Why is wireless not connected?

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by John, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. John

    John Guest

    John, Nov 18, 2010
    #1
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  2. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 18, 10:13 pm, "Alex Clayton" <> wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...

    >
    > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > It's hard to say without more info. Do you have a wireless router?
    > Is the wireless on the laptop turned on? It will have a switch or button to
    > turn it on and off.
    > As far as sharing the printer that is a different thing than connecting to
    > the net.
    > You are using Zone Alarm. You will need to make sure it is not blocking the
    > connection.
    > --
    > The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for.
    > Will Rogers


    No I don't have a wireless router. I have a wired one.

    I want to connect between two wireless adapters computer-to-computer
    (ad-hoc) to share wired internet connection, printer, shared folders
    while in same room.

    Zone Alarm is not blocking AFAIK it appears to be another problem.

    Wireless adapters are enabled on both laptop and desktop but not
    connected. They have a red X in both of them. I am unable to get them
    to connect or don't know how to.

    I managed to get the wireless adapter on the laptop switched on and
    enabled. It was a switch on the front of it that I completely missed
    first time around. Its a Toshiba Satellite Pro one. I have set it so
    that bluetooth is disabled and Wi-Fi is enabled. The only thing is it
    still is not connected despite being enabled. It has the red X through
    it and says not connected. Same with the desktop.

    When I go to Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance,
    Administrative Tools, Services, Wireless Zero Configuration, it never
    appears to be started automatically when I first switch on the laptop
    or desktop, I have to go in there and click on start.

    After doing this though there is no change it still says not connected
    and has a red X through Wireless Network Connection on both desktop
    and laptop.

    Am I missing something? Is there something I need to do first that
    I've not done? I've never set up a wireless network before so this is
    all new to me.

    Cheers,

    John
     
    John, Nov 18, 2010
    #2
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  3. John

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?
    >
    > http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_connected.jpg
    >
    > How do I get it to connect?
    >
    > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.


    These are a couple examples of wireless networking for home. The second
    example, is trying to do it as cheaply as possible.

    Wireless_Router_Box-
    | | \
    Computer#1 Computer#2 etc.


    Computer#1 ------------------ Computer#2
    (with Access Point) ("regular" Wifi)

    This is an example of an Access Point device. It uses "Soft AP", which
    means the driver does some of the work. If your desktop doesn't have
    wireless yet, this might be something to try out. There are
    actually a couple levels of Access Point devices. This one is
    "USB to Wifi" and is the cheapest. A "real Access Point" has
    an Ethernet interface on one side, and Wifi on the other. The
    "real Access Point" is also independently operated, and doesn't
    depend on the computer state. It's a separate box.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833328012

    http://www.sybausa.com/productInfo.php?iid=360

    A natural place to put the function, is on a router box. In some
    cases, you can get ADSL modem/router in one box, including a
    Wifi interface, and then that takes care of all your networking
    functions.

    The USB Access Point kind of solution, is intended to save a few bucks,
    but at the expense of having to keep the Access Point computer running
    if you want continued service. A couple of years ago, an access point
    might have cost around $50, and the distinction between an
    (independent) router and the access point, wasn't that large.

    This might be an "el-cheapo" home networking setup.

    Cable_modem (no router) ---- desktop (with Soft AP) ---- Laptop (regular Wifi)
    [enable Internet
    Connection Sharing
    on the desktop PC]

    This would be a more regular home networking setup, without ICS.
    If your cable_modem or ADSL_modem didn't have wireless, a separate
    Wifi router box can do that for you. I like to draw the picture this way,
    in case you get tired of your ISP, and need to change the "modem"
    part of the picture. This way, you're not buying the router part
    of the box, over and over again.

    Cable_modem --- Wifi_router
    | |
    | |
    Desktop with Laptop with
    regular Wifi Regular Wifi

    When setting up Wifi, it helps (slightly), if the devices
    are from the same manufacturer. Wifi has a few gotchas,
    where the data transfer rate depends on the modes the devices
    support. In some cases, the mere presence of a neighbor's Wifi
    equipment, can prevent your Wifi-N from running faster. If you're
    "in the woods", that would be an ideal situation to use
    "the best" gear. But in many other urban installations,
    you might not bother with fancy gadgets, because they're
    more likely to fall back to pathetic transfer rates. If
    I was in an apartment building for example, I probably
    wouldn't spend more than $20 per computer (because the
    level of RF pollution there is likely to be very high).

    Wireless devices, never give the data rate "printed on the tin".
    At best, they're going to give the next step down from max.
    So if a Wifi device promised 54Mbit/sec, then even before testing
    it, you'd assume no better than 27Mbit/sec. Or less than that,
    if there are propagation obstacles in the house. And sometimes,
    rather than there being too little signal, there's too much,
    and reflections from a strong transmitter prevent good results.
    So it isn't always a matter of "bolting on a booster" to fix it.

    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/component/option,com_wireless/Itemid,200

    That site has reviews for various kinds of wireless devices, showing
    actual transfer rate performance.

    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/24619-belkinf5d7130apreview

    You'll also find how-to articles, for setting up more extensive home
    networks. Here, a "real Access Point" is teamed with a wireless router,
    to solve whole house wireless access.

    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30355/228/

    (Picture of setup)
    http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/imag..._second_ap/wireless_multiap_powerline_new.jpg

    You'll notice, in that networking diagram, both Wifi boxes
    are on the same subnet.

    *******

    Wifi needs to be secured as well. You don't want some guy sitting
    in a car, outside your house, downloading the "Hurt Locker" movie
    over your Wifi. Wifi must be secured such that people other than yourself
    can't use it. Otherwise, if movies are being stolen via the Wifi,
    you could be liable.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wpa2#WPA2

    Have fun,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 18, 2010
    #3
  4. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 18, 11:37 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > John wrote:
    > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...

    >
    > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > These are a couple examples of wireless networking for home. The second
    > example, is trying to do it as cheaply as possible.
    >
    >      Wireless_Router_Box-
    >      |         |         \
    >   Computer#1  Computer#2  etc.
    >
    >    Computer#1 ------------------ Computer#2
    >    (with Access Point)           ("regular" Wifi)
    >
    > This is an example of an Access Point device. It uses "Soft AP", which
    > means the driver does some of the work. If your desktop doesn't have
    > wireless yet, this might be something to try out. There are
    > actually a couple levels of Access Point devices. This one is
    > "USB to Wifi" and is the cheapest. A "real Access Point" has
    > an Ethernet interface on one side, and Wifi on the other. The
    > "real Access Point" is also independently operated, and doesn't
    > depend on the computer state. It's a separate box.
    >
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833328012
    >
    > http://www.sybausa.com/productInfo.php?iid=360
    >
    > A natural place to put the function, is on a router box. In some
    > cases, you can get ADSL modem/router in one box, including a
    > Wifi interface, and then that takes care of all your networking
    > functions.
    >
    > The USB Access Point kind of solution, is intended to save a few bucks,
    > but at the expense of having to keep the Access Point computer running
    > if you want continued service. A couple of years ago, an access point
    > might have cost around $50, and the distinction between an
    > (independent) router and the access point, wasn't that large.
    >
    > This might be an "el-cheapo" home networking setup.
    >
    >    Cable_modem (no router) ---- desktop (with Soft AP) ---- Laptop (regular Wifi)
    >                                 [enable Internet
    >                                 Connection Sharing
    >                                 on the desktop PC]
    >
    > This would be a more regular home networking setup, without ICS.
    > If your cable_modem or ADSL_modem didn't have wireless, a separate
    > Wifi router box can do that for you. I like to draw the picture this way,
    > in case you get tired of your ISP, and need to change the "modem"
    > part of the picture. This way, you're not buying the router part
    > of the box, over and over again.
    >
    >    Cable_modem --- Wifi_router
    >                    |         |
    >                    |         |
    >                Desktop with  Laptop with
    >                regular Wifi  Regular Wifi
    >
    > When setting up Wifi, it helps (slightly), if the devices
    > are from the same manufacturer. Wifi has a few gotchas,
    > where the data transfer rate depends on the modes the devices
    > support. In some cases, the mere presence of a neighbor's Wifi
    > equipment, can prevent your Wifi-N from running faster. If you're
    > "in the woods", that would be an ideal situation to use
    > "the best" gear. But in many other urban installations,
    > you might not bother with fancy gadgets, because they're
    > more likely to fall back to pathetic transfer rates. If
    > I was in an apartment building for example, I probably
    > wouldn't spend more than $20 per computer (because the
    > level of RF pollution there is likely to be very high).
    >
    > Wireless devices, never give the data rate "printed on the tin".
    > At best, they're going to give the next step down from max.
    > So if a Wifi device promised 54Mbit/sec, then even before testing
    > it, you'd assume no better than 27Mbit/sec. Or less than that,
    > if there are propagation obstacles in the house. And sometimes,
    > rather than there being too little signal, there's too much,
    > and reflections from a strong transmitter prevent good results.
    > So it isn't always a matter of "bolting on a booster" to fix it.
    >
    > http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/component/option,com_wireless/Itemid,200
    >
    > That site has reviews for various kinds of wireless devices, showing
    > actual transfer rate performance.
    >
    > http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/24619-belkin...
    >
    > You'll also find how-to articles, for setting up more extensive home
    > networks. Here, a "real Access Point" is teamed with a wireless router,
    > to solve whole house wireless access.
    >
    > http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30355/228/
    >
    > (Picture of setup)http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/images/stories/wireless/howto_second_a...
    >
    > You'll notice, in that networking diagram, both Wifi boxes
    > are on the same subnet.
    >
    > *******
    >
    > Wifi needs to be secured as well. You don't want some guy sitting
    > in a car, outside your house, downloading the "Hurt Locker" movie
    > over your Wifi. Wifi must be secured such that people other than yourself
    > can't use it. Otherwise, if movies are being stolen via the Wifi,
    > you could be liable.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wpa2#WPA2
    >
    > Have fun,
    >     Paul



    Wireless adsl router wont work in this location because of the size of
    property, thickness of walls and distance between the two desktops and
    number of floors between them too. I just want to connect computer-to-
    computer ad hoc wirelessly so laptop can share desktops wired adsl
    internet connection as well as printer and files etc. Also I aint
    paying for a wireless adsl router due to Yorkshire stubborness and
    cost.

    I've gone through the whole process of setting up the wireless network
    to share the internet connection on the desktop and even created a
    network setup disk. The only problem remains is that the adapters will
    not connect and have a red X through them.

    It was not possible to get the same brand of wireless adapter card in
    the desktop as the laptop because the laptop one is an integrated
    Intel adapter while the only Intel ones I could see for Desktop were
    all PCI-Express based and there are no slots for that in this Fujitsu
    Siemens desktop I have only PCI so I had to get the Atheros wireless
    card.

    When I try and run the network setup disk on the laptop it gives the
    error message that "Some of this computers network hardware is still
    disconnected. Before you can continue, you must either plug in or
    otherwise connect all of your hardware, or select "Ignore disconnected
    network hardware"."

    What gives?

    How does one "connect" the wireless adapters in the laptop and desktop
    and get them talkin'? I still have red X's.

    The security is not a problem because it is all set up to run with a
    WEP key, its just being able to get these adapters to connect, they're
    not playing ball.

    Cheers,

    John
     
    John, Nov 18, 2010
    #4
  5. John

    Paul Guest

    John wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 11:37 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    >> John wrote:
    >>> Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?
    >>> http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...
    >>> How do I get it to connect?
    >>> I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    >>> connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.



    >
    >
    > Wireless adsl router wont work in this location because of the size of
    > property, thickness of walls and distance between the two desktops and
    > number of floors between them too. I just want to connect computer-to-
    > computer ad hoc wirelessly so laptop can share desktops wired adsl
    > internet connection as well as printer and files etc. Also I aint
    > paying for a wireless adsl router due to Yorkshire stubborness and
    > cost.
    >
    > I've gone through the whole process of setting up the wireless network
    > to share the internet connection on the desktop and even created a
    > network setup disk. The only problem remains is that the adapters will
    > not connect and have a red X through them.
    >
    > It was not possible to get the same brand of wireless adapter card in
    > the desktop as the laptop because the laptop one is an integrated
    > Intel adapter while the only Intel ones I could see for Desktop were
    > all PCI-Express based and there are no slots for that in this Fujitsu
    > Siemens desktop I have only PCI so I had to get the Atheros wireless
    > card.
    >
    > When I try and run the network setup disk on the laptop it gives the
    > error message that "Some of this computers network hardware is still
    > disconnected. Before you can continue, you must either plug in or
    > otherwise connect all of your hardware, or select "Ignore disconnected
    > network hardware"."
    >
    > What gives?
    >
    > How does one "connect" the wireless adapters in the laptop and desktop
    > and get them talkin'? I still have red X's.
    >
    > The security is not a problem because it is all set up to run with a
    > WEP key, its just being able to get these adapters to connect, they're
    > not playing ball.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John


    Intel has a recipe here. I don't use wireless here, and wasn't
    aware of adhoc mode. The instructions here seem to be saying,
    both computers should be in adhoc mode.

    http://www.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/cs-029492.htm

    I could also find an Intel manual.

    http://download.intel.com/support/w...rosetwireless_software_v120_xp_user_guide.pdf

    "Using the Manual Diagnostics Tool

    * For computers running Windows XP, first open the Intel
    PROSet/Wireless WiFi Connection Utility. Then under the Tools menu,
    click Manual Diagnostics tool.

    * For computers running Windows Vista, click
    Start > All Programs > Intel PROSet Wireless > WiFi Manual Diagnostics

    Available Tests

    Hardware Test

    Verify that your adapter is enabled in the Device Manager.
    When the adapter is disabled, a red X is displayed on the
    device. Right-click the adapter and select Enable from the
    menu."

    HTH,
    Paul
     
    Paul, Nov 19, 2010
    #5
  6. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 19, 12:18 am, Paul <> wrote:
    > John wrote:
    > > On Nov 18, 11:37 pm, Paul <> wrote:
    > >> John wrote:
    > >>> Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?
    > >>>http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con....
    > >>> How do I get it to connect?
    > >>> I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > >>> connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > > Wireless adsl router wont work in this location because of the size of
    > > property, thickness of walls and distance between the two desktops and
    > > number of floors between them too. I just want to connect computer-to-
    > > computer ad hoc wirelessly so laptop can share desktops wired adsl
    > > internet connection as well as printer and files etc. Also I aint
    > > paying for a wireless adsl router due to Yorkshire stubborness and
    > > cost.

    >
    > > I've gone through the whole process of setting up the wireless network
    > > to share the internet connection on the desktop and even created a
    > > network setup disk. The only problem remains is that the adapters will
    > > not connect and have a red X through them.

    >
    > > It was not possible to get the same brand of wireless adapter card in
    > > the desktop as the laptop because the laptop one is an integrated
    > > Intel adapter while the only Intel ones I could see for Desktop were
    > > all PCI-Express based and there are no slots for that in this Fujitsu
    > > Siemens desktop I have only PCI so I had to get the Atheros wireless
    > > card.

    >
    > > When I try and run the network setup disk on the laptop it gives the
    > > error message that "Some of this computers network hardware is still
    > > disconnected. Before you can continue, you must either plug in or
    > > otherwise connect all of your hardware, or select "Ignore disconnected
    > > network hardware"."

    >
    > > What gives?

    >
    > > How does one "connect" the wireless adapters in the laptop and desktop
    > > and get them talkin'? I still have red X's.

    >
    > > The security is not a problem because it is all set up to run with a
    > > WEP key, its just being able to get these adapters to connect, they're
    > > not playing ball.

    >
    > > Cheers,

    >
    > > John

    >
    > Intel has a recipe here. I don't use wireless here, and wasn't
    > aware of adhoc mode. The instructions here seem to be saying,
    > both computers should be in adhoc mode.
    >
    > http://www.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/cs-029492.htm
    >
    > I could also find an Intel manual.
    >
    > http://download.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/intel_prosetwirele...
    >
    >     "Using the Manual Diagnostics Tool
    >
    >      * For computers running Windows XP, first open the Intel
    >        PROSet/Wireless WiFi Connection Utility. Then under the Tools menu,
    >        click Manual Diagnostics tool.
    >
    >      * For computers running Windows Vista, click
    >        Start > All Programs > Intel PROSet Wireless > WiFi Manual Diagnostics
    >
    >      Available Tests
    >
    >      Hardware Test
    >
    >      Verify that your adapter is enabled in the Device Manager.
    >      When the adapter is disabled, a red X is displayed on the
    >      device. Right-click the adapter and select Enable from the
    >      menu."
    >
    > HTH,
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks. That Intel link is very useful.

    I have yet to try it on the laptop, but on the desktop I have managed
    to set up the ad hoc network with a few glitches.

    In Network Connection it still has the red X through Wireless Network
    Connection and saying "Not Connected".

    Within Wireless Network Connection it has the network name (SSID) and
    next to it it also says "Not connected", BUT beneath this it says
    "Security enabled computer-to-computer network, You are currently
    connected to this network. To disconnect from this network click
    disconnect". Then it has green bar graph with signal strength as
    excellent. This is really weird. XP seems to be contradicting itself.
    To be connected or not to be connected, that is the question.

    I'm going to try on laptop next.

    Cheers,

    John

    ps. btw... both wireless adapaters in desktop and laptop within device
    manage say that they are enabled and working properly.
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #6
  7. "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?
    >
    > http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_connected.jpg
    >
    > How do I get it to connect?
    >
    > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.



    The laptop has an ON/OFF switch for the wireless. It is a physical switch
    that you have to turn on. The idea is that when you are not going wireless,
    you can turn the adaptor off to extend the battery.

    Then, of course, you have the whole WEP/WPA Security stuff that you have to
    setup properly.
     
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 19, 2010
    #7
  8. "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Nov 18, 10:13 pm, "Alex Clayton" <> wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...

    >
    > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > It's hard to say without more info. Do you have a wireless router?
    > Is the wireless on the laptop turned on? It will have a switch or button
    > to
    > turn it on and off.
    > As far as sharing the printer that is a different thing than connecting to
    > the net.
    > You are using Zone Alarm. You will need to make sure it is not blocking
    > the
    > connection.
    > --
    > The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for.
    > Will Rogers


    No I don't have a wireless router. I have a wired one.

    I want to connect between two wireless adapters computer-to-computer
    (ad-hoc) to share wired internet connection, printer, shared folders
    while in same room.

    Zone Alarm is not blocking AFAIK it appears to be another problem.

    Wireless adapters are enabled on both laptop and desktop but not
    connected. They have a red X in both of them. I am unable to get them
    to connect or don't know how to.

    I managed to get the wireless adapter on the laptop switched on and
    enabled. It was a switch on the front of it that I completely missed
    first time around. Its a Toshiba Satellite Pro one. I have set it so
    that bluetooth is disabled and Wi-Fi is enabled. The only thing is it
    still is not connected despite being enabled. It has the red X through
    it and says not connected. Same with the desktop.

    When I go to Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance,
    Administrative Tools, Services, Wireless Zero Configuration, it never
    appears to be started automatically when I first switch on the laptop
    or desktop, I have to go in there and click on start.

    After doing this though there is no change it still says not connected
    and has a red X through Wireless Network Connection on both desktop
    and laptop.

    Am I missing something? Is there something I need to do first that
    I've not done? I've never set up a wireless network before so this is
    all new to me.

    Cheers,

    John


    <JS>
    Well, you're gonna need to have a wireless router. That's the first step.

    A wireless router will have CAT5 ports on the back to support the wired
    machines, but it also has an antenna to allow access from the wireless
    machines. I _strongly suggest a Wireless N router.

    </JS>
     
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 19, 2010
    #8
  9. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 19, 4:16 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...

    >
    > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > The laptop has an ON/OFF switch for the wireless. It is a physical switch
    > that you have to turn on. The idea is that when you are not going wireless,
    > you can turn the adaptor off to extend the battery.
    >
    > Then, of course, you have the whole WEP/WPA Security stuff that you have to
    > setup properly.


    Yeah I know. I have the switch on with the laptop, wifi enabled and
    bluetooth disabled but it is still saying it is disconnected and has a
    red x through it.
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #9
  10. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 19, 4:19 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > On Nov 18, 10:13 pm, "Alex Clayton" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "John" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:...

    >
    > > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con....

    >
    > > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > > It's hard to say without more info. Do you have a wireless router?
    > > Is the wireless on the laptop turned on? It will have a switch or button
    > > to
    > > turn it on and off.
    > > As far as sharing the printer that is a different thing than connecting to
    > > the net.
    > > You are using Zone Alarm. You will need to make sure it is not blocking
    > > the
    > > connection.
    > > --
    > > The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for.
    > > Will Rogers

    >
    > No I don't have a wireless router. I have a wired one.
    >
    > I want to connect between two wireless adapters computer-to-computer
    > (ad-hoc) to share wired internet connection, printer, shared folders
    > while in same room.
    >
    > Zone Alarm is not blocking AFAIK it appears to be another problem.
    >
    > Wireless adapters are enabled on both laptop and desktop but not
    > connected. They have a red X in both of them. I am unable to get them
    > to connect or don't know how to.
    >
    > I managed to get the wireless adapter on the laptop switched on and
    > enabled. It was a switch on the front of it that I completely missed
    > first time around. Its a Toshiba Satellite Pro one. I have set it so
    > that bluetooth is disabled and Wi-Fi is enabled. The only thing is it
    > still is not connected despite being enabled. It has the red X through
    > it and says not connected. Same with the desktop.
    >
    > When I go to Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance,
    > Administrative Tools, Services, Wireless Zero Configuration, it never
    > appears to be started automatically when I first switch on the laptop
    > or desktop, I have to go in there and click on start.
    >
    > After doing this though there is no change it still says not connected
    > and has a red X through Wireless Network Connection on both desktop
    > and laptop.
    >
    > Am I missing something? Is there something I need to do first that
    > I've not done? I've never set up a wireless network before so this is
    > all new to me.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John
    >
    > <JS>
    > Well, you're gonna need to have a wireless router. That's the first step.
    >
    > A wireless router will have CAT5 ports on the back to support the wired
    > machines, but it also has an antenna to allow access from the wireless
    > machines. I _strongly suggest a Wireless N router.
    >
    > </JS>- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I don't need a wireless router and neither does my wallet. I have two
    wireless adapters that should be able to communicate with each other
    when in the same room for a laptop-to-computer ad hoc connection, My
    desktop has an antenna on the back of it to support a wireless
    connection with the laptop which has an internal antena. I want to get
    them talking ad-hoc.

    At the moment they both say not connected even though they are
    enabled. I just need to make them connect. If they wont connect
    between each other how are they going to connect with a wireless
    router? I am going to have the same problem regardless that they wont
    connect plus I will have less money in my pockets, plus I don't need a
    wireless router as it is just an infrequent ad-hoc computer-to-
    computer connection that I need, plus I don't want all the radiation/
    radio waves filling up the place all the time, plus many other reasons
    not least security.
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #10
  11. John

    John Guest

    > Intel has a recipe here. I don't use wireless here, and wasn't
    > aware of adhoc mode. The instructions here seem to be saying,
    > both computers should be in adhoc mode.
    >
    > http://www.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/cs-029492.htm
    >
    > I could also find an Intel manual.
    >
    > http://download.intel.com/support/wireless/wlan/sb/intel_prosetwirele...
    >
    >     "Using the Manual Diagnostics Tool
    >
    >      * For computers running Windows XP, first open the Intel
    >        PROSet/Wireless WiFi Connection Utility. Then under the Tools menu,
    >        click Manual Diagnostics tool.
    >
    >      * For computers running Windows Vista, click
    >        Start > All Programs > Intel PROSet Wireless > WiFi Manual Diagnostics
    >
    >      Available Tests
    >
    >      Hardware Test
    >
    >      Verify that your adapter is enabled in the Device Manager.
    >      When the adapter is disabled, a red X is displayed on the
    >      device. Right-click the adapter and select Enable from the
    >      menu."
    >
    > HTH,
    >     Paul- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -



    Just checking in this laptop and there's no Intel Connection Utility
    within Programs, so I'll have to find a different way to set up the ad-
    hoc connection.
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #11
  12. John

    John Guest

    Right, I've managed to get the wireless adapters connected on both
    laptop and desktop now on the same network (SSID) and with the same
    network WEP key.

    The Zone Alarm firewall on the desktop popped up with a message saying
    new network found so I selected it into the trusted zone.

    Zone Alarm on the laptop didn't come up with anything. It appears it
    is an older version. I may have to manually add it in there, but I may
    just download new version install that turn back on and allow it to do
    it for me automatically.

    Then it will just be a matter of figuring out how to share the
    internet connection over the wireless network as well as printer and
    shared folders.

    Cheers,

    John
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #12
  13. John

    Kele Guest

    John, two more cents (sense?)

    Did you check Control Panel & find > Services to insure the respective WiFi
    required services are running?

    Black Viper's page for Services settings (and descriptions of services),
    Default and Tweaked (look for page corresponding to your operating system):
    http://www.blackviper.com/WinVista/servicecfg.htm

    Careful, Black Viper tweaks (and sometimes the default), including "Safe",
    would have you disable services needed for WiFi. For example, the service
    "WLAN Autoconfig" must be running to use WiFi.

    Your screen-shot shows the WiFi icon (adapter) to be enabled ready to go;
    something else isn't engaged is why I was thinking Services. If I
    understand you correctly, you're trying to gain wireless Internet access
    (for a laptop) through another computer that (now) has working access to the
    Internet via a hardwired telephone line; you [do not] have an Ethernet cable
    to your dwelling. Did you try disconnecting the desktop PC from the
    Internet connection and substitute in the Laptop just to see if all else is
    copasetic? If it functions in a wired LAN, then the problem is the WiFi to
    the Desktop PC... and then I would look into Ports open. I did finally get
    a wireless Win7 laptop to have print capability though an XP desktop when I
    discovered the correct network address format: \\computername\printername .

    - Kele



    -------------------------
    > The laptop has an ON/OFF switch for the wireless. It is a physical switch
    > that you have to turn on. The idea is that when you are not going
    > wireless,
    > you can turn the adaptor off to extend the battery.
    >
    > Then, of course, you have the whole WEP/WPA Security stuff that you have
    > to
    > setup properly.


    Yeah I know. I have the switch on with the laptop, wifi enabled and
    bluetooth disabled but it is still saying it is disconnected and has a
    red x through it.
     
    Kele, Nov 19, 2010
    #13
  14. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 19, 5:46 pm, John <> wrote:
    > Right, I've managed to get the wireless adapters connected on both
    > laptop and desktop now on the same network (SSID) and with the same
    > network WEP key.
    >
    > The Zone Alarm firewall on the desktop popped up with a message saying
    > new network found so I selected it into the trusted zone.
    >
    > Zone Alarm on the laptop didn't come up with anything. It appears it
    > is an older version. I may have to manually add it in there, but I may
    > just download new version install that turn back on and allow it to do
    > it for me automatically.
    >
    > Then it will just be a matter of figuring out how to share the
    > internet connection over the wireless network as well as printer and
    > shared folders.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John


    I appear to have been able to get the laptop to share the internet
    connection now over the wireless network with the desktop host by
    deselecting the shared the shared check box in the LAN and then
    bridging the LAN with the Wireless adapter for the desktop.

    The only issue I now have is that Zone Alarm on the desktop keeps
    coming up with a Security Alert saying "New Subnet". Zone Alarm has
    detected a New Network detected with IP 10.0.0.0/255.0.0.0 and added
    it to the Internet Zone.

    I click Okay, and another bigger box comes up asking me to select a
    security level for it. The options are Internet Zone or Trusted Zone.
    No matter what I select for this Private Network ZA immediately keeps
    the message popping up again and again. I can't get rid of it.

    John
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #14
  15. John

    Kele Guest

    Hey John,

    I'm sending a second message here...

    You say about router and security but I found that my router and, I think
    this is common, has a built-in firewall.

    The D-Link Wireless N router we use has an awesome firewall that stealth's
    everything behind it; sites like this [
    https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2 ] port scan and we are "invisible".
    No need for a firewall program running on the PCs. The router's control
    panel shows who's connected and I've never seen anyone other than my home
    PCs listed. Routers are passworded and I haven't been able to leach off any
    of my neighbor's signals so I don't suspect they can hack mine either. The
    D-link also has three settings for power output and I tried it to the point
    where the wireless laptop rooms away showed a decrease signal strength of
    fair-poor down from excellent when on max range. It actually does change!
    So the radiation can be adjusted - though I hear that you get more radiation
    checking your mail box. I've had a router for less than a year and I like
    it. I would keep the router in the chain even if there was only one PC in
    the house because of the seamless firewall it provides. Some say a router
    will actually help with connection speed; not sure about that but do think
    it doesn't slow it down at all.

    - Kele




    -----------------------------------------------
    "John" wrote:
    I don't need a wireless router and neither does my wallet. I have two
    wireless adapters that should be able to communicate with each other
    when in the same room for a laptop-to-computer ad hoc connection, My
    desktop has an antenna on the back of it to support a wireless
    connection with the laptop which has an internal antena. I want to get
    them talking ad-hoc.

    At the moment they both say not connected even though they are
    enabled. I just need to make them connect. If they wont connect
    between each other how are they going to connect with a wireless
    router? I am going to have the same problem regardless that they wont
    connect plus I will have less money in my pockets, plus I don't need a
    wireless router as it is just an infrequent ad-hoc computer-to-
    computer connection that I need, plus I don't want all the radiation/
    radio waves filling up the place all the time, plus many other reasons
    not least security.
     
    Kele, Nov 19, 2010
    #15
  16. John

    John Guest

    On Nov 19, 6:27 pm, "Kele" <> wrote:
    > John, two more cents (sense?)
    >
    > Did you check Control Panel & find > Services to insure the respective WiFi
    > required services are running?
    >
    > Black Viper's page for Services settings (and descriptions of services),
    > Default and Tweaked (look for page corresponding to your operating system):http://www.blackviper.com/WinVista/servicecfg.htm
    >
    > Careful, Black Viper tweaks (and sometimes the default), including "Safe",
    > would have you disable services needed for WiFi.  For example, the service
    > "WLAN Autoconfig" must be running to use WiFi.
    >
    > Your screen-shot shows the WiFi icon (adapter) to be enabled ready to go;
    > something else isn't engaged is why I was thinking Services.  If I
    > understand you correctly, you're trying to gain wireless Internet access
    > (for a laptop) through another computer that (now) has working access to the
    > Internet via a hardwired telephone line; you [do not] have an Ethernet cable
    > to your dwelling.  Did you try disconnecting the desktop PC from the
    > Internet connection and substitute in the Laptop just to see if all else is
    > copasetic?  If it functions in a wired LAN, then the problem is the WiFi to
    > the Desktop PC... and then I would look into Ports open.  I did finally get
    > a wireless Win7 laptop to have print capability though an XP desktop when I
    > discovered the correct network address format: \\computername\printername .
    >
    > - Kele
    >
    > -------------------------


    Thanks Kele I will look into this.

    I think I have a problem with the Toshiba laptop because the Wireless
    Zero Configuration Service doesn't start automatically when I boot
    Windows up. I believe it may be a conflict between Toshibas software
    and Microsofts, with Toshibas over-riding it so that its not started
    at logon. Each time I turn on the laptop I have to go in and manually
    start the service.

    I seem to have sorted out the Zone Alarm messages by just rebooting.
    Have updated the ZA on the laptop and installed MSE too. I'm not sure
    what the firewall is like with the adsl router I have or if it has
    one, it is quite an old one though. I still wish to have ZA installed
    for the possible times connection to the web wont be made via this
    wired adsl router. The laptop connects wirelessly when mobile as well.

    John
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #16
  17. "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Nov 19, 4:19 pm, "Jeff Strickland" <> wrote:
    > "John" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    > On Nov 18, 10:13 pm, "Alex Clayton" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "John" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:...

    >
    > > > Do you know why the wireless on my computer says "not connected"?

    >
    > > >http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e259/john10001/com/wireless_not_con...

    >
    > > > How do I get it to connect?

    >
    > > > I want to set up a wireless network connection so my laptop can
    > > > connect with desktop and share internet, printer, shared folders etc.

    >
    > > It's hard to say without more info. Do you have a wireless router?
    > > Is the wireless on the laptop turned on? It will have a switch or button
    > > to
    > > turn it on and off.
    > > As far as sharing the printer that is a different thing than connecting
    > > to
    > > the net.
    > > You are using Zone Alarm. You will need to make sure it is not blocking
    > > the
    > > connection.
    > > --
    > > The older we get, the fewer things seem worth waiting in line for.
    > > Will Rogers

    >
    > No I don't have a wireless router. I have a wired one.
    >
    > I want to connect between two wireless adapters computer-to-computer
    > (ad-hoc) to share wired internet connection, printer, shared folders
    > while in same room.
    >
    > Zone Alarm is not blocking AFAIK it appears to be another problem.
    >
    > Wireless adapters are enabled on both laptop and desktop but not
    > connected. They have a red X in both of them. I am unable to get them
    > to connect or don't know how to.
    >
    > I managed to get the wireless adapter on the laptop switched on and
    > enabled. It was a switch on the front of it that I completely missed
    > first time around. Its a Toshiba Satellite Pro one. I have set it so
    > that bluetooth is disabled and Wi-Fi is enabled. The only thing is it
    > still is not connected despite being enabled. It has the red X through
    > it and says not connected. Same with the desktop.
    >
    > When I go to Control Panel, Performance and Maintenance,
    > Administrative Tools, Services, Wireless Zero Configuration, it never
    > appears to be started automatically when I first switch on the laptop
    > or desktop, I have to go in there and click on start.
    >
    > After doing this though there is no change it still says not connected
    > and has a red X through Wireless Network Connection on both desktop
    > and laptop.
    >
    > Am I missing something? Is there something I need to do first that
    > I've not done? I've never set up a wireless network before so this is
    > all new to me.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John
    >
    > <JS>
    > Well, you're gonna need to have a wireless router. That's the first step.
    >
    > A wireless router will have CAT5 ports on the back to support the wired
    > machines, but it also has an antenna to allow access from the wireless
    > machines. I _strongly suggest a Wireless N router.
    >
    > </JS>- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I don't need a wireless router and neither does my wallet. I have two
    wireless adapters that should be able to communicate with each other
    when in the same room for a laptop-to-computer ad hoc connection, My
    desktop has an antenna on the back of it to support a wireless
    connection with the laptop which has an internal antena. I want to get
    them talking ad-hoc.

    At the moment they both say not connected even though they are
    enabled. I just need to make them connect. If they wont connect
    between each other how are they going to connect with a wireless
    router? I am going to have the same problem regardless that they wont
    connect plus I will have less money in my pockets, plus I don't need a
    wireless router as it is just an infrequent ad-hoc computer-to-
    computer connection that I need, plus I don't want all the radiation/
    radio waves filling up the place all the time, plus many other reasons
    not least security.



    <JS>
    I'm not sure you are correct on what you have as sufficient to do what you
    are doing. I believe you need a wireless router. The antenna that you have
    on your PC would indicate that there is a wireless adaptor, but you still
    need a router for it to talk to.

    Having said that, I've never setup an ad hoc network, so I'm not clear on
    the requirements. But I do have a wireless network in my home, and a
    wireless router is a required piece of equipment.


    </JS>
     
    Jeff Strickland, Nov 19, 2010
    #17
  18. John

    John Guest

    Not too sure where I need to go from black vipers info on Zero
    Configuration: http://wiki.blackviper.com/wiki/Wireless_Zero_Configuration

    Am I going into the registry? Admin Tools and Services? System 32
    folder? Need to get Wireless Zero Configuration automatically starting
    when I turn laptop on. I can check on both but pretty sure it starts
    automatically on desktop already.

    When I have been connected the speed is very good for the internet
    view wireless adapter to desktop. I have signal strength of very good
    on the tosh and excellent on desktop.

    I believe Toshibas software is preventing WZC from automatically
    starting though and it also seems to uncheck the box in the wireless
    adapter that says "Use windows to configure my wireless network
    settings". From what I have read on black vipers site he seems to be
    saying not to go in via msconfig that I need to do it another way to
    enable it automatically. Only trouble is that going in through admin
    tools and services it keeps reverting to non-started at boot up which
    I think is the Toshiba software that's at fault.

    John
     
    John, Nov 19, 2010
    #18
  19. John

    Kele Guest

    John,

    There's allot I don't know and that wiki about Wireless Zero Config is one
    of them.

    It's the Admin Tools Services location you sited. There's 9 ways to get
    there but this way works in both XP and Win7. Right click on My Computer
    (on desktop), select Manage > Services and Applications > Services
    An alphabetical list of services appears, expand the window to more easily
    see the columns - I see it: Wireless Zero / Started / Auto.

    I have a feeling you know all this, John, so skip to the next para. I'm
    typing this part for others who haven't yet had the pleasure of messing with
    their Services. Control+Alt+Delete... see all the processes running. You
    can reduce the number of processes running by disabling Services that aren't
    necessary for you. Usually an XP computer will have 32+ Services running.
    After disabling unnecessary Services, mine is now 19. Less running Services
    = less drain on System resources (RAM, etc) and a faster computer
    experience. I have a relic 386 MB RAM dumpster dive PC so keeping lean and
    mean helps when Photoshop opens. Learn more about it before making
    changes. Resist changing more than one or two things at a time so you can
    undo if necessary.

    Right click on a service > Properties > Start-up Type and other functions
    can be changed. Manual won't necessarily start again after a re-boot. If
    you want it to stick, pick Auto or on Win7 the new choice, Delayed Auto.
    The Autos will (should) stick after re-boot. I caught a virus that turned
    all my services off - all of them! That's when I found (using another
    computer) Black Viper http://www.blackviper.com/. WARNING - the Viper
    tweaks would have you disable wireless required services, so read the
    service definition as to what the service does before disabling and see my
    other posts, same subject.

    So that's how I would make a service "Automatic"; I've never had to deal
    with the registry for Services start/stop or otherwise. The Run >
    "msconfig" Services tab is useful to uncheck current running processes (and
    unwanted software that installed itself) but starting & stopping them via
    Admin Tools > Services is the sure way the change remains after reboot.

    - Kele

    PS: Adhoc is beyond my experience. You seem determined and smart; that's a
    dangerous combination. Let us all know how it's done when you have your
    eureka moment.

    PSS: take Zone Alarm off-line (out of the equation) while trying to get this
    working. Try laptop browser's Internet connection wizard. Besides
    Internet, try to pass files wirelessly from PC to Laptop & back.





    -----------------------------------
    "John" <> wrote:
    Not too sure where I need to go from black vipers info on Zero
    Configuration: http://wiki.blackviper.com/wiki/Wireless_Zero_Configuration

    Am I going into the registry? Admin Tools and Services? System 32
    folder? Need to get Wireless Zero Configuration automatically starting
    when I turn laptop on. I can check on both but pretty sure it starts
    automatically on desktop already.

    When I have been connected the speed is very good for the internet
    view wireless adapter to desktop. I have signal strength of very good
    on the tosh and excellent on desktop.

    I believe Toshibas software is preventing WZC from automatically
    starting though and it also seems to uncheck the box in the wireless
    adapter that says "Use windows to configure my wireless network
    settings". From what I have read on black vipers site he seems to be
    saying not to go in via msconfig that I need to do it another way to
    enable it automatically. Only trouble is that going in through admin
    tools and services it keeps reverting to non-started at boot up which
    I think is the Toshiba software that's at fault.

    John
     
    Kele, Nov 20, 2010
    #19
  20. John

    Kele Guest

    You're doing it, John. I'm proud of you... this is a hard one.

    I used Zone Alarm on my desktop prior to getting a router. Try telling Zone
    Alarm to allow (fully) the IP address of the offending computer.

    - Kele





    "John" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Nov 19, 5:46 pm, John <> wrote:
    > Right, I've managed to get the wireless adapters connected on both
    > laptop and desktop now on the same network (SSID) and with the same
    > network WEP key.
    >
    > The Zone Alarm firewall on the desktop popped up with a message saying
    > new network found so I selected it into the trusted zone.
    >
    > Zone Alarm on the laptop didn't come up with anything. It appears it
    > is an older version. I may have to manually add it in there, but I may
    > just download new version install that turn back on and allow it to do
    > it for me automatically.
    >
    > Then it will just be a matter of figuring out how to share the
    > internet connection over the wireless network as well as printer and
    > shared folders.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > John


    I appear to have been able to get the laptop to share the internet
    connection now over the wireless network with the desktop host by
    deselecting the shared the shared check box in the LAN and then
    bridging the LAN with the Wireless adapter for the desktop.

    The only issue I now have is that Zone Alarm on the desktop keeps
    coming up with a Security Alert saying "New Subnet". Zone Alarm has
    detected a New Network detected with IP 10.0.0.0/255.0.0.0 and added
    it to the Internet Zone.

    I click Okay, and another bigger box comes up asking me to select a
    security level for it. The options are Internet Zone or Trusted Zone.
    No matter what I select for this Private Network ZA immediately keeps
    the message popping up again and again. I can't get rid of it.

    John
     
    Kele, Nov 20, 2010
    #20
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