    around even when it's locked steady on a tripod.

    You'll have to test your camera to see if the image moves when on a steady
    tripod. If it does then turn it off for that use. Some just feel better turning
    it off when on a tripod.

    To test it mount it on a tripod with IS turned on. Then zoom in on some distant
    high-contrast detailed image. Use full digital-zoom too so that you can see in
    the viewfinder down to almost pixel level. Wait about 2-5 seconds for the IS
    action to dampen down. Try to not even shift your weight on the floor by the
    tripod because even this might be enough to shift the tripod+camera to make the
    IS try to correct for it. If you don't see the image move the distance of even
    one pixel for 30 seconds then it automatically turns itself off. That's the good
    kind. Many base their experience of always turning it off when on a tripod from
    outdated or poorly implemented versions of IS that didn't do this.

    When a camera is solidly attached to other optical instruments like microscopes
    and telescopes then IS becomes useless too. That's another instance where
    turning it off might be helpful, just to save on battery life if for no other
    reason.
     
    T. Randal, Sep 23, 2007
    #3
  4. sw2u

    C J Campbell Guest

    On 2007-09-22 19:37:25 -0700, sw2u <> said:

    > My Canon A570 IS has a menu option to turn image stabilization off. Is
    > there some tradeoff or downside to just leaving it on all the time?
    >
    > Is there some circumstance where it's best to turn IS off?


    The image stabilization on the A570 IS does not turn itself off when
    the camera is on a tripod. The optical stabilization can continue to
    hunt around when the camera is on a tripod and actually blur your
    picture. At the very least, it drains the battery. So turn it off when
    the camera is on a tripod or sturdy support.

    Also, the IS has very little effect when shooting wide angle or close
    focusing distances. You can turn it off then, too, to save battery
    power.

    I think this is a very nice camera for the money.
    --
    Waddling Eagle
    World Famous Flight Instructor
     
    C J Campbell, Sep 23, 2007
    #4
  5. sw2u

    sw2u Guest

    On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 20:43:01 -0700, C J Campbell
    <> wrote:

    >On 2007-09-22 19:37:25 -0700, sw2u <> said:
    >
    >> My Canon A570 IS has a menu option to turn image stabilization off. Is
    >> there some tradeoff or downside to just leaving it on all the time?
    >>
    >> Is there some circumstance where it's best to turn IS off?

    >
    >The image stabilization on the A570 IS does not turn itself off when
    >the camera is on a tripod. The optical stabilization can continue to
    >hunt around when the camera is on a tripod and actually blur your
    >picture. At the very least, it drains the battery. So turn it off when
    >the camera is on a tripod or sturdy support.
    >
    >Also, the IS has very little effect when shooting wide angle or close
    >focusing distances. You can turn it off then, too, to save battery
    >power.
    >
    >I think this is a very nice camera for the money.



    Excellent info. Thanks to you and to all who replied.

    I haven't given it a real workout yet, but so far I'm very pleased
    with the A570 IS. BTW, I have a strong suspicion it has the same
    internal mechanism as the more-expensive A710 IS.

    --
    sw2U
     
    sw2u, Sep 23, 2007
    #5
  6. sw2u

    Ron Hunter Guest

    cmyk wrote:
    > Apart from battery drain, you probably shouldn't use IS when the camera
    > is in a fixed position on a tripod or something similar - with some
    > cameras (not necessarily your's) it might actually blur the photos.
    >
    > Cheers


    In some cases, if you intend to pan up, or down, the camera may not be
    able to make a good picture with IS on. It may try to correct for the
    motion, rendering your subject blurred.
     
    Ron Hunter, Sep 23, 2007
    #6
  7. sw2u

    Eddie Flanks Guest

    On Sun, Ron Hunter wrote:

    >cmyk wrote:
    >> Apart from battery drain, you probably shouldn't use IS when the camera
    >> is in a fixed position on a tripod or something similar - with some
    >> cameras (not necessarily your's) it might actually blur the photos.
    >>
    >> Cheers

    >
    >In some cases, if you intend to pan up, or down, the camera may not be
    >able to make a good picture with IS on. It may try to correct for the
    >motion, rendering your subject blurred.


    I guess your camera or lenses only have horizontal IS. Most all P&S IS cameras
    have both options. Setting it for horizontal-only for panning sideways.
     
    Eddie Flanks, Sep 23, 2007
    #7
  8. In article <>,
    says...
    > On Sun, Ron Hunter wrote:
    >
    > >cmyk wrote:
    > >> Apart from battery drain, you probably shouldn't use IS when the camera
    > >> is in a fixed position on a tripod or something similar - with some
    > >> cameras (not necessarily your's) it might actually blur the photos.
    > >>
    > >> Cheers

    > >
    > >In some cases, if you intend to pan up, or down, the camera may not be
    > >able to make a good picture with IS on. It may try to correct for the
    > >motion, rendering your subject blurred.

    >
    > I guess your camera or lenses only have horizontal IS. Most all P&S IS cameras
    > have both options. Setting it for horizontal-only for panning sideways.
    >
    >

    Wouldn't you want to set it for vertical only if panning sideways? And
    who has the option anyway?
     
    Irwin Peckinloomer, Sep 24, 2007
    #8
  9. sw2u

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Eddie Flanks wrote:
    > On Sun, Ron Hunter wrote:
    >
    >> cmyk wrote:
    >>> Apart from battery drain, you probably shouldn't use IS when the camera
    >>> is in a fixed position on a tripod or something similar - with some
    >>> cameras (not necessarily your's) it might actually blur the photos.
    >>>
    >>> Cheers

    >> In some cases, if you intend to pan up, or down, the camera may not be
    >> able to make a good picture with IS on. It may try to correct for the
    >> motion, rendering your subject blurred.

    >
    > I guess your camera or lenses only have horizontal IS. Most all P&S IS cameras
    > have both options. Setting it for horizontal-only for panning sideways.
    >


    The point is that panning is something that might require you to disable IS.
     
    Ron Hunter, Sep 24, 2007
    #9
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