which out of these two cables/ports is best for my miniDV camcorder?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by vj, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. vj

    vj Guest

    Hi all,

    I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.
    Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop. My
    Handycam has an output marked 'DV out' and with a symbol 'i' near it
    (second output from left out of four outputs present) that I
    understand is the output where firewire cable is to be connected
    (there is another output near it (first from left) with a USB sign on
    it). Now, my problem is like this:

    I have two cables, which both fit in the 'DV out' port of the
    handycam. Out of these two, one cable is having identical connector at
    the other end, and my laptop and my Desktop both have a port which
    matches this. The second cable is having a slightly bigger connector
    at the other end (of the size of a USB connector but thinned out
    slightly from one side, sorry I don't know what it is called). My
    Desktop has a receptacle for this as well, whereas my Laptop doesn't.

    I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    video. Please suggest.
    Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    provided on the handycam)?

    Thankyou
     
    vj, Jan 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. vj

    dj_nme Guest

    vj wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    > Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    > burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.
    > Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop. My
    > Handycam has an output marked 'DV out' and with a symbol 'i' near it
    > (second output from left out of four outputs present) that I
    > understand is the output where firewire cable is to be connected
    > (there is another output near it (first from left) with a USB sign on
    > it). Now, my problem is like this:
    >
    > I have two cables, which both fit in the 'DV out' port of the
    > handycam. Out of these two, one cable is having identical connector at
    > the other end, and my laptop and my Desktop both have a port which
    > matches this. The second cable is having a slightly bigger connector
    > at the other end (of the size of a USB connector but thinned out
    > slightly from one side, sorry I don't know what it is called). My
    > Desktop has a receptacle for this as well, whereas my Laptop doesn't.


    These cables should both be firewire cables, one with a compact plug on
    both ends and one with a compact plug on one end and full-sized plug on
    the other.
    This is a picture of a full-sized firewire plug:
    <http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/360773/2/istockphoto_360773_firewire_plug.jpg>
    and this is a compact firewire plug:
    <http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/360795/2/istockphoto_360795_firewire_plug_small.jpg>

    > I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    > video. Please suggest.


    Which-ever cable can plug into both your camcorder and laptop at the
    same time should be the correct one.
    If you have your capture/editing software running and then plug in your
    camcorder, it should be recognised and then be controllable via the
    transport controls (play, stop, fastforward and rewind) inside the
    program to cue up the video you wish to capture to your computer.

    > Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    > provided on the handycam)?


    From my own research into this, it appears that the LANC port is for
    some sort of data/control signal.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LANC seems to bear this out, but I've never
    used any LANC accessories and so can't really say one way or the other.
     
    dj_nme, Jan 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. vj

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (vj) wrote in
    news::

    > I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that
    > using Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently
    > for burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to
    > USB.


    Firewire might be faster than USB, but why would it provide better
    quality video?

    Bits is bits, after all.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Jan 17, 2008
    #3
  4. vj

    tony cooper Guest

    On Thu, 17 Jan 2008 07:00:20 -0800 (PST), vj <>
    wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    >I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    >Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    >burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.
    >Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop.


    You can't make a mistake. The Firewire cable has different plug
    shapes than the USB cable. At both ends. Check
    http://fwdepot.com/thestore/images/xl_db-35u2fw.jpg where the Firewire
    port is at the left, and USB ports are on the right. You may have to
    add a IEEE card to your laptop.


    >I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    >video.


    I'm trying to remember the circumstances, but my Sony HC-21 would
    upload on USB doing something, but I had to add a IEEE card and
    Firewire to effectively upload. Firewire is better, but Firewire
    might also be required.


    Please suggest.
    >Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    >provided on the handycam)?
    >

    A jack to accommodate a wired remote for control of the camera's
    functions. Here's what would plug into it:
    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1009&page=1&message=1711078
    A gadget most of us would never need.





    --

    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jan 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Re: which out of these two cables/ports is best for my miniDVcamcorder?

    On Jan 17, 9:00 am, vj <> wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    > Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    > burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.
    > Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop. My
    > Handycam has an output marked 'DV out' and with a symbol 'i' near it
    > (second output from left out of four outputs present) that I
    > understand is the output where firewire cable is to be connected
    > (there is another output near it (first from left) with a USB sign on
    > it). Now, my problem is like this:
    >
    > I have two cables, which both fit in the 'DV out' port of the
    > handycam. Out of these two, one cable is having identical connector at
    > the other end, and my laptop and my Desktop both have a port which
    > matches this. The second cable is having a slightly bigger connector
    > at the other end (of the size of a USB connector but thinned out
    > slightly from one side, sorry I don't know what it is called). My
    > Desktop has a receptacle for this as well, whereas my Laptop doesn't.
    >
    > I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    > video. Please suggest.
    > Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    > provided on the handycam)?
    >
    > Thankyou



    while some cameras DO have a USB output, your editing software may not
    accept it. Almost all editing software can make use of Firewire
    inputs.

    The LANC connector is a two-way link that provides control. You can
    start, stop, maybe even zoom lens, and read the time/footage value if
    you want to control camera with a computer.
     
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Jan 17, 2008
    #5
  6. vj

    tony cooper Guest

    On 17 Jan 2008 15:29:54 GMT, Bert Hyman <> wrote:

    > (vj) wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that
    >> using Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently
    >> for burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to
    >> USB.

    >
    >Firewire might be faster than USB, but why would it provide better
    >quality video?
    >
    >Bits is bits, after all.


    Transfers with USB from a Sony will sometimes be jerky and unstable.
    Why, I don't know, but I've seen it.

    Some editing programs require Firewire tranfer for Capture. I haven't
    used it for awhile, but I believe Pinnacle Studio requires Firewire.
    One of the programs I tried did.





    --

    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Jan 17, 2008
    #6
  7. vj

    redflag Guest

    Firewire. Hands down. It's the small vertical rectangle with
    the small indentation in the middle. It should be labeled
    "DV/IEEE 1394".

    I think that whoever designed that plug made an engineering
    error or, at best, an engineering "oversight" which means,in
    the pig's English, they fucked up.


    vj wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    > Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    > burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.
    > Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop. My
    > Handycam has an output marked 'DV out' and with a symbol 'i' near it
    > (second output from left out of four outputs present) that I
    > understand is the output where firewire cable is to be connected
    > (there is another output near it (first from left) with a USB sign on
    > it). Now, my problem is like this:
    >
    > I have two cables, which both fit in the 'DV out' port of the
    > handycam. Out of these two, one cable is having identical connector at
    > the other end, and my laptop and my Desktop both have a port which
    > matches this. The second cable is having a slightly bigger connector
    > at the other end (of the size of a USB connector but thinned out
    > slightly from one side, sorry I don't know what it is called). My
    > Desktop has a receptacle for this as well, whereas my Laptop doesn't.
    >
    > I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    > video. Please suggest.
    > Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    > provided on the handycam)?
    >
    > Thankyou
    >
     
    redflag, Jan 17, 2008
    #7
  8. vj

    redflag Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > (vj) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    >> I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that
    >> using Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently
    >> for burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to
    >> USB.

    >
    > Firewire might be faster than USB, but why would it provide better
    > quality video?
    >
    > Bits is bits, after all.
    >


    But stationary bits are not the same as bits in motion.

    Bits transferred in large quantities [packets, I believe
    is the term] keep their "original" shape better the faster
    they are moved en bloc.

    Digital images captured in color pose the greatest
    technological challenge to program and hardware
    designers.
     
    redflag, Jan 17, 2008
    #8
  9. vj

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (redflag) wrote in
    news:elPjj.55336$:

    > Bits transferred in large quantities [packets, I believe
    > is the term] keep their "original" shape better the faster
    > they are moved en bloc.


    That's pretty silly. A packet full of bits is nothing but a bunch of
    individual bits, sent one after another.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Jan 17, 2008
    #9
  10. vj

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (redflag) wrote in
    news:elPjj.55336$:

    > Bert Hyman wrote:
    >> (vj) wrote in
    >> news:
    >> m:
    >>
    >>> I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that
    >>> using Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and
    >>> subsequently for burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality
    >>> as compared to USB.

    >>
    >> Firewire might be faster than USB, but why would it provide better
    >> quality video?
    >>
    >> Bits is bits, after all.
    >>

    >
    > But stationary bits are not the same as bits in motion.
    >


    Do bits move better across a Firewire interface than a USB interface?

    Perhaps Firewire cables are internally lubricated.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Jan 17, 2008
    #10
  11. vj

    redflag Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > (redflag) wrote in
    > news:elPjj.55336$:
    >
    >> Bits transferred in large quantities [packets, I believe
    >> is the term] keep their "original" shape better the faster
    >> they are moved en bloc.

    >
    > That's pretty silly. A packet full of bits is nothing but a bunch of
    > individual bits, sent one after another.


    Hey, don't complain, I feel the same way as you.

    But please keep in mind that I made the distinction
    between bits that were standing still and bits that
    were in motion.

    I'm sure I don't need to remind you that when bits of
    data are transferred from one device to another they
    are almost instantly set into motion.

    The speed of that "motion" of bits taking place
    has an effect of their ultimate quality in the
    host device.

    Otherwise what you say is absolutely true: Bits is bits.
     
    redflag, Jan 17, 2008
    #11
  12. vj

    redflag Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:

    >>>

    >> But stationary bits are not the same as bits in motion.
    >>

    >
    > Do bits move better across a Firewire interface than a USB interface?
    >
    > Perhaps Firewire cables are internally lubricated.
    >


    Yeah, they're lubricated, so to speak, by more conductive
    material.

    And then there's the fusion of space-age alloys and
    fiber optics...
     
    redflag, Jan 17, 2008
    #12
  13. vj

    Bert Hyman Guest

    In news:bOQjj.55377$ redflag
    <> wrote:

    > The speed of that "motion" of bits taking place
    > has an effect of their ultimate quality in the
    > host device.
    >


    Since the bits in a Firewire interface "move" at the same or faster rate
    as in a USB interface, by your standard, a USB connection should be the
    same or even slightly better than Firewire.

    --
    Bert Hyman St. Paul, MN
     
    Bert Hyman, Jan 17, 2008
    #13
  14. vj

    redflag Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > In news:bOQjj.55377$ redflag
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> The speed of that "motion" of bits taking place
    >> has an effect of their ultimate quality in the
    >> host device.
    >>

    >
    > Since the bits in a Firewire interface "move" at the same or faster rate
    > as in a USB interface, by your standard, a USB connection should be the
    > same or even slightly better than Firewire.
    >


    Quite the opposite. For technical reasons I barely
    understand (I presume the conductive material in Firewire
    is made of better stuff), firewire is faster
    than USB.
     
    redflag, Jan 18, 2008
    #14
  15. vj

    dj_nme Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > In news:bOQjj.55377$ redflag
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The speed of that "motion" of bits taking place
    >>has an effect of their ultimate quality in the
    >>host device.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Since the bits in a Firewire interface "move" at the same or faster rate
    > as in a USB interface, by your standard, a USB connection should be the
    > same or even slightly better than Firewire.


    That would be USB 2, which is marginally faster than FireWire.

    On a video camera, the USB port is usually used primarily for
    downloading still images (usually stored on an SD card) just like an
    ordinary stills camera, this doesn't have to worry about the portion of
    tape with the data passing by the read heads (be it magnetic for DV cams
    or optical for DVD cams) before transport protocol has had time to
    tranfer it to the camera.
    The problem is that most camcorders will only have a USB 1.1 (or USB 1,
    which is even slower) port, which is considerably slower than FireWire.
     
    dj_nme, Jan 18, 2008
    #15
  16. vj

    John Navas Guest

    On Fri, 18 Jan 2008 11:12:17 +1100, dj_nme <> wrote
    in <478feeeb$0$30853$>:

    >Bert Hyman wrote:
    >> In news:bOQjj.55377$ redflag
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>The speed of that "motion" of bits taking place
    >>>has an effect of their ultimate quality in the
    >>>host device.

    >>
    >> Since the bits in a Firewire interface "move" at the same or faster rate
    >> as in a USB interface, by your standard, a USB connection should be the
    >> same or even slightly better than Firewire.

    >
    >That would be USB 2, which is marginally faster than FireWire.
    >
    >On a video camera, the USB port is usually used primarily for
    >downloading still images (usually stored on an SD card) just like an
    >ordinary stills camera, this doesn't have to worry about the portion of
    >tape with the data passing by the read heads (be it magnetic for DV cams
    >or optical for DVD cams) before transport protocol has had time to
    >tranfer it to the camera.
    >The problem is that most camcorders will only have a USB 1.1 (or USB 1,
    >which is even slower) port, which is considerably slower than FireWire.



    For Firewire versus USB Hi-Speed, see
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus#USB_compared_with_FireWire>

    These and other differences reflect the differing design goals of the
    two buses: USB was designed for simplicity and low cost, while
    FireWire was designed for high performance, particularly in
    time-sensitive applications such as audio and video. Although similar
    in theoretical maximum transfer rate, in real-world use, especially
    for high-bandwidth use such as external hard-drives, FireWire 400
    generally has a significantly higher throughput than USB 2.0
    Hi-Speed.

    --
    Best regards,
    John Navas
    Panasonic DMC-FZ8 (and several others)
     
    John Navas, Jan 18, 2008
    #16
  17. vj

    Bert Hyman Guest

    (redflag) wrote in news:mRQjj.55380$_m.15135
    @bignews4.bellsouth.net:

    > And then there's the fusion of space-age alloys and
    > fiber optics...


    Don't quit your day job.

    --
    Bert Hyman | St. Paul, MN |
     
    Bert Hyman, Jan 18, 2008
    #17
  18. vj

    redflag Guest

    Bert Hyman wrote:
    > (redflag) wrote in news:mRQjj.55380$_m.15135
    > @bignews4.bellsouth.net:
    >
    >> And then there's the fusion of space-age alloys and
    >> fiber optics...

    >
    > Don't quit your day job.
    >


    LOL! Good advise!
     
    redflag, Jan 18, 2008
    #18
  19. ? "vj" <> ?????? ??? ??????
    news:...
    > Hi all,
    >
    > I have a Sony MiniDV handycam model DCR HC 18. I understand that using
    > Firewire connection to transfer video to PC (and subsequently for
    > burning DVD out of it) provides a better quality as compared to USB.

    Not just that, but firewire is a standard in transferring digital video in
    real time, from a camcorder to a computer.
    > Now I am not sure which is the firewire port in my PC/Laptop. My
    > Handycam has an output marked 'DV out' and with a symbol 'i' near it
    > (second output from left out of four outputs present) that I
    > understand is the output where firewire cable is to be connected
    > (there is another output near it (first from left) with a USB sign on
    > it).

    This is the 4 in 1 firewire receptacle
    ..> Now, my problem is like this:
    >
    > I have two cables, which both fit in the 'DV out' port of the
    > handycam. Out of these two, one cable is having identical connector at
    > the other end, and my laptop and my Desktop both have a port which
    > matches this. The second cable is having a slightly bigger connector
    > at the other end (of the size of a USB connector but thinned out
    > slightly from one side, sorry I don't know what it is called).

    It's a 6 in 1 firewire receptacle.
    >My
    > Desktop has a receptacle for this as well, >whereas my Laptop doesn't.

    Since you have both a desktop and a laptop, I strongly recommend you use the
    former one, since it has more processing power, a faster spinning hard
    drive, more powerful processor etc.and so will yield better results.
    > I am not sure which cable out of these two gives a better quality
    > video. Please suggest.
    > Also, what is the 'LANC' output (fourth from left and last output
    > provided on the handycam)?
    >

    It's sony's proprietary system, for connecting your camcorder to a remote
    release or whatever.
    > Thankyou
    >

    HTH,


    --
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios
    major in electrical engineering
    mechanized infantry reservist
    hordad AT otenet DOT gr
     
    Tzortzakakis Dimitrios, Jan 18, 2008
    #19
  20. dj_nme <> writes:

    >On a video camera, the USB port is usually used primarily for
    >downloading still images (usually stored on an SD card) just like an
    >ordinary stills camera, this doesn't have to worry about the portion of
    >tape with the data passing by the read heads (be it magnetic for DV cams
    >or optical for DVD cams) before transport protocol has had time to
    >tranfer it to the camera.
    >The problem is that most camcorders will only have a USB 1.1 (or USB 1,
    >which is even slower) port, which is considerably slower than FireWire.


    Even when DV cameras *do* have a USB2 port which they use to transfer
    still images at high speed to a computer, they generally just do not
    have firmware support for transferring the DV video data over USB2 -
    even though USB2 is plenty fast enough for the 25 Mbit/s DV data rate.

    I happen to own a Canon Optura 60, which is one of the few DV cameras
    that can transfer full video data over USB2. But it requires special
    software on the computer end, and the software only works under some
    versions of Windows, and it's not clear whether you can use the editing
    program of your choice to capture the data even then. In comparision,
    every DV camera provides a Firewire port that will do data transfer as
    well as providing some amount of remote device control, and essentially
    every editing program supports capture via Firewire. So that's the way
    to go, even with a camera that theoretically supports USB2 as well.

    My former computer was old enough that I had to buy a Firewire interface
    card for it. But anything you buy today will probably have a Firewire
    port or two on the motherboard.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Jan 18, 2008
    #20
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