Which digital camera to choose? Need advices!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by bardamu, Aug 1, 2006.

  1. bardamu

    bardamu Guest

    Hello everybody,

    I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are getting
    closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it wrong.
    I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    one? Any other suggestion?
    I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.

    Thanks for any help

    Cheers
    Phil
     
    bardamu, Aug 1, 2006
    #1
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  2. bardamu

    AZ Nomad Guest

    On Tue, 1 Aug 2006 22:05:08 +0200, bardamu <> wrote:


    >Hello everybody,


    >I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are getting
    >closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    >cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    >narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it wrong.
    >I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    >For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    >or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    >one? Any other suggestion?
    >I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.


    You post is kind of like somebody going into a autos newsgroup and asking
    what kind of car to buy. Well, that would depend on what is important
    to you and how you intend to use it as well as what is your budget.

    How important is portability? The ability to put it in your pocket?
    Do you want interchangable lenses?
    Do you care what kind of batteries, memory cards it uses?
    How much money are you going to spend?
     
    AZ Nomad, Aug 1, 2006
    #2
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  3. bardamu

    m Ransley Guest

    Read comparisons at drpreview and dcresource. If I were to get a new
    camera it would take aa batteries , have a thread for extension lenses
    and take a common card, that rules out the sony. I have a sony w5 but
    would not buy their new model, also there is nothing to grip I have
    dropped my w5. Fuji f30 has a good sensor Panasonic has image
    stabilisation. Olympus has a waterproof model.
     
    m Ransley, Aug 1, 2006
    #3
  4. bardamu

    salgud Guest

    bardamu wrote:
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are getting
    > closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    > cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    > narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it wrong.
    > I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    > For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    > or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    > one? Any other suggestion?
    > I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.
    >
    > Thanks for any help
    >
    > Cheers
    > Phil


    I'm the terribly analytical type, so take my advice with a grain of
    salt if you're not that type. If you are that type, consider me a
    veritable God! :)

    I made up a list of the characteristics that were important to me in a
    digital camera. Then I ranked them. Picture quality was my first
    concern, and I was willing to sacrifice features, portability (size),
    even ease-of-use to some extent, to get better quality pix. So I ranked
    my needs and then went a-hunting. I did a lot of reading and comparing
    to figure out which cameras met my criteria within my price range.
    Actually, I had as much fun shopping for it as using it! This NG is a
    good place to do with specific questions once you know what to ask,
    like about people's experiences with a particular camera and it's
    strong and weak points.

    Hope this helps in your world.
     
    salgud, Aug 1, 2006
    #4
  5. bardamu

    iws Guest

    "bardamu" <> wrote in message
    news:44cfb413$0$23586$...
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are

    getting
    > closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    > cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    > narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it

    wrong.
    > I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    > For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY

    W40
    > or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    > one? Any other suggestion?
    > I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.
    >
    > Thanks for any help
    >
    > Cheers
    > Phil


    Any of these cameras will produce fine images and have automatic and manual
    capability. But their features and prices vary. And you really ought to
    actually hold them in your own hands to see how they "feel." You need to
    decide which features are more important to YOU. That said, these cameras
    differ in size and weight, the types and number of batteries used, optical
    zoom and ISO capability. The canon A620 has a swiveling LCD which can be
    very handy. If you haven't already, check out the reviews at
    http://www.steves-digicams.com/hardware_reviews.html for detailed
    information.
     
    iws, Aug 1, 2006
    #5
  6. bardamu

    SMS Guest

    bardamu wrote:
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are getting
    > closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    > cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    > narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it wrong.
    > I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    > For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    > or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    > one? Any other suggestion?
    > I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.


    Of those, I'd get the Canon A620. The tilt/swivel screen is very useful.

    You can narrow down your choices considerably by eliminating the junk.
    Whatever you buy, ensure that it has an AF assist beam, an optical
    viewfinder, at least a 2" display, SD or CF memory, and the ability to
    use add on lens adapters. Li-Ion batteries are preferred, but at the low
    end you may get stuck with AA batteries.
     
    SMS, Aug 1, 2006
    #6
  7. bardamu

    mike Guest

    Hi

    It also depends on whether anyone else is going to use it.

    I compared the Nikon D50 and the Canon EOS 350, and found the Canon was
    too small for me to handle comfortably.

    I am more than happy with the Nikon. It is easy to use, the manual is
    easy to follow, and the photos are very good.

    Take some time and visit some reputable suppliers. Try them for
    weight, size etc. Also, think about purchasing a large memory card,
    and an extra battery (one in use and one on charge).

    Mike

    bardamu wrote:
    > Hello everybody,
    >
    > I'm to buy my first digital camera in the coming weeks. Holidays are getting
    > closer! The problem is that i'm lost in this "ocean" of different digital
    > cameras. I really don't know which one to choose. Reading reviews, I
    > narrowed down my scope of choice. Yet, i really don't want to get it wrong.
    > I need some experts' advices. Can anyone of you help me?
    > For the moment, I hesitate between a CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    > or 70. Which one would you choose? Which one of these 4 would be the best
    > one? Any other suggestion?
    > I really don't know which one is the best to choose form. I need advices.
    >
    > Thanks for any help
    >
    > Cheers
    > Phil
     
    mike, Aug 2, 2006
    #7
  8. >>Li-Ion batteries are preferred, but at the low end you may get stuck with
    >>AA batteries.

    Which just goes to show how people's requirements can vary. I actually
    eliminated Li-Ion battery cameras from my shopping list and ranked the
    ability to take AAs as a prime requirement.

    The reason is that my main intended use is when out hiking. I always carry
    spare AAs as I need them for my GPS so I have confidence that even if I
    forget (or there's no convenient place) to recharge, I will always have
    spares to hand.

    I did look into procuring spare Li-Ion batteries but they seemed expensive
    and would mean carrying different sizes of spare batteries, and different
    chargers, on my travels.

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Aug 2, 2006
    #8
  9. >>CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40
    I recently chose the Powershot A700 mainly for the 6x optical zoom. It
    doesn't have the tilt and swivel screen of the A620 but that wasn't a
    priority for me (maybe a case of what you've never had you don't miss). The
    other disappointment with all the Canon A series is lack of image
    stabilisation.

    I've had my A700 about a week now and it has lived up to expectations.

    Like others said, though. We would need to know what you want of a camera
    before being able to advise which model would suit you.

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Aug 2, 2006
    #9
  10. bardamu

    SMS Guest

    Keith Sheppard wrote:
    >>> Li-Ion batteries are preferred, but at the low end you may get stuck with
    >>> AA batteries.

    > Which just goes to show how people's requirements can vary. I actually
    > eliminated Li-Ion battery cameras from my shopping list and ranked the
    > ability to take AAs as a prime requirement.
    >
    > The reason is that my main intended use is when out hiking.


    That's my main use too. I want to minimize the hassle when out hiking.
    The camera I take hiking is a small camera, which I use only about every
    two weeks. I can "grab and go" without worrying about batteries, it can
    go for months without being recharged, and the spare battery is very
    small (so small I often have trouble finding it in my pack, but I've onl
    once ever needed it).

    > I always carry
    > spare AAs as I need them for my GPS so I have confidence that even if I
    > forget (or there's no convenient place) to recharge, I will always have
    > spares to hand.


    I can't stand carrying a lot of stuff, and when backpacking I really
    want to get rid of every ounce of weight.

    In fact, I would not mind an AA powered camera for most uses, but for
    hiking and backpacking I would not want one.

    > I did look into procuring spare Li-Ion batteries but they seemed expensive
    > and would mean carrying different sizes of spare batteries, and different
    > chargers, on my travels.


    In reality, a spare Li-Ion battery is about the same price as four good
    AA NiMH cells. It's less than 2x a pack of 4 AA Alkaline batteries
    purchased from a convenience store.
     
    SMS, Aug 2, 2006
    #10
  11. bardamu

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 02 Aug 2006 10:00:12 GMT, Keith Sheppard wrote:

    >>> Li-Ion batteries are preferred, but at the low end you may get stuck with
    >>> AA batteries.

    >
    > Which just goes to show how people's requirements can vary. I actually
    > eliminated Li-Ion battery cameras from my shopping list and ranked the
    > ability to take AAs as a prime requirement.
    >
    > The reason is that my main intended use is when out hiking. I always carry
    > spare AAs as I need them for my GPS so I have confidence that even if I
    > forget (or there's no convenient place) to recharge, I will always have
    > spares to hand.
    >
    > I did look into procuring spare Li-Ion batteries but they seemed expensive
    > and would mean carrying different sizes of spare batteries, and different
    > chargers, on my travels.


    I'm not familiar with GPS units, so I don't know if you use
    alkaline or NiMH batteries in it. If it uses alkalines, the good
    news is that you might not need to use rechargeable batteries with a
    camera such as Canon's A610 or A620. This would depend on the
    length of your hiking trips, but these Canons get up to 1,200 shots
    per set of alkalines, which is more shots than most people take on
    two week vacations. If you prefer using NiMH, they'll be good for
    about 1,700 shots per charge. This assumes outdoor, daytime
    shooting. If you have to use the camera's flash for many of the
    shots, according to Canon's rating, the number of shots declines to
    350 for alkalines and 500 shots per charge for NiMH. Actually, the
    number would be closer to 600, since Canon's rating assumed that
    you'd be using 2,300 mAh NiMH batteries, but 2,700 mAh batteries are
    now available.

    If you use alkaline batteries, and usually bring a flashlight
    along on your hikes, you could use an LED light and it would do
    double duty as a spare battery carrier. Most of the LED lights I've
    seen that use 4 AA alkalines get from 50 to 200 hours from them.
    This would allow you to use the light for a good number of hours and
    the batteries would still be nearly as good as an unused set of
    alkalines as far as the camera or GPS is concerned. Then the
    so-called "dead" alkalines from the GPS or camera could be swapped
    into the LED light, where they'd provide light for another 25 to 100
    hours. Unfortunately this doesn't work quite as well with NiMH
    batteries. The spares in the light would do even better when
    removed and used in the camera or GPS. But the batteries removed
    from the camera would probably only power the light for a few
    minutes before conking out.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 2, 2006
    #11
  12. bardamu

    bardamu Guest

    Thanks a lot, guys, for your input. I'd like to get a camera that works
    reasonnably well in most circomstances (indoors and outdoors,
    landscapes...). I'm not an expert in photography at all, but i like to take
    nice pictures;-)
    I'd like a camera very easy of use. As a really old school boy, i want a
    camera with an viewfinder. The size doesn't really matter. I'd like to get a
    compact camera thought. The optical zoom is important. I would prefer to
    have AA batteries as they could be find anywhere in case of emergency. As
    you see, my requirements are very commonplace as i really don't know
    anything about the technical stuff. I just want a camera that delivers the
    goods, reliable and of good quality.

    A question: is the image stabilisator very important? There's not such as
    thing on the Canon A series. Wouldn't it be necessary with a 6x zoom?
    Wouldn't the pictures be blurry?

    Is there a big difference betwen the A700 and SD700IS. On the one side, i
    like the 6x zoom of the A700(even though a 4x zoom would probably be
    enough), and on the other side i like to size of the SD700IS.
    Any thought about the SD700IS? The reviews I read about it are very
    lukewarm. I know that the perfect camera doesn't exist, but i'm pretty sure,
    it's possible to find a good compromise. The question is, where?

    Philippe



    "Keith Sheppard" <> skrev i melding
    news:5K_zg.64503$...
    > >>CANON POWERSHOT 700, 620 or a SONY W40

    > I recently chose the Powershot A700 mainly for the 6x optical zoom. It
    > doesn't have the tilt and swivel screen of the A620 but that wasn't a
    > priority for me (maybe a case of what you've never had you don't miss).

    The
    > other disappointment with all the Canon A series is lack of image
    > stabilisation.
    >
    > I've had my A700 about a week now and it has lived up to expectations.
    >
    > Like others said, though. We would need to know what you want of a camera
    > before being able to advise which model would suit you.
    >
    > Keith
    >
    >
    >
     
    bardamu, Aug 2, 2006
    #12
  13. bardamu wrote:
    []
    > A question: is the image stabilisator very important? There's not
    > such as thing on the Canon A series. Wouldn't it be necessary with a
    > 6x zoom? Wouldn't the pictures be blurry?


    It's a matter of degree. With the 432mm lenses of a typical 12X zoom
    camera, in less than perfect lighting it is useful to be able to shoot at
    the 1/40s that an image stabilised lens system allows, rather than the
    1/400s which would otherwise be required to stop blur from camera shake.
    On the other hand, I have found that I can hand-hold a digital camera with
    a 24mm lens at 1/10s or even more, and still get an acceptably sharp
    picture. If you use a good tripod all the time, you will always avoid the
    effects of camera shake.

    I would suggest that if you are interested in telephoto pictures (and I
    would just include 6X zoom as telephoto), an image stabilised lens is a
    worthwhile thing to have on your camera, but you could manage without. As
    for me, I have an IS camera (Panasonic FZ5) and have never regretted
    buying it.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Aug 2, 2006
    #13
  14. bardamu

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 2 Aug 2006 21:01:26 +0200, bardamu wrote:

    > A question: is the image stabilisator very important? There's not such as
    > thing on the Canon A series. Wouldn't it be necessary with a 6x zoom?
    > Wouldn't the pictures be blurry?


    The review at dpreview.com of Canon's A700 touches on when the
    image stabilizer would be helpful/necessary. The short answer is
    that it helps more with longer lenses, and on a bright sunny day
    probably isn't really needed except at longer tele focal lengths.
    So for some shots where the A620's 3x lens might not need IS at any
    zoom position of its lens, in situations requiring the same
    exposure, the A700's lens might benefit by IS when zoomed way out.

    With less light IS is more valuable, but doesn't solve all
    problems. In low light, while it will allow you to take handheld
    shots with less camera shake (note - it doesn't eliminate shake, but
    reduces it), it does so by allowing you to get by with a slower
    shutter speed. But that long shutter speed won't do you much good
    if your subjects are moving. That's why for the best low light
    photography DSLRs do better than P&S cameras even if they don't have
    IS. They allow shutter speeds to be shortened by having faster
    (larger aperture) lenses, and also by being able to take usable
    pictures at much higher ISO levels. And if they have IS, they'll do
    even better. As the shutter speed gets longer, at a certain point
    IS won't help any longer because it won't be able to cope with gross
    hand movement. This also depends on the focal length that is used
    and on the photographer, as some can hold the camera steadier than
    others. Maybe ex-fighter Roberto Duran would make a good low light
    photographer. :)



    > Is there a big difference betwen the A700 and SD700IS. On the one side, i
    > like the 6x zoom of the A700(even though a 4x zoom would probably be
    > enough), and on the other side i like to size of the SD700IS.
    > Any thought about the SD700IS? The reviews I read about it are very
    > lukewarm. I know that the perfect camera doesn't exist, but i'm pretty sure,
    > it's possible to find a good compromise. The question is, where?


    Not the right question. Both of these cameras represent good
    compromises. But so do most other cameras. The question might
    better be, which represents the best compromise for a particular
    photographer. For me, it would be either the A620 or the A700. But
    that would be best for me *now*. A year ago or a year or two from
    now a camera similar to the SD700IS might be more what I'd want.
    Only you can know which camera would represent the best compromise.
    The bad news is that because, as you said, you're "not an expert in
    photography at all" you probably lack the experience to make that
    determination. The good news is that even if you don't make the
    best choice initially, it won't make that much of a difference.
    Most of the shots that you could take with one camera would be
    easily gotten with the other camera, and vice-versa.

    Most people that have been taking pictures for X number of years
    have bought Y number of cameras. By the time you start looking for
    your second camera you'll have a *much* better idea as to which
    camera would suit you best. And if you're like most of us, that
    time will arrive sooner than you think. :) But when you do get to
    that point, don't think that the first camera will no longer serve
    any purpose. Maybe it won't most of the time. But if any
    situations arise where getting the shot is really important,
    especially if it's a one-time opportunity, you'll be best served by
    having your old camera nearby as an emergency backup. And by the
    way, if my backup camera was rarely used (for instance once every
    year or two), you and the camera would be much better off if it uses
    AA batteries. Rechargeable batteries don't survive very well if
    you let them sit for a year or two between charges. And if they
    died because it was too much hassle to give them a brief charge
    every 4 or 5 months, paying a dollar or so for a set of alkalines
    would go down much easier than paying much more for a rechargeable
    battery (whether NiMH AAs or Li-Ion) that may never be used again
    after this one event.
     
    ASAAR, Aug 3, 2006
    #14
  15. bardamu

    iws Guest

    "ASAAR" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 2 Aug 2006 21:01:26 +0200, bardamu wrote:
    >
    > > A question: is the image stabilisator very important? There's not such

    as
    > > thing on the Canon A series. Wouldn't it be necessary with a 6x zoom?
    > > Wouldn't the pictures be blurry?

    >
    > The review at dpreview.com of Canon's A700 touches on when the
    > image stabilizer would be helpful/necessary. The short answer is
    > that it helps more with longer lenses, and on a bright sunny day
    > probably isn't really needed except at longer tele focal lengths.
    > So for some shots where the A620's 3x lens might not need IS at any
    > zoom position of its lens, in situations requiring the same
    > exposure, the A700's lens might benefit by IS when zoomed way out.


    The A620 actually has a 4X zoom. The 6X of the A700 would certainly benefit
    from IS when zoomed out fully but in my experience, the vast majority of
    casual shots are taken at less than 2X. Indeed, there are many times I'd
    love to have a wider angle than available at the typical 1X (35mm/35 mm
    equivalent on the A620 and 700). I have to say that the pivotting LCD on the
    A620 allows you more confidence in taking shots over the heads in a crowd
    and other awkward positions such as a mini tripod on the ground. As a first
    camera, the A620 will save you about $80-90 in the US over the A700 which is
    a newer model.
     
    iws, Aug 3, 2006
    #15
  16. bardamu

    ASAAR Guest

    On Wed, 2 Aug 2006 16:48:23 -0700, iws wrote:

    >> The review at dpreview.com of Canon's A700 touches on when the
    >> image stabilizer would be helpful/necessary. The short answer is
    >> that it helps more with longer lenses, and on a bright sunny day
    >> probably isn't really needed except at longer tele focal lengths.
    >> So for some shots where the A620's 3x lens might not need IS at any
    >> zoom position of its lens, in situations requiring the same
    >> exposure, the A700's lens might benefit by IS when zoomed way out.

    >
    > The A620 actually has a 4X zoom.


    Ah, how quickly did I forget . . .


    > The 6X of the A700 would certainly benefit
    > from IS when zoomed out fully but in my experience, the vast majority of
    > casual shots are taken at less than 2X.


    That's consistent with what the review had to say.


    > Indeed, there are many times I'd love to have a wider angle than available
    > at the typical 1X (35mm/35 mm equivalent on the A620 and 700).


    You, I, many reviewers and many other photographers feel this way.
    I guess it's too small a percentage of camera buyers to influence
    manufacturers into doing the right thing. :)
     
    ASAAR, Aug 3, 2006
    #16
  17. http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/CanonSD700IS/
    m Ransley wrote:
    > Read comparisons at drpreview and dcresource. If I were to get a new
    > camera it would take aa batteries , have a thread for extension lenses
    > and take a common card, that rules out the sony. I have a sony w5 but
    > would not buy their new model, also there is nothing to grip I have
    > dropped my w5. Fuji f30 has a good sensor Panasonic has image
    > stabilisation. Olympus has a waterproof model.
     
    silverthreads, Aug 3, 2006
    #17
  18. bardamu

    iws Guest

    "ASAAR" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 2 Aug 2006 16:48:23 -0700, iws wrote:
    >
    > > Indeed, there are many times I'd love to have a wider angle than

    available
    > > at the typical 1X (35mm/35 mm equivalent on the A620 and 700).

    >
    > You, I, many reviewers and many other photographers feel this way.
    > I guess it's too small a percentage of camera buyers to influence
    > manufacturers into doing the right thing. :)
    >

    It can be quite frustrating at times. My old Minolta Maxxum SLR came with a
    50mm lens which I almost never used in favor of a 28-85 mm zoom. The latter
    was extremely versatile and handled about 95% of all my shots. My last
    non-digital camera is a great little Minolta Explorer EX with a 28-75 zoom
    and at least half the casual shots are taken at full wide-angle. I guess the
    casual photographer falls for the lure of the "bigger" zoom not realizing
    that the nuisance of asking family members to crowd closer together so
    he/she can "get them all in" would be greatly alleviated if there was a
    moderate wide-angle (28mm/35mm equivalent) at the low end of a "smaller" 3X
    zoom.
     
    iws, Aug 3, 2006
    #18
  19. bardamu

    SMS Guest

    iws wrote:

    > The A620 actually has a 4X zoom. The 6X of the A700 would certainly benefit
    > from IS when zoomed out fully but in my experience, the vast majority of
    > casual shots are taken at less than 2X. Indeed, there are many times I'd
    > love to have a wider angle than available at the typical 1X (35mm/35 mm
    > equivalent on the A620 and 700).


    Look at:

    Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX2 (28mm - 112mm)
    Samsung Digimax L55W (28mm - 135mm)

    Alas, no camera is perfect, and both of these have drawbacks,
    specifically the lack of an optical viewfinder eliminates them from
    consideration.
     
    SMS, Aug 3, 2006
    #19
  20. >>I have to say that the pivotting LCD on the
    >>A620 allows you more confidence in taking shots...
    >>...and other awkward positions such as a mini tripod
    >>on the ground

    Never thought of that. I always thought standing on my head or lying down
    on the wet grass was an integral part of the process ;)

    Keith
     
    Keith Sheppard, Aug 3, 2006
    #20
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