Which UV filter brand?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mianileng, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya, Marumi
    and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own experience,
    which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to image
    quality? TIA.
     
    mianileng, Mar 13, 2012
    #1
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  2. mianileng

    Bruce Guest

    "mianileng" <> wrote:

    >I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya, Marumi
    >and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own experience,
    >which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to image
    >quality? TIA.



    Of those listed, Hoya. But if you want a top quality UV filter, look
    at B+W or Heliopan which are optically only a little better than Hoya
    but are many times easier to keep clean.

    In all cases look for the latest multi-coated filters that are sold
    specifically for use with digital cameras. Hoya has "Pro1 Digital"
    and B+W has "F-Pro", "F-Pro Gold" and "XS-Pro".

    As the cost of these filters is high compared to the price of your
    camera, you may wish to consider whether you need one at all. If you
    still want one, but the expensive ranges are outside your budget, the
    Nikon NC range is a cheaper alternative but still offers excellent
    optical quality.
     
    Bruce, Mar 13, 2012
    #2
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  3. mianileng

    nospam Guest

    In article <jjo0tg$mh5$>, mianileng
    <> wrote:

    > I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    > FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    > have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya, Marumi
    > and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own experience,
    > which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to image
    > quality? TIA.


    the important thing is that it's multi-coated. you don't want a cheap
    uncoated filter.

    hoya smc is probably the best bet, but there are others.
     
    nospam, Mar 13, 2012
    #3
  4. "mianileng" <> writes:

    > I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    > FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    > have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya, Marumi
    > and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own experience,
    > which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to image
    > quality? TIA.


    I'm not sure it matters, but Hoya is the major brand out of that set.

    The thing to make sure of is that it's multi-coated.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, ; http://dd-b.net/
    Snapshots: http://dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/data/
    Photos: http://dd-b.net/photography/gallery/
    Dragaera: http://dragaera.info
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Mar 13, 2012
    #4
  5. mianileng

    Alex Monro Guest

    mianileng wrote:

    > I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    > FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    > have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya, Marumi
    > and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own experience,
    > which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to image
    > quality? TIA.


    You might find this multi test of UV filters at Lenstip.com helpful:

    http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html

    There's also a follow up:

    http://www.lenstip.com/120.1-article-UV_filters_test_-_supplement.html
    --
    Alex Monro
    Exeter, UK
    Running on Linux (Kubuntu 10.04)
     
    Alex Monro, Mar 14, 2012
    #5
  6. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    Bruce wrote:
    > "mianileng" <> wrote:
    >
    >> I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >> FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >> have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya,
    >> Marumi
    >> and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own
    >> experience,
    >> which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to
    >> image
    >> quality? TIA.

    >
    >
    > Of those listed, Hoya. But if you want a top quality UV
    > filter, look
    > at B+W or Heliopan which are optically only a little better
    > than Hoya
    > but are many times easier to keep clean.
    >
    > In all cases look for the latest multi-coated filters that are
    > sold
    > specifically for use with digital cameras. Hoya has "Pro1
    > Digital"
    > and B+W has "F-Pro", "F-Pro Gold" and "XS-Pro".
    >
    > As the cost of these filters is high compared to the price of
    > your
    > camera, you may wish to consider whether you need one at all.


    My main reason for wanting to fit a UV filter is to protect the
    lens. I live in a region where most of the soil is fine clay and
    dust quickly settles on any exposed surface, especially in the
    dry season.

    If you
    > still want one, but the expensive ranges are outside your
    > budget, the
    > Nikon NC range is a cheaper alternative but still offers
    > excellent
    > optical quality.


    I haven't found a source for any of the others you mentioned. I
    live in a remote part of India and my choices are limited to
    what's available online, and _that_ range is very limited because
    online shopping still has a long way to go here.
     
    mianileng, Mar 14, 2012
    #6
  7. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    nospam wrote:
    > In article <jjo0tg$mh5$>, mianileng
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >> FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >> have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya,
    >> Marumi
    >> and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own
    >> experience,
    >> which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to
    >> image
    >> quality? TIA.

    >
    > the important thing is that it's multi-coated. you don't want a
    > cheap
    > uncoated filter.
    >
    > hoya smc is probably the best bet, but there are others.


    The ones I've looked at all claim to be multi-coated, with prices
    ranging from the equivalent of about US $6 for an Osaka to $18
    for a Hoya HMC (not SMC).
     
    mianileng, Mar 14, 2012
    #7
  8. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    Alex Monro wrote:
    > mianileng wrote:
    >
    >> I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >> FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >> have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya,
    >> Marumi
    >> and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own
    >> experience,
    >> which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to
    >> image
    >> quality? TIA.

    >
    > You might find this multi test of UV filters at Lenstip.com
    > helpful:
    >
    > http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html
    >
    > There's also a follow up:
    >
    > http://www.lenstip.com/120.1-article-UV_filters_test_-_supplement.html


    Thanks for the links. I jumped to the summary and will read the
    rest later.
     
    mianileng, Mar 14, 2012
    #8
  9. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    David Dyer-Bennet wrote:
    > "mianileng" <> writes:
    >
    >> I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >> FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >> have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya,
    >> Marumi
    >> and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own
    >> experience,
    >> which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to
    >> image
    >> quality? TIA.

    >
    > I'm not sure it matters, but Hoya is the major brand out of
    > that set.
    >
    > The thing to make sure of is that it's multi-coated.


    The ones I'm looking at all claim to be multi-coated.
     
    mianileng, Mar 14, 2012
    #9
  10. David J Taylor, Mar 14, 2012
    #10
  11. mianileng

    Bruce Guest

    "mianileng" <> wrote:
    >Bruce wrote:
    >> "mianileng" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I want to get a 52mm UV filter to protect the lens on my new
    >>> FZ150, and since the local camera shop doesn't have any, I'll
    >>> have to order one online. I have a choice of Kenko, Hoya,
    >>> Marumi
    >>> and Osaka. Based on their reputation or on your own
    >>> experience,
    >>> which of these is likely to cause the least degradation to
    >>> image
    >>> quality? TIA.

    >>
    >>
    >> Of those listed, Hoya. But if you want a top quality UV
    >> filter, look
    >> at B+W or Heliopan which are optically only a little better
    >> than Hoya
    >> but are many times easier to keep clean.
    >>
    >> In all cases look for the latest multi-coated filters that are
    >> sold
    >> specifically for use with digital cameras. Hoya has "Pro1
    >> Digital"
    >> and B+W has "F-Pro", "F-Pro Gold" and "XS-Pro".
    >>
    >> As the cost of these filters is high compared to the price of
    >> your
    >> camera, you may wish to consider whether you need one at all.

    >
    >My main reason for wanting to fit a UV filter is to protect the
    >lens. I live in a region where most of the soil is fine clay and
    >dust quickly settles on any exposed surface, especially in the
    >dry season.
    >
    > If you
    >> still want one, but the expensive ranges are outside your
    >> budget, the
    >> Nikon NC range is a cheaper alternative but still offers
    >> excellent
    >> optical quality.

    >
    >I haven't found a source for any of the others you mentioned. I
    >live in a remote part of India and my choices are limited to
    >what's available online, and _that_ range is very limited because
    >online shopping still has a long way to go here.



    In that case, the Hoya would probably be the best choice.

    The Kenko would also be worth considering but only if it is the
    top-of-the-range Pro1D version. The Kenko Pro1D did well in the
    Lenstip tests that someone else linked to. However, the cheaper Kenko
    filters don't have such a good reputation.
     
    Bruce, Mar 14, 2012
    #11
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