Why getting Corrupted jpgs on my Compact flash CARD?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by lbbss, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. lbbss

    lbbss Guest

    What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    card? Last time I got one complete directory with all corrupted picture
    and the second directory had random corrupted pictures. tx
     
    lbbss, Sep 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. lbbss

    HRosita Guest

    Battery low?
    Rosita
     
    HRosita, Sep 14, 2004
    #2
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  3. lbbss

    Gadgets Guest

    Have seen probs when a card from a Nikon went into a Fuji (and vice versa)
    and wasn't formatted first. Format on first use and when changing cameras,
    and maybe after some time of regular use. Avoid preview images from
    computer directly off the card - copy them over to hard drive first - saves
    your viewing program from possibly creating temp files on your flash card.
    Keep your card/camera contacts clean and avoid touching the business end of
    your card. Otherwise if you do all that, then your card might be dodgy!

    Cheers, Jason (remove ... to reply)
    Video & Gaming: http://gadgetaus.com
     
    Gadgets, Sep 14, 2004
    #3
  4. lbbss

    lbbss Guest

    That's what I did, switch cf card to different camera. Thanks
     
    lbbss, Sep 14, 2004
    #4
  5. lbbss

    Ron Hunter Guest

    lbbss wrote:
    > What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    > card? Last time I got one complete directory with all corrupted picture
    > and the second directory had random corrupted pictures. tx
    >
    >

    There are several reasons this might happen. First, are you sure the
    pictures on the card are corrupt? Have you tried the card back in the
    camera? Are the pictures corrupt there? If not, then the transfer is
    the problem. Other devices on the USB port, if that was used, can cause
    problems with transfers. If the pictures on the card really are
    corrupt, then the problem could be caused by turning off the camera
    while a picture was being written to the card. Sometimes this will
    corrupt a whole directory. The problem could also result from batteries
    going too low during the writing to the card.
     
    Ron Hunter, Sep 14, 2004
    #5
  6. lbbss

    JeffTaite Guest

    On Tue, 14 Sep 2004 13:24:28 -0500, Ron Hunter
    <> wrote:

    >lbbss wrote:
    >> What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    >> card? Last time I got one complete directory with all corrupted picture
    >> and the second directory had random corrupted pictures. tx
    >>
    >>

    >There are several reasons this might happen. First, are you sure the
    >pictures on the card are corrupt? Have you tried the card back in the
    >camera? Are the pictures corrupt there? If not, then the transfer is
    >the problem. Other devices on the USB port, if that was used, can cause
    >problems with transfers. If the pictures on the card really are
    >corrupt, then the problem could be caused by turning off the camera
    >while a picture was being written to the card. Sometimes this will
    >corrupt a whole directory. The problem could also result from batteries
    >going too low during the writing to the card.


    One other culprit could be the USB cable itself. I recently
    installed a USB 2.0 card into my computer. Wanting to re-use the
    existing USB ports on the front of the case of the computer, I built
    a cable to go from those to the USB card's extra internal
    connectors. I didn't think there'd be any problem because the cable
    I used for this had larger guage wires and was heavily shielded, the
    kind with the braided-wire shielding. On some transfers from camera
    to computer the transfer rates would become exceedingly slow (or
    just err-out) and I started getting corrupted image files, on files
    that I knew were perfectly fine.

    After some trouble-shooting I found out that that little extra
    length of cable was picking up stray EMF from within the computer
    case. After putting extra snap-on ferrite cores around the start and
    end of that cable and rerouting it inside the case, the USB 2.0
    ports now work perfectly fine.

    This leads me to believe that sometimes these corrupted image
    stories might be solved with something as simple as moving the USB
    cable or computer a little further away from the monitor or other
    EMF sources (fluorescent lights, cordless mice, wireless LAN
    hardware, etc.). Those thin USB cables provided with most cameras
    don't have anywhere near as much shielding as that cable I used for
    my project and are much longer. They're probably even more prone to
    picking up interfering frequencies.
     
    JeffTaite, Sep 15, 2004
    #6
  7. << What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    card? >>

    Ibbss-

    There is a difference between erasing photos on the card, and formatting the
    card. When you move the card to a different camera, you should format it in
    that camera.

    My camera's instruction manual was very specific about formatting the card for
    that particular camera, not in a different kind of camera or in the computer
    (using a card reader). As long as you don't change cameras, it is safe to
    "erase all" photos rather than re-formatting the card. Erasing may be a bit
    faster than formatting.

    Fred
     
    Fred McKenzie, Sep 16, 2004
    #7
  8. lbbss

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Fred McKenzie wrote:
    > << What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    > card? >>
    >
    > Ibbss-
    >
    > There is a difference between erasing photos on the card, and formatting the
    > card. When you move the card to a different camera, you should format it in
    > that camera.
    >
    > My camera's instruction manual was very specific about formatting the card for
    > that particular camera, not in a different kind of camera or in the computer
    > (using a card reader). As long as you don't change cameras, it is safe to
    > "erase all" photos rather than re-formatting the card. Erasing may be a bit
    > faster than formatting.
    >
    > Fred
    >

    NOT if you have a lot of pictures. First, each directory entry must be
    found and rewritten, then the FAT must be updated for each deletion. In
    a format, it is only necessary to write a 'blank' FAT and root directory
    from ROM.
    Usually MUCH faster.
     
    Ron Hunter, Sep 16, 2004
    #8
  9. lbbss

    Jim Townsend Guest

    lbbss wrote:

    > What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    > card? Last time I got one complete directory with all corrupted picture
    > and the second directory had random corrupted pictures. tx


    Bad card could be one reason.

    I just had a Lexar 512MB CF card go bad last week.. The camera dies
    with an error when trying to write to it. Some images have lines
    and others are unreadable.

    All my other cards work OK.
     
    Jim Townsend, Sep 16, 2004
    #9
  10. On 16 Sep 2004 11:05:16 GMT, (Fred McKenzie) wrote:

    ><< What are some of the reasons you can get corrupted unreadable jpgs on a cf
    >card? >>


    The main reasons would be turning the camera off while it is writing
    to the card, or pulling the card out while the camera is still
    writing. In some cases it could be removing or inserting the card
    while the camera is turned on.

    >
    >Ibbss-
    >
    >There is a difference between erasing photos on the card, and formatting the


    Not much.

    >card. When you move the card to a different camera, you should format it in
    >that camera.


    Why?

    I routinely move cards between my Nikon D-70 and the Oly E-20N. Both
    use FAT-16 as do most cameras. Each creates its own directory
    structure the first time the camera is turned on after the card is
    inserted.

    I can shoot 5 images in the D-70, put the card in the E-20N and shoot
    5 more. I can then put it back in the D-70 and continue to shoot.
    When I download the images the computer sees the card as one drive
    with a separate directory for each camera.

    Unless the cameras use different formatting there is no reason to
    reformat when moving from one camera to another. It is possible that
    some of the simpler cameras can not distinguish between directories,
    but even then they should ignore the other directory.

    I have three 250 meg CF cards with the dual directories that I have
    been using that way since Late Winter. I have had only one corrupt
    image file out of over 7,000 images between the two cameras.
    Actually that corrupt image was in the E-20N before I started using
    the D-70 and was caused by turning the camera off during a write.
    I erased the image and all was fine.

    >
    >My camera's instruction manual was very specific about formatting the card for
    >that particular camera, not in a different kind of camera or in the computer


    There is nothing wrong with formatting in a card reader for
    _most_cameras. You only have to use the correct format which is
    usually FAT-16. Some of the newer ones that can accept large CF cards
    use FAT-32. It has to be something recognized by the computer,
    otherwise the camera, or card reader would not show up as another
    drive.

    >(using a card reader). As long as you don't change cameras, it is safe to


    That is one specific camera. I'd be surprised if many are that way.

    >"erase all" photos rather than re-formatting the card. Erasing may be a bit
    >faster than formatting.


    Both should be almost instantaneous.
    There is little difference in how they work and in a CF card it
    involves very few changes..

    Erasing removes the pointers to the file from the directory, but
    leaves the files intact.

    Formatting removes all pointers. It does not "zero out" the memory.
    Contrary to what some believe it works just like formatting a hard
    drive. It is after all, the same software doing the formatting when
    in the card reader and it is using the same format as on the HD.

    IF the format did zero out the files, recovery software wouldn't work,
    but it does. You can recover deleted files and quite often files from
    a formatted drive, but you can not recover over written files.

    Roger Halstead (K8RI & ARRL life member)
    (N833R, S# CD-2 Worlds oldest Debonair)
    www.rogerhalstead.com

    >
    >Fred
     
    Roger Halstead, Sep 16, 2004
    #10
  11. lbbss

    Colin D Guest

    Roger Halstead wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > I routinely move cards between my Nikon D-70 and the Oly E-20N. Both
    > use FAT-16 as do most cameras. Each creates its own directory
    > structure the first time the camera is turned on after the card is
    > inserted


    I believe the D70 uses fat16 if the card is smaller than 2Gb, but will
    use fat32 for larger cards.

    Colin.
     
    Colin D, Sep 17, 2004
    #11
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