Why does my new TV have so much trouble with sound but not picture?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Matty F, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    one day.

    In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    concrete monstrosity just built next door.

    My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?

    IF stereosound=crap
    THEN use mono
    END

    The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.

    So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    the bar and carrying on.
     
    Matty F, Mar 18, 2011
    #1
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  2. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 18/03/2011 7:38 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    > hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    > one day.
    >
    > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    > I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    > a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    > But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    > concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >
    > My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    > every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    > TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >
    > IF stereosound=crap
    > THEN use mono
    > END
    >
    > The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.
    >
    > So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    > dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    > and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    > bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    > the bar and carrying on.


    It may have autotuned it with the wrong audio offset for analog, the
    nicam will still work but the analog audio will not. Go into the tuning
    menu and check that it is on B/G and not I or one of the other ones.

    And they do, if I have no antenna in my TV here, I get mono sound, as
    the antenna plug gets closer to the socket as the picture starts to
    clear up the nicam will kick in and it changes to stereo

    What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.
     
    Richard, Mar 18, 2011
    #2
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  3. In message
    <>, Matty F
    wrote:

    > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.


    NICAM digital stereo is probably the most robust component of the NZ analog
    TV signal (while Teletext is the least). In other words, it’s not likely to
    give trouble until the picture has become close to unwatchable.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Mar 18, 2011
    #3
  4. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 18, 8:23 pm, Richard <> wrote:

    > What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    > needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    > F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.


    It's nothing to do with the cables of course.
    The aerial consists of dozens of aluminium rods with aluminium
    connectors that swap from side to side. The supplied bolts that hold
    it all together are galvanised steel, as on every TV aerial I have had
    or seen. Obviously the dissimilar metals will cause corrosion.
    I attempted to buy aluminium bolts but failed. I never got around to
    making some.
    I'll get Freview one day and throw the expensive aerial away.
    May I remind you that I am complaining about the stupid TV sound
    default, not the aerial.
     
    Matty F, Mar 18, 2011
    #4
  5. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 18, 8:31 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    > In message
    > <>, Matty F
    > wrote:
    >
    > > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    > > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    > > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.

    >
    > NICAM digital stereo is probably the most robust component of the NZ analog
    > TV signal (while Teletext is the least). In other words, it’s not likely to
    > give trouble until the picture has become close to unwatchable.


    The picture is near perfect. I believe the corrosion in the aerial is
    generating a spurious signal.
    A modern TV should handle a poor sound signal properly and just switch
    to mono.
     
    Matty F, Mar 18, 2011
    #5
  6. Matty F

    Greg Guest

    It's relatively simple, as the signal is poor it run in good old
    analogue mono audio, a small increase in signal now provides enough for
    the nicam to kick in, as it's a digital signal the TV switches to the
    digital signal audio processor, turning off the analogue audio, hence
    the drop out in sound, as the signal is still quite poor the nicam
    switches off and TV goes back to mono.

    Most TV's have a button something along the lines of I/II which selects
    the audio channel, try using that to select the mono signal.

    Or you can buy yourself a cheap satellite box, plug it in to your sky
    dish and get freeview that way, probably cheaper to buy the Satellite
    box than fix up the wiring/aerial for you analogue tv reception.



    On 18/03/2011 8:23 p.m., Richard wrote:
    > On 18/03/2011 7:38 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    >> Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    >> hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    >> one day.
    >>
    >> In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    >> picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    >> the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    >> I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    >> a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    >> But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    >> concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >>
    >> My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    >> every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    >> TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >>
    >> IF stereosound=crap
    >> THEN use mono
    >> END
    >>
    >> The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    >> of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    >> and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.
    >>
    >> So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    >> dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    >> and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    >> bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    >> the bar and carrying on.

    >
    > It may have autotuned it with the wrong audio offset for analog, the
    > nicam will still work but the analog audio will not. Go into the tuning
    > menu and check that it is on B/G and not I or one of the other ones.
    >
    > And they do, if I have no antenna in my TV here, I get mono sound, as
    > the antenna plug gets closer to the socket as the picture starts to
    > clear up the nicam will kick in and it changes to stereo
    >
    > What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    > needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    > F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.
     
    Greg, Mar 18, 2011
    #6
  7. On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:38:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F
    <> wrote:

    >Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    >hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    >one day.
    >
    >In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    >picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    >the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    >I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    >a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    >But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    >concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >
    >My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    >every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    >TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >
    >IF stereosound=crap
    >THEN use mono
    >END
    >
    >The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    >of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    >and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.
    >
    >So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    >dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    >and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    >bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    >the bar and carrying on.




    You might get rid of the Philips as they have closed down in this part
    of the World and the Service Agents Next Electronic has gone bankrupt.

    Seems to me that you are using Analog, it needs to have good reception
    with out ghosting to receive Nicam sound..
     
    William Brown, Mar 18, 2011
    #7
  8. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 18, 8:47 pm, Greg <> wrote:
    > It's relatively simple, as the signal is poor it run in good old
    > analogue mono audio, a small increase in signal now provides enough for
    > the nicam to kick in, as it's a digital signal the TV switches to the
    > digital signal audio processor, turning off the analogue audio, hence
    > the drop out in sound, as the signal is still quite poor the nicam
    > switches off and TV goes back to mono.
    >
    > Most TV's have a button something along the lines of I/II which selects
    > the audio channel, try using that to select the mono signal.


    There are many audio settings available. None of them allows the
    choice of mono sound.
    I meant to mention that this problem only occurs after many days of
    fine weather followed by rain.
    And while I could fix the damn aerial for the hundredth time, the TV
    should handle this better.
     
    Matty F, Mar 18, 2011
    #8
  9. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 18/03/2011 8:41 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > On Mar 18, 8:23 pm, Richard<> wrote:
    >
    >> What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    >> needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    >> F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.

    >
    > It's nothing to do with the cables of course.
    > The aerial consists of dozens of aluminium rods with aluminium
    > connectors that swap from side to side. The supplied bolts that hold
    > it all together are galvanised steel, as on every TV aerial I have had
    > or seen. Obviously the dissimilar metals will cause corrosion.
    > I attempted to buy aluminium bolts but failed. I never got around to
    > making some.
    > I'll get Freview one day and throw the expensive aerial away.
    > May I remind you that I am complaining about the stupid TV sound
    > default, not the aerial.


    If its so bad that the nicam is failing, then you either have bad
    multipathing, or else you have weak signal. In either case the picture
    is normally unwatchable before the nicam has problems so I am interested
    in how bad the picture you have is.

    Also, its a waste feeding a digital widescreen with an analog butchered
    signal.
     
    Richard, Mar 18, 2011
    #9
  10. Matty F

    Richard Guest

    On 18/03/2011 9:24 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > On Mar 18, 8:47 pm, Greg<> wrote:
    >> It's relatively simple, as the signal is poor it run in good old
    >> analogue mono audio, a small increase in signal now provides enough for
    >> the nicam to kick in, as it's a digital signal the TV switches to the
    >> digital signal audio processor, turning off the analogue audio, hence
    >> the drop out in sound, as the signal is still quite poor the nicam
    >> switches off and TV goes back to mono.
    >>
    >> Most TV's have a button something along the lines of I/II which selects
    >> the audio channel, try using that to select the mono signal.

    >
    > There are many audio settings available. None of them allows the
    > choice of mono sound.
    > I meant to mention that this problem only occurs after many days of
    > fine weather followed by rain.
    > And while I could fix the damn aerial for the hundredth time, the TV
    > should handle this better.


    All TVs I have here have an audio button to switch between nicam and
    mono. As I dont give the TV a crap signal I dont know if it will hold
    the mono setting on a channel by channel basis however.
     
    Richard, Mar 18, 2011
    #10
  11. In message
    <>, Matty F
    wrote:

    > On Mar 18, 8:31 pm, Lawrence D'Oliveiro <l...@geek-
    > central.gen.new_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >> In message
    >> <>,
    >> Matty F wrote:
    >>
    >> > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    >> > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    >> > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.

    >>
    >> NICAM digital stereo is probably the most robust component of the NZ
    >> analog TV signal (while Teletext is the least). In other words, it’s not
    >> likely to give trouble until the picture has become close to unwatchable.

    >
    > The picture is near perfect. I believe the corrosion in the aerial is
    > generating a spurious signal.


    I suspect a fault in the TV.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Mar 18, 2011
    #11
  12. Matty F

    PeeCee Guest

    On 18/03/2011 7:38 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    > hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    > one day.
    >
    > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    > I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    > a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    > But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    > concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >
    > My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    > every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    > TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >
    > IF stereosound=crap
    > THEN use mono
    > END
    >
    > The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.
    >
    > So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    > dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    > and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    > bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    > the bar and carrying on.





    My dad had similar problems with a Sony TV he bought.
    TV went back and forth to Sony who declared every time 'nothing wrong
    with the TV' must be a poor signal.
    He had an excellent signal (mV, ie way above the 200uV minimum required)
    but had the retailer come put in a new antenna anyway to no avail.

    Yet both the Retailer and his Tech both agreed 'on site' the sound would
    drop in and out making for a 'very' poor listening experience.

    The Retailers Tech tried everything he could in the manual to turn Nicam
    off and force it to mono, just like you would like to to.
    When asked for help Sony said 'can't be done' Sony knows best and it was
    all automatic, they knew what they were doing not the pb tech.

    As this was not that long before the infamous Sony root kit episode Sony
    was at their arrogant zenith and point blank refused in the end to do
    any thing about it.
    So the retailer 'traded' this less than 6 month old Sony on a Panasonic
    also with Nicam.

    Needless to say the Panasonic Nicam stereo worked flawlessly from day
    one, and still does even though it's now had 3 (family) homes.

    Based on that experience I would suggest it might be time to go buy that
    new Freeview tuner and forget about analog.

    Some setups are just 'dogs' and no amount of fiddling will over come the
    poor dynamic of the combination.

    (Philips and Sony have close technical links btw!)

    Best
    Paul.
     
    PeeCee, Mar 18, 2011
    #12
  13. Matty F

    peterwn Guest

    On Mar 18, 7:38 pm, Matty F <> wrote:
    > Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    > hardware and constant repeats,  I'll get around to getting Freeview
    > one day.
    >
    > In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    > picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    > the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    > I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    > a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    > But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    > concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >
    > My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    > every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    > TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >
    > IF stereosound=crap
    > THEN use mono
    > END
    >
    > The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.
    >
    > So, why have Philips (and probably most manufacturers) defaulted to
    > dropping the sound entirely rather than making an intelligent decision
    > and playing mono? It's almost as bad as a CD player that can't read a
    > bar so repeats it repeats it ad infinitum, instead of simply ignoring
    > the bar and carrying on.

    Just a thought - your new aerial may be delivering too much signal -
    have you tried an attenuator? Years ago I installed an outdoor aerial
    to try and beat ghosting and the signal was so strong it 'detuned' the
    set. A Radio Inspector plugged the aerial into his standard issue
    signal meter and it just about went off the dial. A 3db attenuator did
    the trick.
     
    peterwn, Mar 18, 2011
    #13
  14. Matty F

    victor Guest

    On 18/03/2011 8:41 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    > On Mar 18, 8:23 pm, Richard<> wrote:
    >
    >> What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    >> needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    >> F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.

    >
    > It's nothing to do with the cables of course.
    > The aerial consists of dozens of aluminium rods with aluminium
    > connectors that swap from side to side. The supplied bolts that hold
    > it all together are galvanised steel, as on every TV aerial I have had
    > or seen. Obviously the dissimilar metals will cause corrosion.
    > I attempted to buy aluminium bolts but failed. I never got around to
    > making some.
    > I'll get Freview one day and throw the expensive aerial away.
    > May I remind you that I am complaining about the stupid TV sound
    > default, not the aerial.


    It is surprising that you could find a new tv without a digital tuner
     
    victor, Mar 18, 2011
    #14
  15. On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 10:00:05 +1300, victor <> wrote:

    >On 18/03/2011 8:41 p.m., Matty F wrote:
    >> On Mar 18, 8:23 pm, Richard<> wrote:
    >>
    >>> What the hell joins do you have that need vaselining? Sounds like it
    >>> needs a complete recable with proper cable and compression or radial fit
    >>> F connectors with the oring in them to stop water.

    >>
    >> It's nothing to do with the cables of course.
    >> The aerial consists of dozens of aluminium rods with aluminium
    >> connectors that swap from side to side. The supplied bolts that hold
    >> it all together are galvanised steel, as on every TV aerial I have had
    >> or seen. Obviously the dissimilar metals will cause corrosion.
    >> I attempted to buy aluminium bolts but failed. I never got around to
    >> making some.
    >> I'll get Freview one day and throw the expensive aerial away.
    >> May I remind you that I am complaining about the stupid TV sound
    >> default, not the aerial.

    >
    >It is surprising that you could find a new tv without a digital tuner



    Yes the Warehouse sells stacks of them.
     
    William Brown, Mar 18, 2011
    #15
  16. Matty F

    Possible Guest

    On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:38:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F
    <> wrote:

    >Having cancelled Sky because of their abysmal service and unreliable
    >hardware and constant repeats, I'll get around to getting Freeview
    >one day.
    >
    >In the meantime I'm using a rather expensive aerial on the roof. The
    >picture is great but the sound drops out every few seconds, because
    >the stupid TV wants to give me stereo but can't.
    >I can plug a rabbits ear aerial in and get continuous mono sound with
    >a grainy picture, which is better than I get with the roof aerial.
    >But the rabbits ear gets me TV3 only, because of the three story
    >concrete monstrosity just built next door.
    >
    >My question is, why does my Phiilps LCD TV decide to drop the sound
    >every few seconds rather than just deciding to go mono entirely? The
    >TV' has got a computer in it hasn't it?
    >
    >IF stereosound=crap
    >THEN use mono
    >END
    >
    >The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    >of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    >and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.




    The Directors and Reflector do not need a electrical connection with the
    mast boom at all, you are confused, just the Antenna part and use
    Silicon Grease or RTV Silicone Rubber to totally seal it, Not Vaseline.


    The Philips LCD TV's have a problem with the sound that is fixed with a
    firmware upgrade, but they don't tell you about this and will charge you
    to fix it, I just double checked with my Boss about this as I remember
    some months back they were using a USB stick to fix this fault.

    So if your TV has a USB port this is used to do Firmware upgrades.
     
    Possible, Mar 19, 2011
    #16
  17. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 19, 7:26 pm, Possible <> wrote:
    > On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:38:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F


    > >The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > >of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > >and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.

    >
    > The Directors and Reflector do not need a electrical connection with the
    > mast boom at all, you are confused, just the Antenna part and use
    > Silicon Grease or RTV Silicone Rubber to totally seal it, Not Vaseline.


    No you are confused.
    As you will observe in this photo of the aerial in question:
    http://i53.tinypic.com/2ias7k0.jpg

    the wires are connected to twelve elements in series by aluminium
    strips that cross to the elements on the other side. That's at least
    12 connections that can and do corrode. Because of the constant
    movement in winds it is impossible to seal the joints. The aerial has
    to be taken down and taken apart for cleaning. That's not easy as it's
    10 metres up in the air.
     
    Matty F, Mar 20, 2011
    #17
  18. In message <d6bd3339-5f7e-4522-
    >, Matty F wrote:

    > As you will observe in this photo of the aerial in question:
    > http://i53.tinypic.com/2ias7k0.jpg
    >
    > the wires are connected to twelve elements in series by aluminium
    > strips that cross to the elements on the other side.


    That does not make any sense. The actual “antenna†is supposed to be a
    dipole element (a rod with the two halves bent double) that I cannot see in
    that picture. The parallel bars in front of it are called “directorsâ€, while
    the ones behind (no more than one, I believe) are called “reflectorsâ€. There
    is NO electrical connection between these and the dipole—they are there
    purely to improve the directionality and frequency selectivity of the
    antenna.

    Starting from here <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tv_antenna>, I found a good
    picture here <http://www.aerialsandtv.com/aerials.html>.

    OK, looking at this other link
    <http://www.electronics-tutorials.com/antennas/antenna-basics.htm>, it
    mentions that a dipole need not be folded, and shows a picture closer to
    yours. But still there should not be any kind of conductors connecting to
    the directors and reflectors.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Mar 20, 2011
    #18
  19. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 20, 6:07 pm, Bret <> wrote:
    > On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 22:17:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F wrote:
    > > On Mar 19, 7:26 pm, Possible <> wrote:
    > >> On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:38:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F

    >
    > >>>The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > >>>of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > >>>and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.

    >
    > >> The Directors and Reflector do not need a electrical connection with the
    > >> mast boom at all, you are confused, just the Antenna part and use
    > >> Silicon Grease or RTV Silicone Rubber to totally seal it, Not Vaseline.

    >
    > > No you are confused.
    > > As you will observe in this photo of the aerial in question:
    > >http://i53.tinypic.com/2ias7k0.jpg

    >
    > > the wires are connected to twelve elements in series by aluminium
    > > strips that cross to the elements on the other side. That's at least
    > > 12 connections that can and do corrode. Because of the constant
    > > movement in winds it is impossible to seal the joints. The aerial has
    > > to be taken down and taken apart for cleaning. That's not easy as it's
    > > 10 metres up in the air.

    >
    > Not sure about your particular design, but Roger is correct when he says
    > the reflector and director elements don't need an electrical
    > connection,they ar called parasitic elements.


    The fact is that the two wires from my aerial are connected in series
    via ten pieces of flat aluminium to the twelve elements that you can
    see.

    There's no point in my fixing it now since it will be chucked out when
    I get Freview.
     
    Matty F, Mar 20, 2011
    #19
  20. Matty F

    Matty F Guest

    On Mar 20, 7:02 pm, Tony <lizandtony at orcon dot net dot nz> wrote:
    > Matty F <> wrote:
    > >On Mar 20, 6:07 pm, Bret <> wrote:
    > >> On Sat, 19 Mar 2011 22:17:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F wrote:
    > >> > On Mar 19, 7:26 pm, Possible <> wrote:
    > >> >> On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 23:38:42 -0700 (PDT), Matty F

    >
    > >> >>>The aerial on the roof has problems with corrosion between the dozens
    > >> >>>of connections. I can fix it by taking it all apart every few months
    > >> >>>and putting Vaseline on the joints.But I'm bored with that.

    >
    > >> >> The Directors and Reflector do not need a electrical connection with the
    > >> >> mast boom at all, you are confused, just the Antenna part and use
    > >> >> Silicon Grease or RTV Silicone Rubber to totally seal it, Not Vaseline.

    >
    > >> > No you are confused.
    > >> > As you will observe in this photo of the aerial in question:
    > >> >http://i53.tinypic.com/2ias7k0.jpg

    >
    > >> > the wires are connected to twelve elements in series by aluminium
    > >> > strips that cross to the elements on the other side. That's at least
    > >> > 12 connections that can and do corrode. Because of the constant
    > >> > movement in winds it is impossible to seal the joints. The aerial has
    > >> > to be taken down and taken apart for cleaning. That's not easy as it's
    > >> > 10 metres up in the air.

    >
    > >> Not sure about your particular design, but Roger is correct when he says
    > >> the reflector and director elements don't need an electrical
    > >> connection,they ar called parasitic elements.

    >
    > >The fact is that the two wires from my aerial are connected in series
    > >via ten pieces of flat aluminium to the twelve elements that you can
    > >see.

    >
    > >There's no point in my fixing it now since it will be chucked out when
    > >I get Freview.

    >
    > In a previous life I studied Yagi and other aerial design. The fact that the
    > dipole has a physical metallic connection to the reflectors and directors is
    > completely irrelevant.


    There's a series connection all the way around. In theory it's a dead
    short. But it's not, because of corrosion.
    Perhaps you never saw an aerial like mine.
     
    Matty F, Mar 20, 2011
    #20
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