Who is #1 with a bullet?

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by richard, Dec 3, 2009.

  1. richard

    richard Guest

    http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/02/susan.boyle.album/index.html?eref=igoogle_cnn

    From the "boondocks" of the UK she was barely known outside of her little
    home town. Until a certain TV show came along. Of all things, an amateur
    show. One in which you could be booted off the stage in seconds. But not
    this gal.

    When Susan Boyle sings, you listen. Her personal goal was to sing for the
    Queen of England, which was the top prize of the show. The judges on the
    show, who were known to cancel your ticket on a whim, were totally stunned
    at this gal. As was the entire world. The news media picked up on the story
    and ran with it all the way.

    Behind the scenes, record companies were working to get her to sign. Sign
    she did. In one week alone, she alone had sold over 700,000 albums. The
    highest ever for a single performer. Let alone someone just starting off.

    Way back in the 60's, there was a misprint in the weekly top 40 charts.
    To indicate fast rising tunes and hot sellers, a simple "bullet" was
    printed beside the number. So everyone got a good chuckle because #1 means
    you're at the top. There was even a song written about it.

    Congrats to Susan Boyle.
    Hope the sales continue.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. richard

    richard Guest

    On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 18:58:29 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 17:38:51 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/02/susan.boyle.album/index.html?eref=igoogle_cnn
    >>
    >>From the "boondocks" of the UK

    >
    > boondocks:
    >
    > an uninhabited area with thick natural vegetation,
    >
    > Maybe you need to look up boondocks.
    >
    > And perhaps uninhabited.


    Your brain, like the glass of water, is always half empty.
    All you ever do is find something negative to expand upon.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #2
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  3. richard

    Mex Guest

    "richard" wrote

    > Way back in the 60's, there was a misprint in the weekly top 40 charts.
    > To indicate fast rising tunes and hot sellers, a simple "bullet" was
    > printed beside the number. So everyone got a good chuckle because #1 means
    > you're at the top. There was even a song written about it.


    At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead of
    the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but what
    you said doesn't make too much sense . . .
     
    Mex, Dec 3, 2009
    #3
  4. richard

    OldGringo38 Guest

    In The Beginning God Created The Heavens And Earth, Then I Added My
    Two Cents To The Evan Platt Post:
    > On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 21:50:25 -0600, OldGringo38
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> Why did we all know that already?

    >
    > RtS points out old news stories that just about everyone already
    > knows.
    >
    > Next thing you know, he'll tell us about this guy named Neil Armstrong
    > and some phrase....

    LMAO Good laugh to end the day.

    --
    Old Gringo
    Just West Of Nowhere
    Enjoy Life And Live It To Its Fullest
    http://www.NuBoy-Industries.com
     
    OldGringo38, Dec 3, 2009
    #4
  5. richard

    richard Guest

    On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 19:17:43 -0800, Mex wrote:

    > "richard" wrote
    >
    >> Way back in the 60's, there was a misprint in the weekly top 40 charts.
    >> To indicate fast rising tunes and hot sellers, a simple "bullet" was
    >> printed beside the number. So everyone got a good chuckle because #1 means
    >> you're at the top. There was even a song written about it.

    >
    > At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead of
    > the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but what
    > you said doesn't make too much sense . . .


    "Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    "bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a bullett.
    #1 NEVER got a bullett.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #5
  6. richard

    Mex Guest

    "richard" <> wrote in message
    news:dhbrydcjut5v.ej3s936fe35e$...
    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 19:17:43 -0800, Mex wrote:
    >
    >> "richard" wrote
    >>
    >>> Way back in the 60's, there was a misprint in the weekly top 40 charts.
    >>> To indicate fast rising tunes and hot sellers, a simple "bullet" was
    >>> printed beside the number. So everyone got a good chuckle because #1
    >>> means
    >>> you're at the top. There was even a song written about it.

    >>
    >> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead
    >> of
    >> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >> what
    >> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .

    >
    > "Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    > Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    > weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    > "bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    > bullett.
    > #1 NEVER got a bullett.


    thanks
     
    Mex, Dec 3, 2009
    #6
  7. richard

    alan Guest

    "Evan Platt" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead
    >>> of
    >>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >>> what
    >>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .

    >>
    >>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    >>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    >>bullett.
    >>#1 NEVER got a bullett.

    >
    > OK, so what was the misprint?


    I think richard mode of expression (to be charitable) is kind of
    "impressionistic" --- he's got a picture inside his head and he thinks
    everyone sees the same picture and that it's therefore ok to leave out
    important pieces of information . . . not that the info was in any way
    important even in its entirety . . .
     
    alan, Dec 3, 2009
    #7
  8. richard

    richard Guest

    On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 20:57:56 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:

    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >
    >>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead of
    >>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but what
    >>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .

    >>
    >>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    >>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a bullett.
    >>#1 NEVER got a bullett.

    >
    > OK, so what was the misprint?


    Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny mind
    comprehend that?
    Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now that
    use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #8
  9. richard

    alan Guest

    "richard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 20:57:56 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead
    >>>> of
    >>>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >>>> what
    >>>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .
    >>>
    >>>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    >>>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    >>>bullett.
    >>>#1 NEVER got a bullett.

    >>
    >> OK, so what was the misprint?

    >
    > Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    > The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny mind
    > comprehend that?
    > Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    > I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now that
    > use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.


    It's not that anyone's dumb, richard. It's just that you don't know how to
    express yourself very well. You never specifically mentioned that the
    misprint was a bullet placed next to #1. You may THINK you're being clear,
    but you're usually just adding mud to the already murky water . . .
     
    alan, Dec 3, 2009
    #9
  10. richard

    richard Guest

    On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 23:28:50 -0800, alan wrote:

    > "richard" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 20:57:56 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet instead
    >>>>> of
    >>>>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >>>>> what
    >>>>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .
    >>>>
    >>>>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by artists.
    >>>>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>>>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>>>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    >>>>bullett.
    >>>>#1 NEVER got a bullett.
    >>>
    >>> OK, so what was the misprint?

    >>
    >> Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    >> The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny mind
    >> comprehend that?
    >> Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    >> I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now that
    >> use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.

    >
    > It's not that anyone's dumb, richard. It's just that you don't know how to
    > express yourself very well. You never specifically mentioned that the
    > misprint was a bullet placed next to #1. You may THINK you're being clear,
    > but you're usually just adding mud to the already murky water . . .


    Obviously you are rather young and have no clues about the 60's other than
    what you see on tv. As there was no internet then, radio stations relied on
    the weekly charts provided by cashbox and billboard magazines. In the
    printing of the charts, the coveted bullet, came to mean your song was
    moving well. Once you got to #1, where else can you go? If you can't
    understand a simple fact as I stated it, then I can't get make it any more
    clear.

    If I said, "black is a color", you'd ask, "Which one?"
    Evan has to reply to my posts to try and prove he is totally superior in
    every way. If he can't find fault, he has to create some meaningless
    garbage just to be mouthing off.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #10
  11. richard

    alan Guest

    "richard" <> wrote in message
    news:f1w3d8j40wd0$.10v8qys6t8ppr$...
    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 23:28:50 -0800, alan wrote:
    >
    >> "richard" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 20:57:56 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet
    >>>>>> instead
    >>>>>> of
    >>>>>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >>>>>> what
    >>>>>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .
    >>>>>
    >>>>>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by
    >>>>>artists.
    >>>>>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>>>>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>>>>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    >>>>>bullett.
    >>>>>#1 NEVER got a bullett.
    >>>>
    >>>> OK, so what was the misprint?
    >>>
    >>> Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    >>> The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny
    >>> mind
    >>> comprehend that?
    >>> Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    >>> I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now
    >>> that
    >>> use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.

    >>
    >> It's not that anyone's dumb, richard. It's just that you don't know how
    >> to
    >> express yourself very well. You never specifically mentioned that the
    >> misprint was a bullet placed next to #1. You may THINK you're being
    >> clear,
    >> but you're usually just adding mud to the already murky water . . .

    >
    > Obviously you are rather young and have no clues about the 60's other than
    > what you see on tv. As there was no internet then, radio stations relied
    > on
    > the weekly charts provided by cashbox and billboard magazines. In the
    > printing of the charts, the coveted bullet, came to mean your song was
    > moving well. Once you got to #1, where else can you go? If you can't
    > understand a simple fact as I stated it, then I can't get make it any more
    > clear.


    You're just proving my point ---- you're assuming that everyone has had the
    same experiences and interests that you've had and that you therefore do not
    have to be clear in what you're communicating.
    I'm probably even older than you are, but guess what? I was in high school
    in the mid- 60s and never fucking read billboard magazine, didn't give a
    shit who or what was #1 or who had "bullets" by their songs. You make a
    mistake in assuming that everyone had the same mindless fascination with
    popular music that you apparently had, and you end up failing to
    communicate.
     
    alan, Dec 3, 2009
    #11
  12. richard

    richard Guest

    On Thu, 3 Dec 2009 00:22:27 -0800, alan wrote:

    > "richard" <> wrote in message
    > news:f1w3d8j40wd0$.10v8qys6t8ppr$...
    >> On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 23:28:50 -0800, alan wrote:
    >>
    >>> "richard" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>> On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 20:57:56 -0800, Evan Platt wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 21:46:13 -0700, richard <> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> At the risk of appearing dense, what was the misprint? A bullet
    >>>>>>> instead
    >>>>>>> of
    >>>>>>> the #? or vice versa? Or the number itself ? Maybe it's just me, but
    >>>>>>> what
    >>>>>>> you said doesn't make too much sense . . .
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>"Billboard magazine" was the main source for reports of sales by
    >>>>>>artists.
    >>>>>>Radio stations played the "Top 40". When an artist's sales shoved their
    >>>>>>weekly number up several notches, the ranking number was followed by a
    >>>>>>"bullet". It was really rare to see anything in the top 5 to get a
    >>>>>>bullett.
    >>>>>>#1 NEVER got a bullett.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> OK, so what was the misprint?
    >>>>
    >>>> Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    >>>> The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny
    >>>> mind
    >>>> comprehend that?
    >>>> Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    >>>> I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now
    >>>> that
    >>>> use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.
    >>>
    >>> It's not that anyone's dumb, richard. It's just that you don't know how
    >>> to
    >>> express yourself very well. You never specifically mentioned that the
    >>> misprint was a bullet placed next to #1. You may THINK you're being
    >>> clear,
    >>> but you're usually just adding mud to the already murky water . . .

    >>
    >> Obviously you are rather young and have no clues about the 60's other than
    >> what you see on tv. As there was no internet then, radio stations relied
    >> on
    >> the weekly charts provided by cashbox and billboard magazines. In the
    >> printing of the charts, the coveted bullet, came to mean your song was
    >> moving well. Once you got to #1, where else can you go? If you can't
    >> understand a simple fact as I stated it, then I can't get make it any more
    >> clear.

    >
    > You're just proving my point ---- you're assuming that everyone has had the
    > same experiences and interests that you've had and that you therefore do not
    > have to be clear in what you're communicating.
    > I'm probably even older than you are, but guess what? I was in high school
    > in the mid- 60s and never fucking read billboard magazine, didn't give a
    > shit who or what was #1 or who had "bullets" by their songs. You make a
    > mistake in assuming that everyone had the same mindless fascination with
    > popular music that you apparently had, and you end up failing to
    > communicate.


    So that's now my problem?
    If you don't understand the situation, don't come around chewing ass off
    because of that.
     
    richard, Dec 3, 2009
    #12
  13. richard

    Oldus Fartus Guest

    little dicky bullis wrote:

    >
    > Are you really that brain dead? I believe so.
    > The #1 seller NEVER NEVER NEVER got the bullett. Can your feeble tiny mind
    > comprehend that?
    > Now the phrase has come to mean something more than just a joke.
    > I have tried looking up the incident but there are so many things now that
    > use the phrase that makes it damned difficult.


    FFS Bullis, the term has been around as long as I can remember, and the
    bullet simply means the song/album has either moved rapidly in the
    charts, or has/is dominating.

    To confuse you further, in some books or charts, the bullet means
    something different. A round bullet meant the track/album reached
    Gold, and a triangular meant Platinum.

    --
    Cheers
    Oldus Fartus
     
    Oldus Fartus, Dec 3, 2009
    #13
  14. Evan Platt wrote:

    > richard <> wrote:
    >> #1 NEVER got a bullett.

    >
    > OK, so what was the misprint?


    "bullett" ...

    --
    -bts
    -Friends don't let friends drive Windows
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Dec 3, 2009
    #14
  15. richard

    XS11E Guest

    Evan Platt <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 2 Dec 2009 17:38:51 -0700, richard <>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/02/susan.boyle.album/index
    >>.html?eref=igoogle_cnn
    >>
    >>From the "boondocks" of the UK

    >
    > boondocks:
    >
    > an uninhabited area with thick natural vegetation,
    >
    > Maybe you need to look up boondocks.


    Maybe you need to look up boondocks?

    Webster says:

    Main Entry: boon·docks
    Pronunciation: \'bün-?däks\
    Function: noun plural
    Etymology: Tagalog bundok mountain
    Date: 1930
    1 : rough country filled with dense brush
    2 : a rural area : sticks

    The expression is most commonly used to mean definition 2.


    --
    XS11E, Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://twovoyagers.com/improve-usenet.org/
     
    XS11E, Dec 3, 2009
    #15
  16. richard

    Mr Pounder Guest

    10 cc


    "richard" <> wrote in message
    news:wsqshw8h2816$.10we4n7e7jli0$...
    > http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/02/susan.boyle.album/index.html?eref=igoogle_cnn
    >
    > From the "boondocks" of the UK she was barely known outside of her little
    > home town. Until a certain TV show came along. Of all things, an amateur
    > show. One in which you could be booted off the stage in seconds. But not
    > this gal.
    >
    > When Susan Boyle sings, you listen. Her personal goal was to sing for the
    > Queen of England, which was the top prize of the show. The judges on the
    > show, who were known to cancel your ticket on a whim, were totally stunned
    > at this gal. As was the entire world. The news media picked up on the
    > story
    > and ran with it all the way.
    >
    > Behind the scenes, record companies were working to get her to sign. Sign
    > she did. In one week alone, she alone had sold over 700,000 albums. The
    > highest ever for a single performer. Let alone someone just starting off.
    >
    > Way back in the 60's, there was a misprint in the weekly top 40 charts.
    > To indicate fast rising tunes and hot sellers, a simple "bullet" was
    > printed beside the number. So everyone got a good chuckle because #1 means
    > you're at the top. There was even a song written about it.
    >
    > Congrats to Susan Boyle.
    > Hope the sales continue.
     
    Mr Pounder, Dec 5, 2009
    #16
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