Which filter to purchase with the Canon Digital Rebel Kit?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bill Jones, Nov 23, 2003.

  1. Bill Jones

    Bill Jones Guest

    I have heard that using certain filters with the 18-55mm lense that
    comes with the Rebel Kit could be problematic because the front of the
    lense turns when focusing. Also Polarizing filters require increasing
    the f-stop to compensate for their factor. Can someone suggest a good
    all around protective filter to use with this lense, ie. UV, Skylight...
    And are filters needed in the same way as they are with film based
    cameras.

    Thanks in Advance,

    Bill
     
    Bill Jones, Nov 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Bill Jones

    DHB Guest

    Bill,
    search deeper in this news group & your likely to find heated
    debates between those that feel that anything placed in front of a lens will
    only increase the chances of unwanted reflections, distortion & offer little
    or no protection, they recommend a rigid lens hood & occasional gentle
    cleaning of the front lens element when needed.

    The 2nd group generally contends that cleaning the front lens element
    too much can wear away it's anti-reflective coating & thus cause unwanted
    reflections. They generally feel that it's a lot cheaper to replace a
    filter than have the front lens element replaced if something were to impact
    it. Also some people feel a degree of safety with a filter & that too has
    value even if the filter rarely saves a lens from damage.

    The truth is that both groups are basically correct on these points &
    some others that I have not mentioned. Obviously this becomes more of a
    personal choice based mostly on ones comfort level & the type of photography
    "you" expect to be doing with your camera & lens combination.

    My advice would be to balance the pros & cons of both & then decide what
    "YOU" fell is best for "YOUR" situation & comfort zone.

    What I did & recommend for consideration:

    <1> Purchased & installed HOYA HMC UV(0) filters for all 3 of my Digital
    Rebel / 300D lenses. These are multi-coated UV filters so that should
    greatly reduce the chances of any additional reflections.

    <2> When I save enough to purchase a Canon 28-135mm IS lens, I will also
    buy a HOYA HMC UV(0) filter & a rigid lens hood for it. Best of both
    schools of thought?

    <3> Take good care of your lenses & try your best not to place yourself
    or them in harms way just to get a better shot. However unexpected things
    do happen so this is why "YOU" must decide for yourself after hearing both
    sides of the issue.

    <4> Don't get a "Skylight" or any similar filter that will interfere
    with the AWB of the camera. The Digital Rebel / 300D already does poorly at
    setting the white balance indoors (almost always comes out way too warm
    "yellowish") & the manual WB presets don't help much but thankfully the
    "custom white balance does". But rather than have to keep reprogramming it
    for changing light temperatures, I now shoot in RAW mode for most everything
    but midday outdoor shoots & indoor external flash shots.

    Hope this information is helpful to you & others.

    As for some of the others out there, I am putting on my flame retardant
    clothing just in case I get flamed from 1 camp or the other or even for
    taking the middle ground! <G>

    Respectfully, DHB


    "Bill Jones" <> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1a2a8e293113a7f0989694@news...
    > I have heard that using certain filters with the 18-55mm lense that
    > comes with the Rebel Kit could be problematic because the front of the
    > lense turns when focusing. Also Polarizing filters require increasing
    > the f-stop to compensate for their factor. Can someone suggest a good
    > all around protective filter to use with this lense, ie. UV, Skylight...
    > And are filters needed in the same way as they are with film based
    > cameras.
    >
    > Thanks in Advance,
    >
    > Bill
     
    DHB, Nov 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. Bill Jones

    Bill Jones Guest

    In article <C35wb.6209$7%>,
    says...
    > Bill,
    > search deeper in this news group & your likely to find heated
    > debates between those that feel that anything placed in front of a lens will
    > only increase the chances of unwanted reflections, distortion & offer little
    > or no protection, they recommend a rigid lens hood & occasional gentle
    > cleaning of the front lens element when needed.
    >
    > The 2nd group generally contends that cleaning the front lens element
    > too much can wear away it's anti-reflective coating & thus cause unwanted
    > reflections. They generally feel that it's a lot cheaper to replace a
    > filter than have the front lens element replaced if something were to impact
    > it. Also some people feel a degree of safety with a filter & that too has
    > value even if the filter rarely saves a lens from damage.
    >
    > The truth is that both groups are basically correct on these points &
    > some others that I have not mentioned. Obviously this becomes more of a
    > personal choice based mostly on ones comfort level & the type of photography
    > "you" expect to be doing with your camera & lens combination.
    >
    > My advice would be to balance the pros & cons of both & then decide what
    > "YOU" fell is best for "YOUR" situation & comfort zone.
    >
    > What I did & recommend for consideration:
    >
    > <1> Purchased & installed HOYA HMC UV(0) filters for all 3 of my Digital
    > Rebel / 300D lenses. These are multi-coated UV filters so that should
    > greatly reduce the chances of any additional reflections.
    >
    > <2> When I save enough to purchase a Canon 28-135mm IS lens, I will also
    > buy a HOYA HMC UV(0) filter & a rigid lens hood for it. Best of both
    > schools of thought?
    >
    > <3> Take good care of your lenses & try your best not to place yourself
    > or them in harms way just to get a better shot. However unexpected things
    > do happen so this is why "YOU" must decide for yourself after hearing both
    > sides of the issue.
    >
    > <4> Don't get a "Skylight" or any similar filter that will interfere
    > with the AWB of the camera. The Digital Rebel / 300D already does poorly at
    > setting the white balance indoors (almost always comes out way too warm
    > "yellowish") & the manual WB presets don't help much but thankfully the
    > "custom white balance does". But rather than have to keep reprogramming it
    > for changing light temperatures, I now shoot in RAW mode for most everything
    > but midday outdoor shoots & indoor external flash shots.
    >
    > Hope this information is helpful to you & others.
    >
    > As for some of the others out there, I am putting on my flame retardant
    > clothing just in case I get flamed from 1 camp or the other or even for
    > taking the middle ground! <G>

    Thanks for all your informative thoughts. What is the reasonning behind
    a rigid lense hood vs. the rubber collapsable one?
     
    Bill Jones, Nov 23, 2003
    #3
  4. Bill Jones

    DHB Guest

    Bill,
    to answer your question:

    What is the reasonning behind a rigid lense hood vs. the rubber
    collapsable one?

    Rigid lens hoods are usually made out of fairly thin anodized aluminum
    which may protect the front part of a lens from an impact including 1 with
    the ground if dropped while attempting to change the lens.

    A rubber lens hood would likely just collapse & offer little or no
    protection. The same is true of a large object hitting near the front of
    the lens such as a volleyball or softball (it can happen).

    Lastly rigid lens hoods that made by the same company that makes your
    lens are often specifically designed for that 1 lens & thus are just wide
    enough to keep unwanted light out while not blocking the lens. Conversely
    generic rubber lens hoods tend to be wider & shorter, thus are often less
    effective at shielding unwanted light.

    There are others on this newsgroup with far more knowledge than I who
    can probably explain things better than I can but hopefully this proves of
    some help in answering your question.

    Respectfully, DHB



    "Bill Jones" <> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1a2ab1c27c6b6ec7989695@news...
    > In article <C35wb.6209$7%>,
    > says...
    > > Bill,
    > > search deeper in this news group & your likely to find heated
    > > debates between those that feel that anything placed in front of a lens

    will
    > > only increase the chances of unwanted reflections, distortion & offer

    little
    > > or no protection, they recommend a rigid lens hood & occasional gentle
    > > cleaning of the front lens element when needed.
    > >
    > > The 2nd group generally contends that cleaning the front lens

    element
    > > too much can wear away it's anti-reflective coating & thus cause

    unwanted
    > > reflections. They generally feel that it's a lot cheaper to replace a
    > > filter than have the front lens element replaced if something were to

    impact
    > > it. Also some people feel a degree of safety with a filter & that too

    has
    > > value even if the filter rarely saves a lens from damage.
    > >
    > > The truth is that both groups are basically correct on these points

    &
    > > some others that I have not mentioned. Obviously this becomes more of a
    > > personal choice based mostly on ones comfort level & the type of

    photography
    > > "you" expect to be doing with your camera & lens combination.
    > >
    > > My advice would be to balance the pros & cons of both & then decide

    what
    > > "YOU" fell is best for "YOUR" situation & comfort zone.
    > >
    > > What I did & recommend for consideration:
    > >
    > > <1> Purchased & installed HOYA HMC UV(0) filters for all 3 of my

    Digital
    > > Rebel / 300D lenses. These are multi-coated UV filters so that should
    > > greatly reduce the chances of any additional reflections.
    > >
    > > <2> When I save enough to purchase a Canon 28-135mm IS lens, I will

    also
    > > buy a HOYA HMC UV(0) filter & a rigid lens hood for it. Best of both
    > > schools of thought?
    > >
    > > <3> Take good care of your lenses & try your best not to place

    yourself
    > > or them in harms way just to get a better shot. However unexpected

    things
    > > do happen so this is why "YOU" must decide for yourself after hearing

    both
    > > sides of the issue.
    > >
    > > <4> Don't get a "Skylight" or any similar filter that will interfere
    > > with the AWB of the camera. The Digital Rebel / 300D already does

    poorly at
    > > setting the white balance indoors (almost always comes out way too warm
    > > "yellowish") & the manual WB presets don't help much but thankfully the
    > > "custom white balance does". But rather than have to keep reprogramming

    it
    > > for changing light temperatures, I now shoot in RAW mode for most

    everything
    > > but midday outdoor shoots & indoor external flash shots.
    > >
    > > Hope this information is helpful to you & others.
    > >
    > > As for some of the others out there, I am putting on my flame

    retardant
    > > clothing just in case I get flamed from 1 camp or the other or even for
    > > taking the middle ground! <G>

    > Thanks for all your informative thoughts. What is the reasonning behind
    > a rigid lense hood vs. the rubber collapsable one?
     
    DHB, Nov 23, 2003
    #4
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