Why Massachusetts specifies open document as one standard.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by thingy, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. thingy

    thingy Guest

    The battle here is how information is stored and hence retrieved, not
    how it is written. A document can be written using any proprietry
    software the author or company chooses, as long as it is saved in open
    format.

    =============

    "By the way, some news articles and other various groups explained the
    issue very poorly, suggesting that this decision was fundamentally about
    "using open source software instead of Microsoft Office" or "throwing
    away Microsoft Office."

    ==============
    (not true, as we shall see, please read on or better follow the link)
    ==============

    In this introduction, Microsoft correctly identifies the real issue:
    data formats. There's nothing in this Massachusetts decision that
    mandates or even prefers open source software. This decision does not
    even mandate that Massachusetts stop using Microsoft Office,
    necessarily, though that decision is partly Microsoft's.

    (so it is up to Microsoft)

    If Microsoft implements Massachusetts' key requirement (OpenDocument),
    then great; if not, that is a future possibility. Data formats may seem
    like an esoteric thing to debate about, but whoever controls the data
    format controls all the data in that format. Once this letter is
    understood as a battle over power and sovereignty over all documents
    (and the information in them) ever created, the strong positions of
    these organizations all makes sense.

    8><----

    The European Commission's Valoris report explained why vetting by a
    neutral party is especially critical for XML-based document standards
    like the ones under discussion:

    "It is quite trivial to add elements to an XML document that place
    processing requirements and restrictions on the document, thus
    preventing cross-platform processing capability... While properly
    developed XML should in theory be platform-neutral, experience has shown
    that suppliers who wish to maintain and protect their platform's market
    will go to extents to encode elements that are capable of being
    processed only by their own application suites. The only counter-balance
    to this natural force is the development of open, cross-industry, widely
    adopted standards that serve to block the inclusion of application or
    platform specific encoding."

    http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20051029212458555

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Oct 31, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. thingy

    Peter Guest

    thingy wrote:

    > "By the way, some news articles and other various groups explained the
    > issue very poorly, suggesting that this decision was fundamentally about
    > "using open source software instead of Microsoft Office" or "throwing
    > away Microsoft Office."
    >
    > ==============
    > (not true, as we shall see, please read on or better follow the link)
    > ==============
    >

    <snip>
    > http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20051029212458555
    >

    The battle may be lost in Massachusetts thanks to USA's corrupt political
    system. Europe and New Zealand may be the next battlefields (I am assuming
    Australia is in USA's pocket). With respect to Europe, some EU members are
    critically dependent on Microsoft's presence (eg Irish republic) or worship
    Bill (eg Britain giving him an honorary knighthood - in this regard I hope
    that John Hood and his merry men at Oxford try and get one for Linus in due
    course).
    Peter, Nov 1, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. thingy

    thingy Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > thingy wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"By the way, some news articles and other various groups explained the
    >>issue very poorly, suggesting that this decision was fundamentally about
    >>"using open source software instead of Microsoft Office" or "throwing
    >>away Microsoft Office."
    >>
    >>==============
    >>(not true, as we shall see, please read on or better follow the link)
    >>==============
    >>

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>http://www.groklaw.net/article.php?story=20051029212458555
    >>

    >
    > The battle may be lost in Massachusetts thanks to USA's corrupt political
    > system.


    oh I dont know, I think they have researched well and will win. I think
    MS is flogging a dead horse on this one.

    Europe and New Zealand may be the next battlefields (I am assuming
    > Australia is in USA's pocket). With respect to Europe, some EU members are
    > critically dependent on Microsoft's presence (eg Irish republic) or worship
    > Bill (eg Britain giving him an honorary knighthood - in this regard I hope
    > that John Hood and his merry men at Oxford try and get one for Linus in due
    > course).


    heh.......Sir Linus....god I bet that would so p*ss off Bill the Borg.

    As for Ireland, the EU has already fined MS a record amount and I dont
    see Irelend bleeting that much.

    I expect the EU to follow through with the ODF, while in the US MS has
    leverage in a corrupt political system, it has little in Europe (I hope).

    I dont know what will happen with OZ, Bush is having a hard time, I dont
    expect his administration to be giving MS much support abroad (and to be
    seen interferring with a state is a huge no no).

    For NZ, I dont know yet but the fact that the IRD has signed up for
    Novell/suse software I take as a positive sign.

    regards

    Thing
    thingy, Nov 1, 2005
    #3
  4. thingy

    Peter Guest

    thingy wrote:


    > As for Ireland, the EU has already fined MS a record amount and I dont
    > see Irelend bleeting that much.


    But it was the Irish President trying to ram software patents through the EU
    at Microsoft's behest. Anyway, the 'record' fine would have been paid out
    of petty cash.

    >
    > I expect the EU to follow through with the ODF, while in the US MS has
    > leverage in a corrupt political system, it has little in Europe (I hope).


    No, the software patent business is still bubbling away.

    >
    > I dont know what will happen with OZ, Bush is having a hard time, I dont
    > expect his administration to be giving MS much support abroad (and to be
    > seen interferring with a state is a huge no no).


    It was American business interests who were pushing US Government to get
    Australia to adopt obnoxious IP laws as part of the free trade Agreement.

    >
    > For NZ, I dont know yet but the fact that the IRD has signed up for
    > Novell/suse software I take as a positive sign.
    >

    I think NZ politicians usually stay out of this sort of thing - their
    biggest worry however is an IT project blowout with political ramifications
    (eg INCIS).
    Peter, Nov 1, 2005
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Don Saklad
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    470
    Stan Brown
    Oct 30, 2003
  2. Defense Talent Network

    Sr Software Engineer, Woburn, Massachusetts

    Defense Talent Network, Jun 2, 2005, in forum: Computer Security
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    440
    Defense Talent Network
    Jun 2, 2005
  3. Imhotep

    Massachusetts is migrating to open-source software

    Imhotep, Sep 7, 2005, in forum: Computer Security
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    373
    Imhotep
    Sep 7, 2005
  4. Imhotep
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    389
    Imhotep
    Sep 26, 2005
  5. peterwn
    Replies:
    18
    Views:
    534
    Bruce Sinclair
    Nov 19, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page