where's Firefox 1.5 for British-English ? ( whinge, moan, whinge)

Discussion in 'Firefox' started by falsename, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. falsename

    falsename Guest

    lots of versions of Firefox are now out
    but not British-English, which is stuck at 1.0.7

    excuse me while I moan and whinge

    moan, whinge, moan, whinge, rant, complain, whinge, moan

    thank you for that
    normal service will now resume
    ( when we find out what is "normal" anyway )
     
    falsename, Dec 5, 2005
    #1
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  2. falsename

    norm Guest

    Re: where's Firefox 1.5 for British-English ? ( whinge, moan, whinge )

    On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 18:44:10 +0000, falsename
    <> wrote:

    >lots of versions of Firefox are now out
    >but not British-English, which is stuck at 1.0.7
    >
    >excuse me while I moan and whinge
    >
    >moan, whinge, moan, whinge, rant, complain, whinge, moan
    >
    >thank you for that
    >normal service will now resume
    >( when we find out what is "normal" anyway )


    Couldnt find English - american either?
     
    norm, Dec 5, 2005
    #2
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  3. norm wrote:
    > On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 18:44:10 +0000, falsename
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> lots of versions of Firefox are now out
    >> but not British-English, which is stuck at 1.0.7
    >>
    >> excuse me while I moan and whinge
    >>
    >> moan, whinge, moan, whinge, rant, complain, whinge, moan
    >>
    >> thank you for that
    >> normal service will now resume
    >> ( when we find out what is "normal" anyway )

    >
    > Couldnt find English - american either?


    http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/

    Just click the download button. What's downloaded is en-us.

    As I understand it, en-gb is due out in a second run of localizations,
    hopefully before the end of this week, though don't quote me on it. ;)

    Lee
     
    Leonidas Jones, Dec 5, 2005
    #3
  4. falsename

    Jedi Fans Guest

    On 05/12/05 20:18, norm scribbled:
    > On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 18:44:10 +0000, falsename
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >> lots of versions of Firefox are now out
    >> but not British-English, which is stuck at 1.0.7
    >>
    >> excuse me while I moan and whinge
    >>
    >> moan, whinge, moan, whinge, rant, complain, whinge, moan
    >>
    >> thank you for that
    >> normal service will now resume
    >> ( when we find out what is "normal" anyway )

    >
    > Couldnt find English - american either?

    American English is a lot different to British English.

    --
    Hope This Helped and MTFBWY...
    Kieren aka JediFans - <URL:http://jedifans.com/>
    The Force Is With Me, SUSE Linux 10.0, Mozilla Firefox 1.5 RC2,
    Mozilla Thunderbird 1.5 RC1 and Revenge Of The Sith!
     
    Jedi Fans, Dec 6, 2005
    #4
  5. > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >


    Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they are
    on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!

    ;)

    Bryan
     
    Bryan Harrison, Dec 6, 2005
    #5
  6. Leonidas Jones schreef:
    > norm wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 05 Dec 2005 18:44:10 +0000, falsename
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> lots of versions of Firefox are now out
    >>> but not British-English, which is stuck at 1.0.7
    >>>
    >>> excuse me while I moan and whinge
    >>>
    >>> moan, whinge, moan, whinge, rant, complain, whinge, moan
    >>>
    >>> thank you for that
    >>> normal service will now resume
    >>> ( when we find out what is "normal" anyway )

    >>
    >>
    >> Couldnt find English - american either?

    >
    >
    > http://www.mozilla.com/firefox/
    >
    > Just click the download button. What's downloaded is en-us.
    >
    > As I understand it, en-gb is due out in a second run of localizations,
    > hopefully before the end of this week, though don't quote me on it. ;)


    Indeed there was a blocker bug that still needed to be fixed in en-GB,
    due out soon.

    --
    Hendrik Maryns

    ==================
    www.lieverleven.be
    http://aouw.org
     
    Hendrik Maryns, Dec 6, 2005
    #6
  7. falsename

    gwtc Guest

    Bryan Harrison wrote:

    > > American English is a lot different to British English.
    > >

    >
    > Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they are
    > on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >
    > ;)
    >
    > Bryan
    >

    The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in Canada
    and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.
     
    gwtc, Dec 6, 2005
    #7
  8. falsename

    falsename Guest

    gwtc wrote:
    > Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >
    >> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they are
    >> on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>
    >> ;)
    >>
    >> Bryan
    >>

    > The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in Canada
    > and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.



    I refuse to use a language in which it is acceptable and normal
    for men to wear "suspenders"...
     
    falsename, Dec 6, 2005
    #8
  9. gwtc wrote:
    > Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >
    >> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >> >

    >>
    >> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they are
    >> on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>
    >> ;)
    >>
    >> Bryan
    >>

    > The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in Canada
    > and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.



    I think this is really funny. My native language
    is Dutch and I live in The Netherlands, but I
    don't mind to read US-English or UK-English. To
    me it's almost the same ;)

    Paula
     
    Dustyfan nieuws, Dec 6, 2005
    #9
  10. Dustyfan nieuws wrote:
    > gwtc wrote:
    >> Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >>
    >>> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >>> >
    >>>
    >>> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they
    >>> are on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>>
    >>> ;)
    >>>
    >>> Bryan
    >>>

    >> The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in Canada
    >> and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.

    >
    >
    > I think this is really funny. My native language is Dutch and I live in
    > The Netherlands, but I don't mind to read US-English or UK-English. To
    > me it's almost the same ;)
    >
    > Paula


    As the saying goes, "Two nations divided by a common language"! :)

    Lee
     
    Leonidas Jones, Dec 6, 2005
    #10
  11. falsename

    WSP Guest

    Leonidas Jones wrote:
    > Dustyfan nieuws wrote:
    >> gwtc wrote:
    >>> Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >>>> >
    >>>>
    >>>> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they
    >>>> are on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>>>
    >>>> ;)
    >>>>
    >>>> Bryan
    >>>>
    >>> The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in Canada
    >>> and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.

    >>
    >>
    >> I think this is really funny. My native language is Dutch and I live
    >> in The Netherlands, but I don't mind to read US-English or UK-English.
    >> To me it's almost the same ;)
    >>
    >> Paula

    >
    > As the saying goes, "Two nations divided by a common language"! :)
    >
    > Lee


    Paula
    We think it is a source of fun as well. We enjoy taking stripes off each
    other in good natured banter. Actually, Brits love US & Canadian folk
    and tolerate their bad use of our language!
    ps we also love the Dutch because they speak perfect English (saves us
    having to learn Dutch!).

    Nollaig Cridheil agus Bliadhna Mhath Ur
    WSP

    --
    OOo 2.0.1 – SeaMonkey 1.5a/1.0b (nightlies...) - Win XP sp2
    ==============================================
    http://george-best.gonetoosoon.co.uk/
    ==============================
    http://www.answersingenesis.org/
     
    WSP, Dec 6, 2005
    #11
  12. WSP schreef:
    > Leonidas Jones wrote:
    >
    >> Dustyfan nieuws wrote:
    >>
    >>> gwtc wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >>>>> >
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they
    >>>>> are on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ;)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Bryan
    >>>>>
    >>>> The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in
    >>>> Canada and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I think this is really funny. My native language is Dutch and I live
    >>> in The Netherlands, but I don't mind to read US-English or
    >>> UK-English. To me it's almost the same ;)
    >>>
    >>> Paula

    >>
    >>
    >> As the saying goes, "Two nations divided by a common language"! :)
    >>
    >> Lee

    >
    >
    > Paula
    > We think it is a source of fun as well. We enjoy taking stripes off each
    > other in good natured banter. Actually, Brits love US & Canadian folk
    > and tolerate their bad use of our language!
    > ps we also love the Dutch because they speak perfect English (saves us
    > having to learn Dutch!).


    Dunglish, you probably mean... http://www.dunglish.nl/

    Cheers, H.

    --
    Hendrik Maryns

    ==================
    www.lieverleven.be
    http://aouw.org
     
    Hendrik Maryns, Dec 7, 2005
    #12
  13. falsename

    WSP Guest

    Hendrik Maryns wrote:
    > WSP schreef:
    >> Leonidas Jones wrote:
    >>
    >>> Dustyfan nieuws wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> gwtc wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >>>>>> >
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what they
    >>>>>> are on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> ;)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Bryan
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in
    >>>>> Canada and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I think this is really funny. My native language is Dutch and I live
    >>>> in The Netherlands, but I don't mind to read US-English or
    >>>> UK-English. To me it's almost the same ;)
    >>>>
    >>>> Paula
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> As the saying goes, "Two nations divided by a common language"! :)
    >>>
    >>> Lee

    >>
    >>
    >> Paula
    >> We think it is a source of fun as well. We enjoy taking stripes off
    >> each other in good natured banter. Actually, Brits love US & Canadian
    >> folk and tolerate their bad use of our language!
    >> ps we also love the Dutch because they speak perfect English (saves us
    >> having to learn Dutch!).

    >
    > Dunglish, you probably mean... http://www.dunglish.nl/
    >
    > Cheers, H.
    >

    Mijn vriend, heeft u mijn Nederlands niet gehoord.

    --
    OOo 2.0.1 – SeaMonkey 1.5a/1.0b (nightlies...) - Win XP sp2
    ==============================================
    http://george-best.gonetoosoon.co.uk/
    ==============================
    http://www.answersingenesis.org/
     
    WSP, Dec 7, 2005
    #13
  14. WSP schreef:
    > Hendrik Maryns wrote:
    >
    >> WSP schreef:
    >>
    >>> Leonidas Jones wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Dustyfan nieuws wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> gwtc wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Bryan Harrison wrote:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> > American English is a lot different to British English.
    >>>>>>> >
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Sure is. When they use "color" or "honor" I have no idea what
    >>>>>>> they are on about. "Faucet", "Diaper"? Help !!!
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> ;)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Bryan
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> The one that gets me is the Bonnet and Boot on a car. Here in
    >>>>>> Canada and the US we refer to them as the Hood and the Trunk.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I think this is really funny. My native language is Dutch and I
    >>>>> live in The Netherlands, but I don't mind to read US-English or
    >>>>> UK-English. To me it's almost the same ;)
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Paula
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> As the saying goes, "Two nations divided by a common language"! :)
    >>>>
    >>>> Lee
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Paula
    >>> We think it is a source of fun as well. We enjoy taking stripes off
    >>> each other in good natured banter. Actually, Brits love US & Canadian
    >>> folk and tolerate their bad use of our language!
    >>> ps we also love the Dutch because they speak perfect English (saves
    >>> us having to learn Dutch!).

    >>
    >>
    >> Dunglish, you probably mean... http://www.dunglish.nl/
    >>
    >> Cheers, H.
    >>

    > Mijn vriend, heeft u mijn Nederlands niet gehoord.


    Neen, but it is a general laugh between linguists that the Dutch (and
    Flemish) think they speak English very well (and I am wagering my words
    here, because I am one of them), but they make a lot of typical
    word-to-word translation errors. Steenkolenengels, we call it (coal
    English, refering to the early days of the European Union).

    Groett, H.
    --
    Hendrik Maryns

    ==================
    www.lieverleven.be
    http://aouw.org
     
    Hendrik Maryns, Dec 7, 2005
    #14
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