Which routing protocol to use?

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by smokejo@googlemail.com, Nov 21, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi

    We currently have about 12 branch offices around the city and one
    central HQ. At the moment, each office is connected to the internet via
    an ADSL connect and connected to HQ via a VPN, but we're going to be
    implementing leased lines and create an actual WAN.

    The routers we'll be using are Cisco, probably 2811's. Firewalls are
    Cisco PIX. Each site has about 30 users, their own /24 subnet and their
    own DC and File/Print server. Exchange boxes are located at HQ only.WAN
    links would be /30.

    What routing protocol is recommended? Since we are using Cisco only,
    EIGRP seemed to be the option to take, but are there any
    advantages/disadvantages of using OSPF?

    Thanks!
    SJ
    , Nov 21, 2006
    #1
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  2. Merv Guest

    OSPF supports a concept known as areas that allow a network to scale
    quite well. EIGRP does not supports areas

    For your size of network EIGRP will be fine and is very easily to
    configure and troubleshoot.

    Since your network will be hub and spoke, I would suggest you make use
    of the EIGRP stub feature - see

    http://www.ciscotaccc.com/kaidara-advisor/iprout/showcase?case=K17020846
    Merv, Nov 21, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Merv wrote:

    > OSPF supports a concept known as areas that allow a network to scale
    > quite well. EIGRP does not supports areas
    >
    > For your size of network EIGRP will be fine and is very easily to
    > configure and troubleshoot.
    >
    > Since your network will be hub and spoke, I would suggest you make use
    > of the EIGRP stub feature - see
    >
    > http://www.ciscotaccc.com/kaidara-advisor/iprout/showcase?case=K17020846


    Thanks...we are going for a hub and spoke system because leased lines
    between all sites would be too expensive, and there is also no direct
    need for a site to have a direct connection with another site, although
    this also means that if their leased line goes down, they are
    communicationless.

    Are there ways around this?
    , Nov 21, 2006
    #3
  4. writes:
    >We currently have about 12 branch offices around the city and one
    >central HQ. At the moment, each office is connected to the internet via
    >an ADSL connect and connected to HQ via a VPN, but we're going to be
    >implementing leased lines and create an actual WAN.


    >The routers we'll be using are Cisco, probably 2811's. Firewalls are
    >Cisco PIX. Each site has about 30 users, their own /24 subnet and their
    >own DC and File/Print server. Exchange boxes are located at HQ only.WAN
    >links would be /30.


    >What routing protocol is recommended? Since we are using Cisco only,
    >EIGRP seemed to be the option to take, but are there any
    >advantages/disadvantages of using OSPF?



    For 12 sites doing hub-and-spoke, I'd still be doing static routing.
    I don't see much need for a dynamic routing protocol in this network
    configuration unless you feel like learning one.
    Doug McIntyre, Nov 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Brian V Guest

    "Doug McIntyre" <> wrote in message
    news:4563182a$0$41764$...
    > writes:
    >>We currently have about 12 branch offices around the city and one
    >>central HQ. At the moment, each office is connected to the internet via
    >>an ADSL connect and connected to HQ via a VPN, but we're going to be
    >>implementing leased lines and create an actual WAN.

    >
    >>The routers we'll be using are Cisco, probably 2811's. Firewalls are
    >>Cisco PIX. Each site has about 30 users, their own /24 subnet and their
    >>own DC and File/Print server. Exchange boxes are located at HQ only.WAN
    >>links would be /30.

    >
    >>What routing protocol is recommended? Since we are using Cisco only,
    >>EIGRP seemed to be the option to take, but are there any
    >>advantages/disadvantages of using OSPF?

    >
    >
    > For 12 sites doing hub-and-spoke, I'd still be doing static routing.
    > I don't see much need for a dynamic routing protocol in this network
    > configuration unless you feel like learning one.


    I'd keep the VPN's up as backup and use statics/costed statics as Doug
    recomended. No need for a protocol, simple enough network.
    Brian V, Nov 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Guest

    Thanks for the replies...we did consider static routing, but the
    company (and therefore network) is expected to grow rapidly in the
    future, so we wanted whatever solution we implemented to be scaleable.
    What we do know is that the routers we use will always be Cisco,
    therefore it was a toss up between EIGRP and OSPF.

    I think we'll go for EIGRP...thanks again.

    SJ
    , Nov 21, 2006
    #6
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