Why do rogue callers want to call the UK

Discussion in 'UK VOIP' started by Rob van der Putten, Oct 25, 2011.

  1. Rob van der Putten, Oct 25, 2011
    #1
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  2. Hi there


    alexd wrote:

    > Perhaps the numbers they're attempting to contact are under their control,
    > in order to verify that they've found a vulnerable system [I see something
    > similar in Apache logs from various web servers I look after]. And perhaps
    > throwaway UK DDIs are easier to get hold of than anything else.


    Wikipedia on DDI;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct_Dial-In#Sellers
    "UK Geographic DID numbers can be obtained for free, terminated over SIP
    and also generate a revenue for inbound traffic."
    That's almost a pink contract.


    Regards,
    Rob
    --
    Wim T. Schippers for president
    http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bestand:Universiteit_Twente_Verzonken_Torentje_van_Drienerlo.jpg
     
    Rob van der Putten, Oct 26, 2011
    #2
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  3. Rob van der Putten

    Graham. Guest

    On 26/10/2011 17:40, Rob van der Putten wrote:
    > Hi there
    >
    >
    > alexd wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps the numbers they're attempting to contact are under their
    >> control,
    >> in order to verify that they've found a vulnerable system [I see
    >> something
    >> similar in Apache logs from various web servers I look after]. And
    >> perhaps
    >> throwaway UK DDIs are easier to get hold of than anything else.

    >
    > Wikipedia on DDI;
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct_Dial-In#Sellers
    > "UK Geographic DID numbers can be obtained for free, terminated over SIP
    > and also generate a revenue for inbound traffic."
    > That's almost a pink contract.
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    > Rob


    I'm not sure how you can generate revenue by getting people to dial your
    UK *geographic* number, although I take your point that UK geo and NGNs
    seem to be more widely available than any other country.


    --

    Graham.

    %Profound_observation%
     
    Graham., Oct 26, 2011
    #3
  4. Rob van der Putten <> wrote in <4ea73720$0$1307$4all.nl>:

    > A bit of Analog style log processing;
    > http://www.sput.nl/asterisk/#req
    > Of you strip leading stuff like '00' and '011', you end up with numbers
    > like 442035199055 and 442035199098.


    I had a look at the attempts I logged on an asterisk server and while I did
    notice the attempts to reach UK numbers in a likewise pattern I can't find
    any attempts to reach the exact same numbers.

    Either there are a lot of attackers trying this or they select a UK number,
    give it a few tries and drop it immediately.

    For added fun I answer those calls, play a random 'this number is not in
    service' recording from somewhere around the world .. and I record the
    incoming and outgoing audio. Sofar this got me a recording of a lot of
    noise: http://idefix.net/~koos/newsitem.cgi/1311000729

    Koos

    --
    Koos van den Hout, PGP keyid DSS/1024 0xF0D7C263 via keyservers
    4all.nl IPv6: Think ::/0, act ::1.
    http://idefix.net/ Are you ready to switch to IPv6?
     
    Koos van den Hout, Nov 7, 2011
    #4
  5. Rob van der Putten

    Graham. Guest

    On 07/11/2011 09:21, Koos van den Hout wrote:
    > Rob van der Putten<> wrote in<4ea73720$0$1307$4all.nl>:
    >
    >> A bit of Analog style log processing;
    >> http://www.sput.nl/asterisk/#req
    >> Of you strip leading stuff like '00' and '011', you end up with numbers
    >> like 442035199055 and 442035199098.

    >
    > I had a look at the attempts I logged on an asterisk server and while I did
    > notice the attempts to reach UK numbers in a likewise pattern I can't find
    > any attempts to reach the exact same numbers.
    >
    > Either there are a lot of attackers trying this or they select a UK number,
    > give it a few tries and drop it immediately.
    >
    > For added fun I answer those calls, play a random 'this number is not in
    > service' recording from somewhere around the world .. and I record the
    > incoming and outgoing audio. Sofar this got me a recording of a lot of
    > noise: http://idefix.net/~koos/newsitem.cgi/1311000729
    >
    > Koos
    >

    It occurred to me some time ago how that would be a good tactic for
    insurance company's and the like to use.
    While the would be claimant is waiting for the call to be answered,
    (ringing tone rather than music-on-hold might work best), the call is
    recorded and reviewed later for evidence of fabricating a false story.


    --

    Graham.

    %Profound_observation%
     
    Graham., Nov 15, 2011
    #5
  6. Rob van der Putten

    Graham. Guest

    On 07/11/2011 10:38, Andy Burns wrote:
    > Koos van den Hout wrote:
    >
    >> Either there are a lot of attackers trying this or they select a UK
    >> number,
    >> give it a few tries and drop it immediately.
    >>
    >> For added fun I answer those calls, play a random 'this number is not in
    >> service' recording from somewhere around the world .. and I record the
    >> incoming and outgoing audio. Sofar this got me a recording of a lot of
    >> noise: http://idefix.net/~koos/newsitem.cgi/1311000729

    >
    > I just play them a blast of tri-tone followed by Alisson saying "Weasels
    > have eaten our phone system", I suppose recording their reactions to
    > that might be mildly interesting ...


    You are all welcome to use the famous "Grampa Stack" recording I have
    put here.



    --

    Graham.

    %Profound_observation%
     
    Graham., Nov 15, 2011
    #6
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