Why No One Wins in the High-Def Format War

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Ablang, Oct 14, 2007.

  1. Ablang

    Ablang Guest

    Why No One Wins in the High-Def Format War
    What does Paramount's defection to HD DVD mean for consumers? Nothing
    good.
    Melissa J. Perenson, PC World
    Wednesday, September 19, 2007 1:00 AM PDT

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,137267/article.html?tk=nl_texcol



    The ongoing tussle between backers of the two high-definition media
    formats--Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD--took a dramatic turn with the news
    that Paramount would release all future titles on HD DVD only. The
    studio's statement last month set off a spate of announcements from
    other parties as members of each camp tried to rally the troops and
    stake out their positions heading into the holiday season.

    The news couldn't come at a worse time, what with consumers revving up
    to make a buying choice this holiday season--assuming they're ready to
    jump into the high-def fray at all. Suddenly, what had been a fairly
    clear advantage for Blu-ray became much more uncertain. And that's
    actually not a good thing for either fledgling format.

    Before Paramount's announcement, Blu-ray appeared to have an enviable
    edge: Two Blu-ray discs were being sold for every HD-DVD disc, and the
    format's studio backing was wider than HD DVD's. For a while, more--
    and cooler--titles seemed to be coming out on Blu-ray (Pirates of the
    Caribbean, anyone?) than on HD DVD. Even retailers appeared to be
    voting for Blu-ray, with Blockbuster saying that it would stock HD DVD
    in only 250 out of 1700 stores slated to carry high-def titles (all
    will have Blu-ray), and with Target declaring that it would promote
    Blu-ray players in its stores.
    The Paramount Decision

    The Paramount announcement caught the Blu-ray Disc Association and its
    members off-guard. Even Andy Parsons, who heads the BDA's promotional
    efforts in the United States, expressed surprise at Paramount's move.
    Like many observers (myself included), Parsons would have understood
    if Paramount had taken the step earlier this year, before Nielsen
    sales data began showing stronger support for Blu-ray than HD DVD. But
    now?

    Paramount CTO Alan Bell made some valid points, though, in explaining
    the reasons behind Paramount's decision. Many of the reasons he cited
    were technical ones; he didn't get into the business side too much,
    leaving that for other studio spokespeople. While I don't for a minute
    believe that the decision was wholly based on technical reasons, I do
    believe that Bell is right on one specific point: the Blu-ray specs
    mess.

    Right now the Blu-ray Disc format is in transition, as new minimum
    requirements will go into effect come October 31. All players will
    need to support up to 256MB of storage and secondary audio and video
    decoding (which enables features such as picture-in-picture content).
    Additionally, players supporting BD Live--the much-touted Internet-
    connected interactivity that the Blu-ray Disc specification calls for--
    must have 1GB of storage and an ethernet connection as well as the
    secondary audio and video decoding.

    The brewing confusion lies in the fact that the latest Blu-ray Disc
    players don't have those features; furthermore, it's unclear as to
    whether the manufacturers of the players announced at the giant CEDIA
    home-theater trade show earlier this month (LG, Pioneer, Samsung, and
    Sharp) will be able to offer firmware upgrades to those models to
    enable what's being referred to as the Blu-ray 1.1 profile (which
    encompasses all of the new specs that go into effect October 31).

    I have no doubt that these new Blu-ray players, like the ones that
    have preceded them, will play all movies and TV shows in gorgeous high-
    def. But the players you can buy this holiday season most likely won't
    be able to deliver the full Blu-ray entertainment experience as movie
    discs ship with new interactive features. Next year, and the year
    after next, greater features and interactivity will be coming,
    assuming Blu-ray persists as an entertainment format. Do you really
    want to have to buy yet another player just to handle the cool, extra
    disc-playback features you read about in a review?

    Following so far? If so, you're doing better than most folks I
    describe this situation to. And you're probably ahead of the masses of
    consumers who will converge on Best Buy and other retailers this
    holiday season.

    No wonder, then, that the player specs might be an issue for a movie
    studio. How can studios author content without knowing the
    capabilities of the player? How can they market the extras, knowing
    that the early adopters who bought a player in the last two years
    probably won't be able to view that content? This is a huge marketing
    and educational hurdle that the Blu-ray camp must face as new players
    and new features start to appear. In this respect, HD DVD holds an
    advantage over Blu-ray: From day one, every HD DVD player has been
    able to handle the same level of interactivity. As time goes on, that
    could prove a winning strength of HD DVD.
    Any Winners in the Room?

    Maybe saying that no one wins here is too strong a statement.
    Certainly, the Paramount announcement is a clear coup for the DVD
    Forum and the backers of HD DVD (led by Toshiba, Microsoft, and NBC
    Universal Studios). Aside from Toshiba's price drops in the spring and
    summer, HD DVD had really had no momentum going. The Paramount
    announcement reinvigorated the HD DVD movement.

    Assuming the rumors of a $150 million payoff are true, Paramount is
    likely the only other party that doesn't lose. Although Paramount's
    Bell told me that the studio's HD DVD exclusivity deal doesn't have a
    timeline attached to it, I've heard through the grapevine that the
    agreement may be limited to just two years. If so, my guess is that
    the payoff--whatever form it took (reports say that it wasn't a cash
    payment, but Paramount is officially mum on the terms of this
    arrangement)--more than offsets any of Paramount's potential losses
    from not having its movies and TV shows available in both HD DVD and
    Blu-ray.

    Sure, consumers will get angry, but in the long run, if Star Trek fans
    buy Paramount-produced Star Trek titles on HD DVD, and if they
    ultimately need to buy them again in Blu-ray because Blu-ray becomes
    the industry's format of choice in the future, then they're going to
    end up buying the titles again. End of story.

    Toshiba will likely see some uptick in player sales thanks to
    Paramount. And because the company's players are relatively
    inexpensive (the new HD-A3, due out in October, will retail for $300),
    it won't surprise me if some consumers end up opting for HD DVD just
    because they can afford it.

    The Consumer Quandary

    Meanwhile, consumers remain caught in the middle. Forget the specs
    battle for a moment. Take away all the minutiae that the average
    consumer doesn't want to bother with (and, frankly, shouldn't be
    bothered with). Why buy a Blu-ray player today when you know something
    better (Profile 1.1) is coming along? The answer is, of course, that
    you want to see Blu-ray content today, not tomorrow or (more likely)
    next year or even further into the future.

    As more and more high-def TVs enter homes, consumers clearly will want
    high-def content to play. If all you care about is picture quality,
    and you want the movies coming out on Blu-ray, you'll want to buy a
    player this holiday season. But you'll be buying a piece of equipment
    that will be almost instantly obsolete.

    Ultimately, which format you'll buy will depend on the movies you
    want. You may never have noticed which studio produced (or
    distributed) your favorite films and TV shows, but given the current
    state of affairs, now you'll have to. Paramount and Universal are
    exclusively HD DVD; Disney, Fox, Lionsgate, MGM, and Sony are
    exclusively Blu-ray. Warner Bros. is format agnostic, and says it
    plans to continue offering its content in both formats (though the
    rumor mill is saying that both HD DVD and Blu-ray backers are actively
    courting Warner to go exclusive to one format).
    What Should a Buyer Do?

    You could solve the problem by opting for a dual-format player such as
    the upcoming LG BH200 or the Samsung BD-UP5000. Even though neither
    model, as it is, supports the Blu-ray Profile 1.1 spec, they both can,
    at least, play Blu-ray and HD DVD titles. That alone is a boon for
    consumers faced with choosing between the two formats. But you'll be
    paying a hefty premium for such convenience: For the price of one of
    these devices, you could buy a pair of stand-alone players, one in
    each format. That's a sad commentary on the state of these
    technologies and this format war, if you ask me.

    Many in the industry seem to think that this holiday season will be a
    decisive moment in the format war, and I have to agree. The format
    that enjoys more traction in hardware and software sales during this
    season will be the one that has momentum going into next year and
    beyond. This year has been the grace period for the two formats to
    work out the kinks, get their acts together. Analysts have been
    predicting that 2008 will be the year Blu-ray and HD DVD expand into
    the mainstream, as prices fall and the production of discs and players
    increases.

    But for 2008 to be a year of growth, consumers will need to feel a
    modicum of confidence about the format they're buying. Or, they'll
    need to resign themselves to the possibility that whatever they buy
    may become obsolete fairly soon--but at least they'll have some
    immediate gratification.

    I recommend skipping this holiday buying season entirely. Neither
    format feels mature enough for anyone but gamblers willing to risk
    buying a player and media that might not be around a decade from now:
    Blu-ray's specs are in transition, and HD DVD just doesn't have wide
    enough studio support, even with Paramount on board. HD DVD needs at
    least two more studios to tip the scales fully in its favor.

    Blu-ray will be ready for the masses once the next generation of
    players hits sometime in 2008. But regardless of which format you go
    with, if you're patient and wait another six to eight months before
    buying a player, you'll likely be rewarded twofold: first, by saving
    bucks on your hardware purchase, and second, by having more confidence
    in whichever format you end up buying.

    If I were a betting person--and assuming the status quo, with no other
    business deals cropping up to sway a studio from its current
    allegiance--I'd still lean toward Blu-ray as the winner in the long
    haul, in large part because of the studio support it carries. But the
    Paramount deal makes that call less clear-cut, and confuses matters
    for the time being.
     
    Ablang, Oct 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. Ablang

    Winfield Guest

    Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher or
    stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker? Meh.

    Big WOOP and pile of Kung-Fu.

    HD-VMD and Chinese HD are in the works. These horses have some really
    long odds against even leaving the starting gate, but a case can be made
    that hi-def DVD will become even more of a mess than it is right now.

    The current winner, and still champion is standard DVD! Folks must
    tweak panels, upconvert and scale these lovely, standard rainbow_esque
    discs!

    Patience grasshoppers. All good things come to those who wait. And
    start watching FEWER movies to get more enjoyment out of your worthless
    life. Read a book. Fly a kite. Cut back on the entertainment
    addiction. :~P

    Yar-rb, W.



    Ablang wrote:
    > Why No One Wins in the High-Def Format War
    > What does Paramount's defection to HD DVD mean for consumers? Nothing
    > good.
    > Melissa J. Perenson, PC World
    > Wednesday, September 19, 2007 1:00 AM PDT
    >
    > http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,137267/article.html?tk=nl_texcol
     
    Winfield, Oct 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Ablang

    Richard C. Guest

    "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    > BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher or
    > stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker? Meh.
    >
    > Big WOOP and pile of Kung-Fu.
    >

    ==================================

    Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!

    They were wrong.
    Prices came WAY down once DivX died!
     
    Richard C., Oct 14, 2007
    #3
  4. Richard C. wrote:

    > "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    >> BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher
    >> or stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker?

    >
    > Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >
    > They were wrong.
    > Prices came WAY down once DivX died!


    Because companies who made the parts and the disks no longer had to
    worry about which horse to back, and could mass-produce one standard of
    products on a larger scale, thereby making the assemblies cheaper and
    easier to adopt...
    Life After Wartime. :)

    Derek Janssen
     
    Derek Janssen, Oct 14, 2007
    #4
  5. Ablang

    WinField Guest

    Richard C. wrote:
    > "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    >> BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher
    >> or stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker?
    >> Meh.
    >>
    >> Big WOOP and pile of Kung-Fu.
    >>

    > ==================================
    >
    > Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >
    > They were wrong.
    > Prices came WAY down once DivX died!



    So Blu-Ray is the winner. At what price point would you buy that spiffy
    new BD-DVD player? And ... how long will it take to get to your price
    point? Remember, as of today - Blu_Ray!

    Nips, winfield
     
    WinField, Oct 14, 2007
    #5
  6. Ablang

    WinField Guest

    Derek Janssen wrote:
    > Richard C. wrote:
    >
    >> "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    >>> BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher
    >>> or stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker?

    >>
    >>
    >> Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >>
    >> They were wrong.
    >> Prices came WAY down once DivX died!

    >
    >
    > Because companies who made the parts and the disks no longer had to
    > worry about which horse to back, and could mass-produce one standard of
    > products on a larger scale, thereby making the assemblies cheaper and
    > easier to adopt...
    > Life After Wartime. :)
    >
    > Derek Janssen
    >



    Have you purchased your BD player yet, Derek? If not, at what price
    point would you jump in? How long before Sony meets you on your terms?

    thanks,
    winfield
     
    WinField, Oct 14, 2007
    #6
  7. In article <F0tQi.429$>,
    WinField <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >Richard C. wrote:
    >> "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    >>> BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher
    >>> or stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker?
    >>> Meh.
    >>>
    >>> Big WOOP and pile of Kung-Fu.
    >>>

    >> ==================================
    >>
    >> Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >>
    >> They were wrong.
    >> Prices came WAY down once DivX died!

    >
    >
    >So Blu-Ray is the winner. At what price point would you buy that spiffy
    >new BD-DVD player? And ... how long will it take to get to your price
    >point? Remember, as of today - Blu_Ray!
    >
    > Nips, winfield


    At Costco this week the HD-DVD players were about $250 and the
    Sony Blu-Ray players in the $450 neighborhood. I've forgotten the
    exact price as I'm not ready to buy yet - but prices indeed have
    come down.

    Bill

    --
    Bill Vermillion - bv @ wjv . com
     
    Bill Vermillion, Oct 14, 2007
    #7
  8. WinField wrote:

    >>>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases
    >>>> are BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go
    >>>> higher or stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear
    >>>> sooner/quicker?
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >>>
    >>> They were wrong.
    >>> Prices came WAY down once DivX died!

    >>
    >> Because companies who made the parts and the disks no longer had to
    >> worry about which horse to back, and could mass-produce one standard
    >> of products on a larger scale, thereby making the assemblies cheaper
    >> and easier to adopt...
    >> Life After Wartime.

    >
    > Have you purchased your BD player yet, Derek? If not, at what price
    > point would you jump in?


    Well, having given up on Samsung, and not getting a straight answer from
    Sharp or LG, I'm keeping a 1.1 eye on a firmware-loaded $500 PS3 as soon
    as the Nov./Christmas/Jan. sales start throwing Best Buy coupons at us...

    The deciding factors?
    1) Update adaptaility (at least through '09)
    2) Minor features missing from other players (eg. Wide vs. 4:3 switch
    over HDMI)
    and
    3) Kingdom Hearts on PS2. :D

    Derek Janssen (not necessarily in that order)
     
    Derek Janssen, Oct 14, 2007
    #8
  9. Ablang

    Tarkus Guest

    Winfield wrote:
    > Patience grasshoppers. All good things come to those who wait. And
    > start watching FEWER movies to get more enjoyment out of your worthless
    > life. Read a book. Fly a kite. Cut back on the entertainment
    > addiction. :~P


    I'm cutting back on my entertainment addiction by not reading and not
    flying kites.
     
    Tarkus, Oct 15, 2007
    #9
  10. Ablang

    Tarkus Guest

    Bill Vermillion wrote:
    > At Costco this week the HD-DVD players were about $250 and the
    > Sony Blu-Ray players in the $450 neighborhood. I've forgotten the
    > exact price as I'm not ready to buy yet - but prices indeed have
    > come down.


    Don't forget the 5 free discs you get with Blu-ray. That's like an
    additional $125-150 off, assuming there are five titles available that
    you would have eventually bought.

    HD-DVD had/has similar promotions.
     
    Tarkus, Oct 15, 2007
    #10
  11. Ablang

    Sean Black Guest

    In article <>,
    Ablang <> writes
    >
    >Sure, consumers will get angry, but in the long run, if Star Trek fans
    >buy Paramount-produced Star Trek titles on HD DVD, and if they
    >ultimately need to buy them again in Blu-ray because Blu-ray becomes
    >the industry's format of choice in the future, then they're going to
    >end up buying the titles again. End of story.
    >

    If people have already bought them on HD DVD, and let's face it, they
    aren't cheap, I can't see why they're going to have to buy them again on
    Blu Ray (also not cheap). Are their HD DVDs going to stop playing all of
    a sudden on their HD DVD players, if Blu Ray wins?
    --
    Sean Black
     
    Sean Black, Oct 15, 2007
    #11
  12. Ablang

    Richard C. Guest

    "WinField" <> wrote in message
    news:F0tQi.429$...
    >
    >
    > Richard C. wrote:
    >> "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases are
    >>> BLUE. Will prices come down? No. The prices may actually go higher or
    >>> stay the same longer. Will BD profile 1.1 appear sooner/quicker? Meh.
    >>>
    >>> Big WOOP and pile of Kung-Fu.
    >>>

    >> ==================================
    >>
    >> Sounds like the same thing people were saying in the DVD/DivX wars!
    >>
    >> They were wrong.
    >> Prices came WAY down once DivX died!

    >
    >
    > So Blu-Ray is the winner. At what price point would you buy that spiffy
    > new BD-DVD player? And ... how long will it take to get to your price
    > point? Remember, as of today - Blu_Ray!
    >
    > Nips, winfield


    ==========================
    How did you make THAT giant leap?

    HD-DVD players are cheapest at present.
    The discs are still way too expensive.
     
    Richard C., Oct 15, 2007
    #12
  13. In message news:, Winfield
    sprach forth the following:

    > HD-VMD and Chinese HD are in the works.


    I take it the Chinese uses discs made of lead?
     
    Fred Garvin, Male Prostitute, Oct 15, 2007
    #13
  14. Ablang

    Winfield Guest

    Richard C. wrote:
    > "WinField" <> wrote in message
    > news:F0tQi.429$...
    >>
    >>
    >> Richard C. wrote:
    >>> "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases
    >>>> are BLUE. {snippage ...}


    ^^ IMAGINE ^^ er... pretend, let's assume for the sake of argument,
    because some enthusiasts are lamenting the format war.


    >> So Blu-Ray is the winner. At what price point would you buy that
    >> spiffy new BD-DVD player? And ... how long will it take to get to
    >> your price point? Remember, as of today - Blu_Ray!
    >>
    >> Nips, winfield

    >
    > ==========================
    > How did you make THAT giant leap?
    >
    > HD-DVD players are cheapest at present.
    > The discs are still way too expensive.


    I believe both formats will be around until Roy L. Fuchs washes his
    filthy mouth out with SOAP. I have no idea how the market mix of studio
    support, PC backup blank-disc or novelty yard-sale items will wash out.

    If HD-DVD comes on strong, Sony's Blu-Ray could become the "Apple
    Computer" of DVD playback. Snob appeal, high prices and "I'm too sexy
    for my shirt" image. It's anyone's guess.

    - winf
     
    Winfield, Oct 15, 2007
    #14
  15. Ablang

    Winfield Guest

    Fred Garvin, Male Prostitute wrote:
    > In message news:, Winfield
    > sprach forth the following:
    >
    >> HD-VMD and Chinese HD are in the works.

    >
    > I take it the Chinese uses discs made of lead?



    Lol. If the format tanks, you can wallpaper your office with these
    discs to protect against radiation and gamma rays.

    - Winfield
     
    Winfield, Oct 15, 2007
    #15
  16. On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 07:55:02 -0700, Winfield <>
    wrote:

    >Richard C. wrote:
    >> "WinField" <> wrote in message
    >> news:F0tQi.429$...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Richard C. wrote:
    >>>> "Winfield" <> wrote in message
    >>>> news:...
    >>>>
    >>>>> Imagine that Blu-Ray wins tomorrow - all new H-Def movie releases
    >>>>> are BLUE. {snippage ...}

    >
    > ^^ IMAGINE ^^ er... pretend, let's assume for the sake of argument,
    >because some enthusiasts are lamenting the format war.
    >
    >
    >>> So Blu-Ray is the winner. At what price point would you buy that
    >>> spiffy new BD-DVD player? And ... how long will it take to get to
    >>> your price point? Remember, as of today - Blu_Ray!
    >>>
    >>> Nips, winfield

    >>
    >> ==========================
    >> How did you make THAT giant leap?
    >>
    >> HD-DVD players are cheapest at present.
    >> The discs are still way too expensive.

    >
    >I believe both formats will be around until Roy L. Fuchs washes his
    >filthy mouth out with SOAP. I have no idea how the market mix of studio
    >support, PC backup blank-disc or novelty yard-sale items will wash out.
    >
    >If HD-DVD comes on strong, Sony's Blu-Ray could become the "Apple
    >Computer" of DVD playback. Snob appeal, high prices and "I'm too sexy
    >for my shirt" image. It's anyone's guess.
    >
    > - winf


    Like I said, asswipe! They will BOTH be around for a LONG TIME!

    You sumbitch!
     
    Herbert John \Jackie\ Gleason, Oct 16, 2007
    #16
  17. Ablang

    Doug Jacobs Guest

    Interesting article, but didn't hit the points I was looking for.

    Why no one wins in the high-def format war:
    * Current players are "broken" as they can't play all movies. Why should
    consumers have to choose which studios they want to watch? And buying 2
    separate players that do the same thing, only in an incompatible way, is
    equally stupid.

    * More likely than not, we'll see hybrid or combo players before too
    long. While this solves the consumer's conndrum of choosing between, say,
    Transformers and Pirates, it basically turns the HD video market into the
    same mess that is today's burnable DVD market.

    The article also doesn't seem to raise enough ire against the stupidity of
    messing with standards. If I'd bought a blu-ray player, only to find out
    that later discs wouldn't play on it, I'd be mighty pissed. I shouldn't
    have to worry about my appliances' upgrade paths. I deal with updates and
    upgrades enough in the computer world. As a consumer appliance, I want it
    to work. Always work. No ifs, ands, or "go burn the update to a disc and
    upgrade your device" about it! Does this sound unreasonable? I mean, can
    you imagine if you had to upgrade your oven because this year's turkey
    dinner has some new features that are incompatible with older ovens?

    Sure, you could argue that this is what being an early adopter is all
    about - but think about this - if blu-ray is still in its early adopter
    phase, why are they even trying to sell to folks at Walmart? Sure, sales
    mean superiority, but getting 1000s of angry support calls on Christmas
    day isn't going to help anyone in the long run. I'm sure most of us here
    have the experience of working as the extended family's tech support
    person for computers. Now imagine having to explain why their movie
    player needs an upgrade like their computer. Much less, how to find,
    download, and burn the upgrade to a disc for their player to use... Oh
    yeah, that sounds like a great way to spend an afternoon to me.

    At the rate this "war" is going, there's a good chance that the blu-ray
    and HD-DVD will just become the next laserdisc, or even DVD-audio/SACD.
    The majority of the market will continue on with DVD, until something
    clearly better and easier to deal with comes along.

    --
    It's not broken. It's...advanced.
     
    Doug Jacobs, Oct 16, 2007
    #17
  18. Ablang

    Tarkus Guest

    Doug Jacobs wrote:
    >
    > * More likely than not, we'll see hybrid or combo players before too
    > long. While this solves the consumer's conndrum of choosing between, say,
    > Transformers and Pirates, it basically turns the HD video market into the
    > same mess that is today's burnable DVD market.


    What's so messy about today's burnable DVD market?
     
    Tarkus, Oct 16, 2007
    #18
  19. Ablang

    Mark Jones Guest

    Doug Jacobs wrote:
    > Sure, you could argue that this is what being an early adopter is all
    > about - but think about this - if blu-ray is still in its early
    > adopter phase, why are they even trying to sell to folks at Walmart?
    > Sure, sales mean superiority, but getting 1000s of angry support
    > calls on Christmas day isn't going to help anyone in the long run.
    > I'm sure most of us here have the experience of working as the
    > extended family's tech support person for computers. Now imagine
    > having to explain why their movie player needs an upgrade like their
    > computer. Much less, how to find, download, and burn the upgrade to
    > a disc for their player to use... Oh yeah, that sounds like a great
    > way to spend an afternoon to me.


    I consider Blu-ray to be at an early beta test stage and something
    that hit the market before it was ready. This is a consumer device
    and shouldn't need upgrades like a computer. I might get one when
    they quit screwing around and actually finish the development process.
     
    Mark Jones, Oct 16, 2007
    #19
  20. Ablang

    Winfield Guest

    Thank Ewe for applying at *Blew-Ray Blue Balls* consortium. It is a
    great honor to be exposed to the likes of yourself.

    That picture of you -- flaunting your man-breasts on Hollywood Boulevard
    almost clinched it. However, we are sorry to say that donkey-wiping
    talent just isn't in vogue this calendar decade.

    Thank you for your Sincere Groveling,
    BrBB (Chairman of the Bored)

    Roy L. Fuchs



    Herbert John "Jackie" Gleason wrote:

    > Like I said, asswipe! They will BOTH be around for a LONG TIME!
    >
    > You sumbitch!
     
    Winfield, Oct 16, 2007
    #20
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