Who finds I.T. boring?

Discussion in 'Microsoft Certification' started by pwalker, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. pwalker

    pwalker Guest

    I do.

    Peter Walker.
    MCSE+I, MCDBA, MCITP, CCNP, CCDP, OCA, CCA
    pwalker, Oct 31, 2007
    #1
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  2. Perhaps the key there, then, is to turn it into something you do enjoy. Have
    a creative streak? Work the design side of everything. Your cert tracks
    definitely indicate an architecture direction to your certification path. I
    dont know anything about you or your background but if you are more than a
    decade in, you may be a little too deep to really want to consider giving up
    your "sweat equity" in the industry to try something else.

    Perhaps consider going after a challenge in management by building your
    skills in management and leadership subjects and then formalizing that with
    business or HR related certification.
    --
    Wayne Anderson
    http://blog.avanadeadvisor.com/blogs/waynea/


    "pwalker" wrote:

    > I do.
    >
    > Peter Walker.
    > MCSE+I, MCDBA, MCITP, CCNP, CCDP, OCA, CCA
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?V2F5bmUgQW5kZXJzb24=?=, Nov 1, 2007
    #2
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  3. pwalker

    pwalker Guest

    Thanks for the insight Wayne, I really appreciate it. I apologise for my
    short and terse "I do". I did not expect to receive a sound response as
    yours.

    Actually, I started out as a programmer, then moved across to networking,
    and then migrated into working with databases. I have found that this has
    given me the best of both worlds as my current role encompasses a fair
    amount of SQL administrative/networking work, combined with a large amount
    of SQL design/programming work. It's a nice architect role which has given
    me a fair amount of reward, especially the BI work I have been doing.

    You are quite right. I am more than a decade in. With a background in
    electrical engineering/mathematics, and now having completed a master of
    science in computer science, I feel all dried up IT-wise. There is a lack of
    enthusiasm being displayed from within. I'm unsure what really excites me in
    IT anymore! I have considered a management role, as many would see that as
    the next logical step in my career path, but then again it's not "me" for
    some reason.

    As a result of all these feelings I decided to sit the medical school
    entrance exam and managed to gain a spot for next year. Medicine has always
    fascinated me. So I am currently weighing up whether to throw away 10+ years
    of IT experience and start medical school in my 30's, or just try and find
    something else within IT that excites me.

    I have considered moving across to another industry and continue my SQL
    role. I have a fair amount of experience trading shares, options and
    futures; so maybe doing IT work in the financial industry might get me
    revved up again - I don't know.

    I'm very interested in knowing whether others have gone through similar
    experiences, and how they have fared. Maybe what I am really going through
    is a midlife crisis : )

    Many thanks

    Peter.


    "Wayne Anderson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Perhaps the key there, then, is to turn it into something you do enjoy.
    > Have
    > a creative streak? Work the design side of everything. Your cert tracks
    > definitely indicate an architecture direction to your certification path.
    > I
    > dont know anything about you or your background but if you are more than a
    > decade in, you may be a little too deep to really want to consider giving
    > up
    > your "sweat equity" in the industry to try something else.
    >
    > Perhaps consider going after a challenge in management by building your
    > skills in management and leadership subjects and then formalizing that
    > with
    > business or HR related certification.
    > --
    > Wayne Anderson
    > http://blog.avanadeadvisor.com/blogs/waynea/
    >
    >
    > "pwalker" wrote:
    >
    >> I do.
    >>
    >> Peter Walker.
    >> MCSE+I, MCDBA, MCITP, CCNP, CCDP, OCA, CCA
    >>
    >>
    >>
    pwalker, Nov 4, 2007
    #3
  4. pwalker

    J.Tavish Guest

    Yep, I'm bored too.

    I think actually it's quite normal to get bored with something you have
    become very competent in after so many years. The only way around that is to
    make it more fun, or move on to something else - there are no other choices.
    I have 15 years of "sweat equity" - lol - in IT. However, you can't go back
    and start again in most people's financial position, as it is a huge drop in
    wages to do so.

    I am going to get some money stashed away somewhere the banks don't know
    about and then get a business loan and start up on my own. This will give me
    new challenges and enable me to do exactly what I want to do. This may seem
    risky until you remember that you got bored because you know the job so well,
    and you probably have plenty of contacts too, so it can be easier than you
    think - most IT people are smarter than the average Joe. A tried and tested
    option here is to latch on to a new MS technology and become a startup
    company specialising in that area with MS partner status - then sell the
    company as soon as the order books look good and do it over again. Another
    option is of course contracting, where you can move on to a new job if the
    current one does not suit and take a few months off here and there to do your
    own thing. So there are a few things you can do to shake things up in your
    IT relationship before the "10 year itch" makes you take a new mistress.

    Re: the medical thing - this probably came up in your training/interviews
    already, but you should consider that medicine is more of a calling than a
    job. You will at times have to work very long hours, and you will have to
    deal with death and grieving relatives almost daily. You will frequently have
    to put others before yourself as people's lives really will depend on you. In
    IT if you code something wrong, or turn up late or even drunk, then it might
    not do your career any good, but no one dies. Medicine is about looking after
    others, most other careers are about looking after number one.

    Probably doesn't help much, but there's no way your the only one. It's
    probably 50% of people in IT more than 10 years tbh. I wanted to be a racing
    driver when I was growing up, but now I have to settle for being an amateur -
    on the plus side, IT pays the crash bills.
    J.Tavish, Feb 25, 2008
    #4
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