Which one is Easier

Discussion in 'MCSD' started by Aloha Chief, Sep 17, 2003.

  1. Aloha Chief

    Aloha Chief Guest

    Aloha,

    I've taken 70-305,70-306,70-229 so far.

    I've tried 70-310 twice. I am using Sybex and
    Transcender... I'm thinking of taking 70-300 then re-take
    70-310 after. Is 70-300 easier then 70-310 ? PLease
    share...

    Aloha Chief
     
    Aloha Chief, Sep 17, 2003
    #1
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  2. Aloha Chief

    Somchai U. Guest

    I think 70-300 is quite different. It is more ambiguous to answer than all
    exams you have passed. Because I take the exams when Microsoft disclose the
    score, I cannot compare which is easier. I suggest you pass 70-310 before
    70-300. You need overall concepts for 70-300.

    Somchai

    "Aloha Chief" <> wrote in message
    news:06b901c37cb6$60a209b0$...
    > Aloha,
    >
    > I've taken 70-305,70-306,70-229 so far.
    >
    > I've tried 70-310 twice. I am using Sybex and
    > Transcender... I'm thinking of taking 70-300 then re-take
    > 70-310 after. Is 70-300 easier then 70-310 ? PLease
    > share...
    >
    > Aloha Chief
     
    Somchai U., Sep 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    I couldn't agree more.

    >-----Original Message-----
    >I think 70-300 is quite different. It is more ambiguous

    to answer than all
    >exams you have passed. Because I take the exams when

    Microsoft disclose the
    >score, I cannot compare which is easier. I suggest you

    pass 70-310 before
    >70-300. You need overall concepts for 70-300.
    >
    >Somchai
    >
    >"Aloha Chief" <> wrote in message
    >news:06b901c37cb6$60a209b0$...
    >> Aloha,
    >>
    >> I've taken 70-305,70-306,70-229 so far.
    >>
    >> I've tried 70-310 twice. I am using Sybex and
    >> Transcender... I'm thinking of taking 70-300 then re-

    take
    >> 70-310 after. Is 70-300 easier then 70-310 ? PLease
    >> share...
    >>
    >> Aloha Chief

    >
    >
    >.
    >
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #3
  4. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    Troll.
    On Wed, 17 Sep 2003 10:09:24 -0700, "Kline Sphere" <> wrote:

    >I couldn't agree more.
    >
    >>-----Original Message-----
    >>I think 70-300 is quite different. It is more ambiguous

    >to answer than all
    >>exams you have passed. Because I take the exams when

    >Microsoft disclose the
    >>score, I cannot compare which is easier. I suggest you

    >pass 70-310 before
    >>70-300. You need overall concepts for 70-300.
    >>
    >>Somchai
    >>
    >>"Aloha Chief" <> wrote in message
    >>news:06b901c37cb6$60a209b0$...
    >>> Aloha,
    >>>
    >>> I've taken 70-305,70-306,70-229 so far.
    >>>
    >>> I've tried 70-310 twice. I am using Sybex and
    >>> Transcender... I'm thinking of taking 70-300 then re-

    >take
    >>> 70-310 after. Is 70-300 easier then 70-310 ? PLease
    >>> share...
    >>>
    >>> Aloha Chief

    >>
    >>
    >>.
    >>
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Aloha Chief

    Sarang Guest

    Hi,

    The 310 is infact tougher that 70-300 as per my
    experience. I found 70-300 abosulutely stupid. I mean any
    tom-dick and harry can pass this exam. The quality of
    exam 70-100 for the earlier track was much better. I
    suggest you still attempt 310 before 70-300. Leave the
    simpler part for the last. go through the offical
    curriculam and MSDN references thoroughly for 10 days. I
    am sure you will get thru in 310.

    Beleive me 70300 is a piece of cake.

    Cheers and Best of Luck
     
    Sarang, Sep 17, 2003
    #5
  6. It's not been a piece of cake based on the number of posts of people who've
    failed it...

    It's straight forward if you've been doing analysis for sometime, but some
    folks aren't that talented at "listening", or in the case of the exam,
    reading.

    I agree 100%;, the 70-100 was harder. Although, the 70-100 had a lot of
    database questions, that to me, seemed out of place on the exam. 70-300
    seemed more accurate in measuring the skills of someone who is doing
    analysis.

    Just my $.02...

    --
    Leigh Kendall, MCSD, MCDBA

    "Sarang" <> wrote in message
    news:021001c37d47$c0a1b900$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > The 310 is infact tougher that 70-300 as per my
    > experience. I found 70-300 abosulutely stupid. I mean any
    > tom-dick and harry can pass this exam. The quality of
    > exam 70-100 for the earlier track was much better. I
    > suggest you still attempt 310 before 70-300. Leave the
    > simpler part for the last. go through the offical
    > curriculam and MSDN references thoroughly for 10 days. I
    > am sure you will get thru in 310.
    >
    > Beleive me 70300 is a piece of cake.
    >
    > Cheers and Best of Luck
     
    Leigh Kendall, Sep 17, 2003
    #6
  7. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >It's straight forward if you've been doing analysis for sometime, but some
    >folks aren't that talented at "listening", or in the case of the exam,
    >reading.


    In that case they have no business taking the exam.

    The biggest problems with software development occur early on in the
    development process, often by people who don't know how to 'listen',
    or rather, understand the business problem at hand. These problems are
    amplified as the development process continues, until someone is brave
    enough to stay 'what the hell are we doing?', and the project gets
    canned.
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #7
  8. Understanding the problem is half the battle. The other half is completing
    the design that satisfies the problem before you cut the code.


    "Kline Sphere" <T> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >It's straight forward if you've been doing analysis for sometime, but

    some
    > >folks aren't that talented at "listening", or in the case of the exam,
    > >reading.

    >
    > In that case they have no business taking the exam.
    >
    > The biggest problems with software development occur early on in the
    > development process, often by people who don't know how to 'listen',
    > or rather, understand the business problem at hand. These problems are
    > amplified as the development process continues, until someone is brave
    > enough to stay 'what the hell are we doing?', and the project gets
    > canned.
     
    Davin Mickelson, Sep 17, 2003
    #8
  9. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >Understanding the problem is half the battle.

    More than 1/2 the battle.

    If you don't understand the problem, no matter what design is chosen,
    the result will be a failure. The question that needs to be
    continually asked during the development process is 'Are we building
    the right system?' and not just 'Are we building the system right?'
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #9
  10. I'm impressed. That one knocked me out of my chair. Thanks for the point.
    You should write about this stuff.


    "Kline Sphere" <T> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >Understanding the problem is half the battle.

    >
    > More than 1/2 the battle.
    >
    > If you don't understand the problem, no matter what design is chosen,
    > the result will be a failure. The question that needs to be
    > continually asked during the development process is 'Are we building
    > the right system?' and not just 'Are we building the system right?'
     
    Davin Mickelson, Sep 17, 2003
    #10
  11. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >I'm impressed. That one knocked me out of my chair. Thanks for the point.
    >You should write about this stuff.


    Roger Pressman already has!!
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #11
  12. Where? Which book?
    He has roughly seven books on Amazon.

    "Kline Sphere" <T> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >I'm impressed. That one knocked me out of my chair. Thanks for the point.
    > >You should write about this stuff.

    >
    > Roger Pressman already has!!
     
    Davin Mickelson, Sep 17, 2003
    #12
  13. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >Where? Which book?
    >He has roughly seven books on Amazon.


    Software Engineering: A practitioner's approach - 5th Ed

    ISBN - 0077096770 or 0072496681 (more recent update)

    Considered by many to be the Software Engineering Bible, used a lot in
    Universities and Colleges throughout the world.
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 17, 2003
    #13
  14. Aloha Chief

    Deacon Guest

    70-300 is the absolute measurement of what an MCSD should be (in my
    opinion). It's a developer's test. Not a coder's. There's a place for
    both developers and coders but our entire industry is being
    disassembled by the belief that EVERYONE is a developer (analyst).

    Does it surprise you that so many projects are canned when not one
    person on the team has any idea of the overall solution? It's like
    "let's through 10 programmers at it and see what happens…" I've been
    an Analyst/Developer for 13 years and 70-300 was the easiest test I've
    taken. Another coder that works with me (he's been in the business for
    2 years) said it was the hardest. I think that says it all…

    Deacon
    MCAD.Net, MCSD.Net


    Kline Sphere <?> wrote in message news:<>...
    > >Where? Which book?
    > >He has roughly seven books on Amazon.

    >
    > Software Engineering: A practitioner's approach - 5th Ed
    >
    > ISBN - 0077096770 or 0072496681 (more recent update)
    >
    > Considered by many to be the Software Engineering Bible, used a lot in
    > Universities and Colleges throughout the world.
     
    Deacon, Sep 18, 2003
    #14
  15. Aloha Chief

    Jim Parker Guest

    In my experience the problem usually starts not with the software architect
    and developers understanding the problem and defining a solution.
    It usually starts earlier than that, with the business problem definition
    itself, which is usually delivered to the architect without a lot of
    forethought.

    I don't know how many times I have been delivered a business problem
    definition, come up with a plan, got approval on that plan, started the
    software team on the solution, gave demos during the process, put up with
    changes in the business problem definition in the middle of the development
    process, then at time of delivery it is suddenly realized that the (greatly
    modified) business problem is not correct. You have critical changes to
    make throughout the development process even though you worked on and
    attempted delivery of what was requested, and are usually not given an
    extension on the deadline.

    It seems that the business analyst is almost never held accountable for
    these problems; it is the software development team that is seen as
    squandering time on wasted efforts and not delivering what was needed to
    solve the problem.

    My 2 cents worth.
    JD.


    "Davin Mickelson" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Understanding the problem is half the battle. The other half is completing
    > the design that satisfies the problem before you cut the code.
    >
    >
    > "Kline Sphere" <T> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > >It's straight forward if you've been doing analysis for sometime, but

    > some
    > > >folks aren't that talented at "listening", or in the case of the exam,
    > > >reading.

    > >
    > > In that case they have no business taking the exam.
    > >
    > > The biggest problems with software development occur early on in the
    > > development process, often by people who don't know how to 'listen',
    > > or rather, understand the business problem at hand. These problems are
    > > amplified as the development process continues, until someone is brave
    > > enough to stay 'what the hell are we doing?', and the project gets
    > > canned.

    >
    >
     
    Jim Parker, Sep 18, 2003
    #15
  16. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >70-300 is the absolute measurement of what an MCSD should be (in my
    >opinion).


    Agree with what you are saying, although not with the snip above -
    nothing in the real world is that easy.
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 18, 2003
    #16
  17. Aloha Chief

    Kline Sphere Guest

    More or less what I have already said.

    The problems you mention are down to a poor process model which
    incorporates a lack of quality. Often analysis models are never even
    produced, and when they are, they are never reviewed for correctness
    and completeness. Any manager that has any understanding about quality
    assurance will recognize and understand the amplification of costs and
    time for errors which are not uncovered during requirements analysis
    and are allowed to manifest themselves into design, implementation,
    system testing or even to delivery of the system. In other words
    complete and utter short sightedness with a view to saving a dollar or
    two in the short term, which in the longer term, ends up costing much,
    much more.

    On Thu, 18 Sep 2003 08:02:24 -0600, "Jim Parker"
    <> wrote:

    >In my experience the problem usually starts not with the software architect
    >and developers understanding the problem and defining a solution.
    >It usually starts earlier than that, with the business problem definition
    >itself, which is usually delivered to the architect without a lot of
    >forethought.
    >
    >I don't know how many times I have been delivered a business problem
    >definition, come up with a plan, got approval on that plan, started the
    >software team on the solution, gave demos during the process, put up with
    >changes in the business problem definition in the middle of the development
    >process, then at time of delivery it is suddenly realized that the (greatly
    >modified) business problem is not correct. You have critical changes to
    >make throughout the development process even though you worked on and
    >attempted delivery of what was requested, and are usually not given an
    >extension on the deadline.
    >
    >It seems that the business analyst is almost never held accountable for
    >these problems; it is the software development team that is seen as
    >squandering time on wasted efforts and not delivering what was needed to
    >solve the problem.
    >
    >My 2 cents worth.
    >JD.
    >
    >
    >"Davin Mickelson" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Understanding the problem is half the battle. The other half is completing
    >> the design that satisfies the problem before you cut the code.
    >>
    >>
    >> "Kline Sphere" <T> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > >It's straight forward if you've been doing analysis for sometime, but

    >> some
    >> > >folks aren't that talented at "listening", or in the case of the exam,
    >> > >reading.
    >> >
    >> > In that case they have no business taking the exam.
    >> >
    >> > The biggest problems with software development occur early on in the
    >> > development process, often by people who don't know how to 'listen',
    >> > or rather, understand the business problem at hand. These problems are
    >> > amplified as the development process continues, until someone is brave
    >> > enough to stay 'what the hell are we doing?', and the project gets
    >> > canned.

    >>
    >>

    >
     
    Kline Sphere, Sep 18, 2003
    #17
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