which certificate should I pursue?

Discussion in 'Microsoft Certification' started by Janice, Jun 21, 2005.

  1. Janice

    Janice Guest

    I would like to accomplish a few tasks as the following:
    1> be able to develop WinXP application
    2> understand the WinXP OS, like how the OS kills the orphan process,
    queueing...., not the detail in MCSE.
    3> understand the computer virus and trojan.
    4> understand the knowledge of WinXP security facilities, again not only the
    user interface.
    Which certificates should I pursue?
    Thanx
    Janice, Jun 21, 2005
    #1
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  2. Janice

    T-Bone Guest

    "Janice" <> wrote
    > I would like to accomplish a few tasks as the following:

    <snip>
    > Which certificates should I pursue?


    I think you are putting that cart before the horse. I would check out the
    kinds of jobs you want and look at what kind of certifications they require.
    It doesn't matter what certs you *have*, because if you don't have the certs
    they *want* then your resume won't get past the HR filters.

    What you are asking for sound like the kinds of things covered by college
    courses, not certification. Other than that, check out the Microsoft
    certification site. There is a pretty good overview there of what the
    different certifications cover.
    --
    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
    T-Bone, Jun 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. Janice

    Janice Guest

    College courses do not cover that in detail.
    I want it specific for Windows product, not the basic operating concept.

    "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    :%...
    > "Janice" <> wrote
    > > I would like to accomplish a few tasks as the following:

    > <snip>
    > > Which certificates should I pursue?

    >
    > I think you are putting that cart before the horse. I would check out the
    > kinds of jobs you want and look at what kind of certifications they

    require.
    > It doesn't matter what certs you *have*, because if you don't have the

    certs
    > they *want* then your resume won't get past the HR filters.
    >
    > What you are asking for sound like the kinds of things covered by college
    > courses, not certification. Other than that, check out the Microsoft
    > certification site. There is a pretty good overview there of what the
    > different certifications cover.
    > --
    > T-Bone
    > MCNGP XL
    >
    >
    Janice, Jun 21, 2005
    #3
  4. college courses are mostly joke in comparsion I should know I am doing both
    cert and college at the same time.

    Never the less it sounds like MCAD/MCSD is best for you which is the track I
    am on. Windows OS particulars are covered but not so much networking. Viruses
    are basically applications and how they access network. The network
    particulars is something touched on a bit on this track but not in extreem
    detail. Nothing that a few books couldnt cover for your personal intrest.

    Application security is covered in MCAD/MCSD and everything in that area is
    at least touched on. Thus you can read more for personal once you get the
    basics.
    I personally want to specialize in XML so my personal extra learning is
    going to be that.

    "Janice" wrote:

    > College courses do not cover that in detail.
    > I want it specific for Windows product, not the basic operating concept.
    >
    > "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    > :%...
    > > "Janice" <> wrote
    > > > I would like to accomplish a few tasks as the following:

    > > <snip>
    > > > Which certificates should I pursue?

    > >
    > > I think you are putting that cart before the horse. I would check out the
    > > kinds of jobs you want and look at what kind of certifications they

    > require.
    > > It doesn't matter what certs you *have*, because if you don't have the

    > certs
    > > they *want* then your resume won't get past the HR filters.
    > >
    > > What you are asking for sound like the kinds of things covered by college
    > > courses, not certification. Other than that, check out the Microsoft
    > > certification site. There is a pretty good overview there of what the
    > > different certifications cover.
    > > --
    > > T-Bone
    > > MCNGP XL
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Jun 23, 2005
    #4
  5. Janice

    T-Bone Guest

    "Janice" <> wrote
    > College courses do not cover that in detail.
    > I want it specific for Windows product, not the basic operating concept.


    The reason I recommended college over MS training courses for certification
    was that MS courses assume you already know the products and will just teach
    you what you need to know to pass the exams. In addition, if you want to
    learn to develop applications, you are better off with a programming course.
    --
    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
    T-Bone, Jun 23, 2005
    #5
  6. Janice

    Janice Guest

    How those MVP can be so familiar with the WinXP OS?
    I dont think they just take MCSE and get all the knowledge.
    I am also a MCSE, and I feel I cannot troubleshoot the problem.
    Thanx

    "Sean" <> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    :...
    > college courses are mostly joke in comparsion I should know I am doing

    both
    > cert and college at the same time.
    >
    > Never the less it sounds like MCAD/MCSD is best for you which is the track

    I
    > am on. Windows OS particulars are covered but not so much networking.

    Viruses
    > are basically applications and how they access network. The network
    > particulars is something touched on a bit on this track but not in extreem
    > detail. Nothing that a few books couldnt cover for your personal intrest.
    >
    > Application security is covered in MCAD/MCSD and everything in that area

    is
    > at least touched on. Thus you can read more for personal once you get the
    > basics.
    > I personally want to specialize in XML so my personal extra learning is
    > going to be that.
    >
    > "Janice" wrote:
    >
    > > College courses do not cover that in detail.
    > > I want it specific for Windows product, not the basic operating concept.
    > >
    > > "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ???gco?l¢Do¡Ps?D
    > > :%...
    > > > "Janice" <> wrote
    > > > > I would like to accomplish a few tasks as the following:
    > > > <snip>
    > > > > Which certificates should I pursue?
    > > >
    > > > I think you are putting that cart before the horse. I would check out

    the
    > > > kinds of jobs you want and look at what kind of certifications they

    > > require.
    > > > It doesn't matter what certs you *have*, because if you don't have the

    > > certs
    > > > they *want* then your resume won't get past the HR filters.
    > > >
    > > > What you are asking for sound like the kinds of things covered by

    college
    > > > courses, not certification. Other than that, check out the Microsoft
    > > > certification site. There is a pretty good overview there of what the
    > > > different certifications cover.
    > > > --
    > > > T-Bone
    > > > MCNGP XL
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > >
    Janice, Jun 24, 2005
    #6
  7. Janice

    T-Bone Guest

    "Janice" <> wrote
    > How those MVP can be so familiar with the WinXP OS?
    > I dont think they just take MCSE and get all the knowledge.
    > I am also a MCSE, and I feel I cannot troubleshoot the problem.
    > Thanx


    Okay, if you had told us in the first place you were already an MCSE then
    you might have got a different answer.

    In any case, the reason we (not the we are all MVPs) can be so familiar with
    the OS is because we work with it extensively on a daily basis and face all
    the problems, hiccups, burps, and other personified traits it has thrown at
    us. Certification<>knowledge, at least in the Microsoft world. It experience
    that counts.
    --
    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
    T-Bone, Jun 24, 2005
    #7
  8. Janice

    Janice Guest

    Then how can I get the knowledge, if there is not a formal textbook teaching
    these secret work around?
    Thanx


    "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    :...
    > "Janice" <> wrote
    > > How those MVP can be so familiar with the WinXP OS?
    > > I dont think they just take MCSE and get all the knowledge.
    > > I am also a MCSE, and I feel I cannot troubleshoot the problem.
    > > Thanx

    >
    > Okay, if you had told us in the first place you were already an MCSE then
    > you might have got a different answer.
    >
    > In any case, the reason we (not the we are all MVPs) can be so familiar

    with
    > the OS is because we work with it extensively on a daily basis and face

    all
    > the problems, hiccups, burps, and other personified traits it has thrown

    at
    > us. Certification<>knowledge, at least in the Microsoft world. It

    experience
    > that counts.
    > --
    > T-Bone
    > MCNGP XL
    >
    >
    Janice, Jun 25, 2005
    #8
  9. Janice

    T-Bone Guest

    "Janice" <> wrote
    > Then how can I get the knowledge, if there is not a formal textbook

    teaching
    > these secret work around?


    Like I said, experience. With experience you get better at knowing the
    answers, and also where to find the answers to the problems you can't solve
    on your own. Sometimes its faster to look up an answer on google to see if
    the same problem has happened to anyone else rather than do a hundred
    troubleshooting steps.
    --
    T-Bone
    MCNGP XL
    T-Bone, Jun 27, 2005
    #9
  10. If you are in the states, try to get a job with Microsoft PSS. You will
    learn a lot more than you ever thought possible if you can land a PSS slot
    (most of them are held by Volt...www.volt.com).

    Other than that, start reading
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/default.mspx

    From there you can move onto the MSDN sites.

    ....as for the MVPs...start researching the answers to questions and answer
    ~2-5 questions per day at 1-3 hours of research.

    Grab a packet sniffer (www.ethereal.com) and start looking at packets going
    in and out of your home (not an office where they have rules against this)
    system.
    "Janice" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Then how can I get the knowledge, if there is not a formal textbook
    > teaching
    > these secret work around?
    > Thanx
    >
    >
    > "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    > :...
    >> "Janice" <> wrote
    >> > How those MVP can be so familiar with the WinXP OS?
    >> > I dont think they just take MCSE and get all the knowledge.
    >> > I am also a MCSE, and I feel I cannot troubleshoot the problem.
    >> > Thanx

    >>
    >> Okay, if you had told us in the first place you were already an MCSE then
    >> you might have got a different answer.
    >>
    >> In any case, the reason we (not the we are all MVPs) can be so familiar

    > with
    >> the OS is because we work with it extensively on a daily basis and face

    > all
    >> the problems, hiccups, burps, and other personified traits it has thrown

    > at
    >> us. Certification<>knowledge, at least in the Microsoft world. It

    > experience
    >> that counts.
    >> --
    >> T-Bone
    >> MCNGP XL
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    Bob Christian, Jun 30, 2005
    #10
  11. Here is the deal about college courses and most likely any other "courses".

    You are given books, you read them, read them again, take the test, get an A.

    I have some 120 college hours behind me and I have never taken a class that
    I couldnt have made the same grade by simply reading the text in question.
    Only times that was not the case was when the lecturer said he/she would
    mention material in class that is not in the text, which naturally if he/she
    wrote it down I would even have to go to class for that, and I am an A
    student...;)

    There is my 2 cents, ironic thing is I have been thinking of being an MCT


    "Janice" wrote:

    > Then how can I get the knowledge, if there is not a formal textbook teaching
    > these secret work around?
    > Thanx
    >
    >
    > "T-Bone" <reply2me@thenewsgroup> ¼¶¼g©ó¶l¥ó·s»D
    > :...
    > > "Janice" <> wrote
    > > > How those MVP can be so familiar with the WinXP OS?
    > > > I dont think they just take MCSE and get all the knowledge.
    > > > I am also a MCSE, and I feel I cannot troubleshoot the problem.
    > > > Thanx

    > >
    > > Okay, if you had told us in the first place you were already an MCSE then
    > > you might have got a different answer.
    > >
    > > In any case, the reason we (not the we are all MVPs) can be so familiar

    > with
    > > the OS is because we work with it extensively on a daily basis and face

    > all
    > > the problems, hiccups, burps, and other personified traits it has thrown

    > at
    > > us. Certification<>knowledge, at least in the Microsoft world. It

    > experience
    > > that counts.
    > > --
    > > T-Bone
    > > MCNGP XL
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Jul 8, 2005
    #11
  12. Rarely if ever does a course cover material not in the books assigned to the
    class.
    Read the book, save some money, save time driving to and from class.

    There are books for every level under the sun and almost everything known to
    mankind is written down somewhere just need to find it.

    College is only good for credentials because it’s hard to prove you have
    read a bunch of books. In some cases one class in a specific technology can
    get you a job but it doesn’t teach you anymore then you can learn on your own.
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Jul 12, 2005
    #12
  13. Janice

    EggHead Guest

    haha, the problem is that it apply to cert as well.
    Are you sure all courses material are in the books?
    In my last college yr, most of my courses material are from the web. My
    prof. does not post them to his course's web site. He wants us to go to his
    stupid class :(
    It is truth that it is easy to get a job if you have what they want. That is
    why there is "Major"?
    Egghead

    "Sean" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Rarely if ever does a course cover material not in the books assigned to
    > the
    > class.
    > Read the book, save some money, save time driving to and from class.
    >
    > There are books for every level under the sun and almost everything known
    > to
    > mankind is written down somewhere just need to find it.
    >
    > College is only good for credentials because it¡¦s hard to prove you have
    > read a bunch of books. In some cases one class in a specific technology
    > can
    > get you a job but it doesn¡¦t teach you anymore then you can learn on your
    > own.
    >
    EggHead, Jul 20, 2005
    #13
  14. Well I am MCAD and never took a cert class so I am guessing yes.

    Besides this stuff is far to technical to not be written down somewhere
    however it can be a mother to find sometimes. Took me 20 hours to find 1 line
    of code I needed becuase what I was looking for could not be typed into a
    search engine. I am 100% certian my college profs wouldnt have known either
    but that is most likely becuase I go to LoserU

    "EggHead" wrote:

    > haha, the problem is that it apply to cert as well.
    > Are you sure all courses material are in the books?
    > In my last college yr, most of my courses material are from the web. My
    > prof. does not post them to his course's web site. He wants us to go to his
    > stupid class :(
    > It is truth that it is easy to get a job if you have what they want. That is
    > why there is "Major"?
    > Egghead
    >
    > "Sean" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Rarely if ever does a course cover material not in the books assigned to
    > > the
    > > class.
    > > Read the book, save some money, save time driving to and from class.
    > >
    > > There are books for every level under the sun and almost everything known
    > > to
    > > mankind is written down somewhere just need to find it.
    > >
    > > College is only good for credentials because it¡¦s hard to prove you have
    > > read a bunch of books. In some cases one class in a specific technology
    > > can
    > > get you a job but it doesn¡¦t teach you anymore then you can learn on your
    > > own.
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    =?Utf-8?B?U2Vhbg==?=, Jul 21, 2005
    #14
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