While-U-Wait sensor clean in NYC?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Mike Ross, Mar 26, 2007.

  1. Mike Ross

    Mike Ross Guest

    Can anyone recommend somewhere that offers a While-U-Wait (or at least
    fast turnaround) sensor cleaning service in or near NYC? Have a Kodak
    DCS Pro SLR/n that's full of little hairs...

    Lower Westchester would be even better than NYC if there is anywhere
    there...

    Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:

    http://www.corestore.org/l2.jpg

    for an example. What a mess!

    Thanks

    Mike
    --
    http://www.corestore.org
    'As I walk along these shores
    I am the history within'
     
    Mike Ross, Mar 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mike Ross

    Ben Miller Guest

    On Mar 26, 8:43 am, Mike Ross <> wrote:
    > Can anyone recommend somewhere that offers a While-U-Wait (or at least
    > fast turnaround) sensor cleaning service in or near NYC? Have a Kodak
    > DCS Pro SLR/n that's full of little hairs...
    >
    > Lower Westchester would be even better than NYC if there is anywhere
    > there...
    >
    > Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    > have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:
    >
    > http://www.corestore.org/l2.jpg
    >
    > for an example. What a mess!


    A huge mess indeed! Anyway, w/ Photoshop, selective use of the
    healing brush tool (the Band Aid icon in the tools pallette) will help
    clear that rat's nest up.

    Also, and I'm going to pick up a lot of flack here, but instead of
    paying to have the camera cleaned, just put it in mirror lock up and
    *gently* blow some compressed air on the _high pass filter_ cause
    that's where the offending particulate is. You are not cleaning the
    actual sensor, and neither is anyone else. I would practice blowing
    some dust off of your desk, window, whatever. It doesn't take much
    pressure at all - and you don't want the propellant jetting out. I've
    been using 3M Dust Remover Compressed Gas Duster for a long time now,
    and have had complete success. I use that brand because it seems to
    have a much lower propulsion rate than others, like the Office Depot
    brand.

    How to:

    Remove lens, put camera in mirror lock up mode , hold the camera at a
    45* angle w/ the lens mount facing down (you might even put it on a
    tripod ball head your first go-round), and just gently blow the
    filter. You'll be able to see the offending particulate before you
    spray. With the right light, you can eyeball the results before you
    put the lens back on to test. After the first pass or once you can't
    see any more squigglies, put the lens on and shoot at a clear sky with
    a high number f/stop. If there are still issues, repeat until they
    are gone.

    But the bottom line here is that I only have to use the stuff *maybe*
    once a year, and I change lenses constantly. I have had my D2X,
    second camera, for eight or nine months and have yet to see a speck.
    Learn how to change lenses correctly, and this pube problem you have
    will all but vanish. When changing lenses, hold the lens mount
    facing, and parallel to, the ground and attach the lens - do it as
    quickly as possible. Try and do it indoors if possible. If no lens
    is in place, keep the mount covered (duh)...etc.
     
    Ben Miller, Mar 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. Mike Ross

    Cynicor Guest

    Ben Miller wrote:
    > On Mar 26, 8:43 am, Mike Ross <> wrote:
    >> Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    >> have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:
    >>
    >> http://www.corestore.org/l2.jpg
    >>
    >> for an example. What a mess!

    >
    > A huge mess indeed! Anyway, w/ Photoshop, selective use of the
    > healing brush tool (the Band Aid icon in the tools pallette) will help
    > clear that rat's nest up.
    >
    > Also, and I'm going to pick up a lot of flack here, but instead of
    > paying to have the camera cleaned, just put it in mirror lock up and
    > *gently* blow some compressed air on the _high pass filter_ cause
    > that's where the offending particulate is.


    Don't use compressed air. Use a blower bulb. I use a Giotto Rocket and
    it's always worked great.
     
    Cynicor, Mar 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Mike Ross

    Ben Miller Guest

    On Mar 26, 9:44 am, Cynicor <> wrote:

    > Don't use compressed air. Use a blower bulb. I use a Giotto Rocket and
    > it's always worked great.- Hide quoted text -


    Never worked for me. I'll stick with the can.
     
    Ben Miller, Mar 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Mike Ross

    Recycle THIS Guest

    "Mike Ross" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    > have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:


    You've got mail!
     
    Recycle THIS, Mar 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Mike Ross

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Ben Miller wrote:

    > On Mar 26, 9:44 am, Cynicor <> wrote:
    >
    >> Don't use compressed air. Use a blower bulb. I use a Giotto Rocket and
    >> it's always worked great.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > Never worked for me. I'll stick with the can.


    Have you used an actual Giotto Rocket Blower, or just some
    rubber bulb you can buy at any camera store?

    The Giotto produces more pressure than the average bulb
    It can be equal to the pressure of canned air.

    Canned air works, but is prone to spitting out bits of propellant
    that can leave marks on sensors and cause more problems. This
    is especially true if the can is full and you don't hold it
    straight up and down.
     
    Jim Townsend, Mar 26, 2007
    #6
  7. "Mike Ross" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > Can anyone recommend somewhere that offers a While-U-Wait (or at least
    > fast turnaround) sensor cleaning service in or near NYC? Have a Kodak
    > DCS Pro SLR/n that's full of little hairs...
    >
    > Lower Westchester would be even better than NYC if there is anywhere
    > there...
    >
    > Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    > have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:
    >
    > http://www.corestore.org/l2.jpg
    >
    > for an example. What a mess!


    That looks nasty! I notice that it's shot at f22 which will make any dust
    look really bad, and I would stick with f8 for this kind of shot.

    I bet that a couple of blasts with a giotto rocket blower would remove most
    of this rubbish. I used a "FlexiSwab" to clear a couple of specks from my
    sensor that the rocket would not shift, but this works best with specks you
    can actually see when looking at the sensor. I think learning to clean a
    sensor is a good skill to master. A good site on sensor cleaning methods:
    http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/index.html

    I wonder how you managed to get so much "hair" type of dust on the sensor.

    Cheers adrian www.boliston.co.uk
     
    Adrian Boliston, Mar 26, 2007
    #7
  8. Mike Ross wrote

    > Also, any tips on removing the hairs from images using Photoshop? I
    > have a bunch of ruined shots from a Scotland trip, see:


    <sigh>

    Looks like you'll just have to go back and take some more,
    Mike :-D

    Chris
     
    Chris Gilbert, Mar 26, 2007
    #8
  9. Mike Ross

    Mardon Guest

    Cynicor <> wrote:

    > Don't use compressed air. Use a blower bulb. I use a Giotto Rocket and
    > it's always worked great.


    I bought a Giotto brand Q.ball Rocket Blower. I agree with Ben. I've
    found the Rocket Blower to be pretty much useless. If I had as much junk
    as Mike does, I'd blow it first but I'm certain I'd still have to clean the
    sensor using the Copperhill Method. Here's an example of my sensor
    cleaning:
    http://www.JustPhotos.ca/misc/sensor.htm
     
    Mardon, Mar 27, 2007
    #9
  10. Mike Ross

    Ben Miller Guest

    On Mar 26, 7:43 pm, Mardon <> wrote:
    > Cynicor <> wrote:
    > > Don't use compressed air. Use a blower bulb. I use a Giotto Rocket and
    > > it's always worked great.

    >
    > I bought a Giotto brand Q.ball Rocket Blower. I agree with Ben. I've
    > found the Rocket Blower to be pretty much useless. If I had as much junk
    > as Mike does, I'd blow it first but I'm certain I'd still have to clean the
    > sensor using the Copperhill Method. Here's an example of my sensor
    > cleaning:http://www.JustPhotos.ca/misc/sensor.htm


    Again, I use the air as I find Pec Pads/Sensor Swipes way too invasive
    and time consuming - prepare a swab, cut a pad, hope you have the
    right amount of Eclipse, stop hand from shaking long enough to make a
    pass or two - ****, streaks!!
    With compressed air, it's over in 20 seconds. Mirror lock up, remove
    lens, carefully blow air, replace lens. Done.
    Though I do feel the swabs are more effective than the bulbs.
     
    Ben Miller, Mar 27, 2007
    #10
  11. Mike Ross

    timeOday Guest

    Adrian Boliston wrote:

    > That looks nasty! I notice that it's shot at f22 which will make any dust
    > look really bad, and I would stick with f8 for this kind of shot


    Holding the camera level usually helps, too.
     
    timeOday, Mar 30, 2007
    #11
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