where to buy non reflective glass?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bucky, Aug 26, 2005.

  1. Bucky

    Bucky Guest

    I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    reflective glass. Where do I get that?

    And what exactly is it? Is it just regular glass with an antireflective
    coating? Or is it some kind of special glass? Or is it some of plastic
    or polycarbonate?
     
    Bucky, Aug 26, 2005
    #1
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  2. On 26 Aug 2005 11:01:33 -0700, "Bucky" <> wrote:

    >I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    >to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    >reflective glass. Where do I get that?
    >
    >And what exactly is it? Is it just regular glass with an antireflective
    >coating? Or is it some kind of special glass? Or is it some of plastic
    >or polycarbonate?


    Glass is Glass not polycarbonate. Go see you local frame shop they
    can sell it to you.


    ******************************************************

    "I have been a witness, and these pictures are
    my testimony. The events I have recorded should
    not be forgotten and must not be repeated."

    -James Nachtwey-
    http://www.jamesnachtwey.com/
     
    John A. Stovall, Aug 26, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bucky

    Beach Bum Guest

    > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > reflective glass. Where do I get that?


    The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should /not/ touch
    the glass. You should mount the photos with non-acidic mat board and back
    them with non-acidic foam core or other archival quality mounting board.
    Beware of framing in wood without protecting the papers from it. There's
    more to the process than I have time to post - it's worth spending $15 on a
    good book or reading up online.

    All this effort and expense will not mean much if you aren't printing on
    archival quality paper with archival quality inks. A tip - prints you get
    from Walmart aren't archival quality.

    One thing to consider - the actual archival of the digital file is more
    valuable than trying to achieve archival quality mounting/framing. You can
    always reprint the image, cut a new mat from the dimensions of the old one.
    Whole process probably takes 20 minutes per image every 5 years or so. You
    probably need to pull the frames to clean out the bugs every 2 or 3 years
    anyway.

    Now to answer your original question - you should consider getting UV
    protective plexi-glass. It's lighter, not very breakable, easier to work
    with than glass. The only down side is it can be scratched if not handled
    carefully. But if the plexi was going to be scratched, a glass glaze would
    probably break - that can scratch or otherwise damage the print. The
    ultimate purpose for the glaze is to protect the print and IMO plexi does a
    better job than glass.

    Michaels has most supplies you'll ever need to get started and their staff
    is quite helpful.

    http://www.michaels.com/art/online/home

    BTW, a book I recommend on framing/matting/archiving:

    "Picture Perfect Framing" by Katie DuMont

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...102-5412086-9550522?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/7mj9h



    Good luck and have fun! :)

    --
    Mark

    Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    http://www.marklauter.com
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 26, 2005
    #3
  4. Bucky

    Bucky Guest

    Beach Bum wrote:
    > The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should /not/ touch
    > the glass. You should mount the photos with non-acidic mat board and back
    > them with non-acidic foam core or other archival quality mounting board.


    Are we talking about the same thing? By "archiving" I meant that I was
    using my digital camera as a scanner to convert previously printed
    photos into digital files.
     
    Bucky, Aug 26, 2005
    #4
  5. Bucky

    critcher Guest

    "Beach Bum" <> wrote in message
    news:flJPe.66277$...
    >> I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    >> to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    >> reflective glass. Where do I get that?

    >
    > The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should /not/
    > touch
    > the glass. You should mount the photos with non-acidic mat board and back
    > them with non-acidic foam core or other archival quality mounting board.
    > Beware of framing in wood without protecting the papers from it. There's
    > more to the process than I have time to post - it's worth spending $15 on
    > a
    > good book or reading up online.
    >
    > All this effort and expense will not mean much if you aren't printing on
    > archival quality paper with archival quality inks. A tip - prints you get
    > from Walmart aren't archival quality.
    >
    > One thing to consider - the actual archival of the digital file is more
    > valuable than trying to achieve archival quality mounting/framing. You
    > can
    > always reprint the image, cut a new mat from the dimensions of the old
    > one.
    > Whole process probably takes 20 minutes per image every 5 years or so.
    > You
    > probably need to pull the frames to clean out the bugs every 2 or 3 years
    > anyway.
    >
    > Now to answer your original question - you should consider getting UV
    > protective plexi-glass. It's lighter, not very breakable, easier to work
    > with than glass. The only down side is it can be scratched if not handled
    > carefully. But if the plexi was going to be scratched, a glass glaze
    > would
    > probably break - that can scratch or otherwise damage the print. The
    > ultimate purpose for the glaze is to protect the print and IMO plexi does
    > a
    > better job than glass.
    >
    > Michaels has most supplies you'll ever need to get started and their staff
    > is quite helpful.
    >
    > http://www.michaels.com/art/online/home
    >
    > BTW, a book I recommend on framing/matting/archiving:
    >
    > "Picture Perfect Framing" by Katie DuMont
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...102-5412086-9550522?v=glance&s=books&n=507846
    >
    > or
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/7mj9h
    >
    >
    >
    > Good luck and have fun! :)
    >
    > --
    > Mark
    >
    > Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    > http://www.marklauter.com
    >
    >critcher said


    think he means where he can get non reflective glass to hold the photos flat
    while he re-photographs them.
     
    critcher, Aug 26, 2005
    #5
  6. Bucky

    Beach Bum Guest

    > > The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should /not/
    touch
    > > the glass. You should mount the photos with non-acidic mat board and

    back
    > > them with non-acidic foam core or other archival quality mounting board.

    >
    > Are we talking about the same thing? By "archiving" I meant that I was
    > using my digital camera as a scanner to convert previously printed
    > photos into digital files.


    Doh! Not at all. My bad. :)

    --
    Mark

    Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    http://www.marklauter.com
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 26, 2005
    #6
  7. Bucky

    JohnR66 Guest

    "Bucky" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > reflective glass. Where do I get that?
    >
    > And what exactly is it? Is it just regular glass with an antireflective
    > coating? Or is it some kind of special glass? Or is it some of plastic
    > or polycarbonate?
    >

    Are the photos glossy? It might be better to aim two lights in from each
    side and darken the rest of the room to avoid refections. You can then use
    regular glass or plexi. If you still want AR glass, it is called "museum"
    glass at the frame shops. It gives a faint blue-green reflection. Very
    expensive stuff and not all stock it.
    John
     
    JohnR66, Aug 26, 2005
    #7
  8. Bucky

    Frank ess Guest

    critcher wrote:
    > "Beach Bum" <> wrote in message
    > news:flJPe.66277$...
    >>> I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need
    >>> glass to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use
    >>> non
    >>> reflective glass. Where do I get that?

    >>
    >> The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should
    >> /not/
    >> touch
    >> the glass.


    <snap> <er, snip>

    >> critcher said

    >
    > think he means where he can get non reflective glass to hold the
    > photos flat while he re-photographs them.


    I had a couple framed by professionals a few years back. They offered
    plain non-reflective and non-reflective with anti-UV. I got the
    latter. It has worked fine, for both purpose, so far.

    The pros operated in the back of a full-service crafts shop. I'd
    reckon such a store or supplier in your neigborhood would offer or be
    able to contact suppliers of non-reflective glass.

    My effort in archiving old prints before scanner was with a copy stand
    (two lights at 45-deg from the surface of a frame intended to hold
    photo paper under an enlarger. With a large, black posterboard baffle
    with a lens cutout, a single switch for the lights, an angle finder,
    and a lot of persistence and stamina, I was able to do a couple
    hundred in a couple days.

    Post-scanner it was less physically demanding, but no less drudgery
    for a fourth of the time investment.

    --
    Frank ess
    "I can't sing, but I know how to,
    which is quite different."
    -- Noel Coward
     
    Frank ess, Aug 26, 2005
    #8
  9. Bucky

    kz8rt3 Guest

    In article <>,
    "Bucky" <> wrote:

    > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > reflective glass. Where do I get that?
    >
    > And what exactly is it? Is it just regular glass with an antireflective
    > coating? Or is it some kind of special glass? Or is it some of plastic
    > or polycarbonate?


    If the glass touches the photos it is no longer archived. Any moisture
    will be trapped between them and possible make the glass and the image
    stick together. Photos that are not flat should be mounted accordingly.

    Non-reflective glass is a glass with a coating of non-reflective
    material on both sides. It inhibits direct reflection, allowing a very
    clear view of the photograph. In some light, it does cast a blue-green
    reflection, but this is minor. The trade name is Denglas.

    OH, and make it UV safe as well.
     
    kz8rt3, Aug 26, 2005
    #9
  10. Bucky

    Bucky Guest

    Beach Bum wrote:
    > Doh! Not at all. My bad. :)


    Well, apparently "archive" has a meaning that I was not aware of. I
    should have been more specific in the original post. :)
     
    Bucky, Aug 26, 2005
    #10
  11. Bucky

    kz8rt3 Guest

    In article <>,
    "Bucky" <> wrote:

    > Beach Bum wrote:
    > > The glass should /not/ hold the photos flat. The photos should /not/ touch
    > > the glass. You should mount the photos with non-acidic mat board and back
    > > them with non-acidic foam core or other archival quality mounting board.

    >
    > Are we talking about the same thing? By "archiving" I meant that I was
    > using my digital camera as a scanner to convert previously printed
    > photos into digital files.


    Oh, what you were saying is so silly I didn't get it.

    Listen man, don't bother. You are not archiving the photograph, you are
    copying it. Big difference. The images will look crappy if you are
    looking for any type of quality. The photographs will be more valuable,
    so get a firebox and stick them in there. I think that is safer then
    putting them on a computer anyway. I have a photograph of my great
    grandmother in 1907 holding a pig under her arm. Do you think a hard
    drive or a CD will last that long? Hmmmm, no.

    Let us know what equipment you are using and how you are going to light
    it. Ya know, the whole process.
     
    kz8rt3, Aug 26, 2005
    #11
  12. Bucky

    Bucky Guest

    kz8rt3 wrote:
    > Let us know what equipment you are using and how you are going to light
    > it. Ya know, the whole process.


    I was surfing around the web for methods to digitally archive my old
    photos and documents. I tried my scanner, but it is way too slow. I
    don't have the room for a copy stand or any kind of elaborate setup.
    I'm just taking pictures of them on a table that is in a well lit room
    with a window. I need something to flatten the photos/documents. I
    haven't tried glass yet, but I was assuming that I'm going to need the
    non reflective kind since I don't have the ideal lighting environment.

    > I have a photograph of my great
    > grandmother in 1907 holding a pig under her arm. Do you think a hard
    > drive or a CD will last that long?


    My solution for long-term digital archive is to use HD with a backup
    plan. Of course one HD probably won't last over a decade, but when it
    fails, you simply buy a new HD and restore the data.
     
    Bucky, Aug 26, 2005
    #12
  13. Bucky

    Beach Bum Guest

    > > Doh! Not at all. My bad. :)
    >
    > Well, apparently "archive" has a meaning that I was not aware of. I
    > should have been more specific in the original post. :)


    I thought you were going to make archival quality prints and mount/frame
    them according to Library of Congress standards. :)

    --
    Mark

    Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    http://www.marklauter.com
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 26, 2005
    #13
  14. Bucky

    Eric Miller Guest


    > I have a photograph of my great
    > grandmother in 1907 holding a pig under her arm. Do you think a hard
    > drive or a CD will last that long? Hmmmm, no.


    Bad comparison. Who would want to frame a hard drive or CD? The question is
    whether the digital file will last that long. There is no reason to think
    that it won't and it won't fade like your print either. It can be
    transferred to hard drives, CD's, DVD's, printed on paper, exposed onto film
    and stored on whatever other storage medium the future brings. It can also
    be stored in PERFECTLY IDENTICAL form in multiple locations adding an easily
    achieved level of security that your print can never have. Converting prints
    to digital files may result in lower quality than the print from which the
    digital file is made, but the information contained in that print can be
    safeguarded from further degradation by the conversion in a way that is
    probably impossible without the conversion.

    Eric Miller
     
    Eric Miller, Aug 26, 2005
    #14
  15. Bucky

    Beach Bum Guest

    > I was surfing around the web for methods to digitally archive my old
    > photos and documents. I tried my scanner, but it is way too slow. I
    > don't have the room for a copy stand or any kind of elaborate setup.
    > I'm just taking pictures of them on a table that is in a well lit room
    > with a window. I need something to flatten the photos/documents. I
    > haven't tried glass yet, but I was assuming that I'm going to need the
    > non reflective kind since I don't have the ideal lighting environment.


    FWIW, I think storing on DVD or CD is a good idea. But IMO photographing
    the photos isn't the way to go - archival photography uses special lenses to
    avoid distortion. If scanning is too slow, and you're looking at going to
    all this trouble to buy glass to photograph them - why not save yourself the
    time and just go to a pro lab and have them scan and preserve them - that's
    what I'd do.

    No, no.. what I'd do is scratch my head and say "damn, I should have
    archived those irreplaceable prints before the hurricane blew the roof off
    the condo." :)

    --
    Mark

    Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    http://www.marklauter.com
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 26, 2005
    #15
  16. Bucky

    Beach Bum Guest

    > > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > > reflective glass. Where do I get that?

    >
    > If the glass touches the photos it is no longer archived. Any moisture
    > will be trapped between them and possible make the glass and the image
    > stick together. Photos that are not flat should be mounted accordingly.


    Whew.. at least I'm not the only one who read that the way I did. I'm not as
    crazy as I look. :)

    --
    Mark

    Photos, Ideas & Opinions
    http://www.marklauter.com
     
    Beach Bum, Aug 26, 2005
    #16
  17. "Bucky" <> writes:

    > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > reflective glass. Where do I get that?


    I don't think shooting through anti-reflective glass is a really good
    choice for archiving photos. It reduces resolution, and often adds
    some visible graininess.

    Depending on the state of the photos, you should make do with holding
    the edges down with weighted strips or something. If they're *really*
    curly, either straighten them before copying, or else resort to a
    vacuum base to hold them flat (non-trivial expense here).

    Or use a flatbed scanner instead of a copier. It's slower, but does a
    better job usually.
    --
    David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
    RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
    Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
    Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/> Much of which is still down
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, Aug 26, 2005
    #17
  18. Bucky

    Mike Warren Guest

    Beach Bum wrote:
    >>> I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need
    >>> glass to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    >>> reflective glass. Where do I get that?

    >>
    >> If the glass touches the photos it is no longer archived. Any
    >> moisture will be trapped between them and possible make the glass
    >> and the image stick together. Photos that are not flat should be
    >> mounted accordingly.

    >
    > Whew.. at least I'm not the only one who read that the way I did. I'm
    > not as crazy as I look. :)


    Is that even possible? :)

    -Mike
     
    Mike Warren, Aug 27, 2005
    #18
  19. Bucky wrote:
    > I'm trying to archive photographs with my digital camera. I need glass
    > to hold the photos flat, and I read that it is best to use non
    > reflective glass. Where do I get that?
    >
    > And what exactly is it? Is it just regular glass with an
    > antireflective coating? Or is it some kind of special glass? Or is it
    > some of plastic or polycarbonate?


    My personal choice is to use clear glass, not non-reflective, but to
    arrange the lighting so I am not getting reflections.

    Non-reflective glass is not really non-reflective, but it is somewhat
    randomly reflective so you will loose contrast and fine detail when using
    it.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Aug 27, 2005
    #19
  20. Bucky

    kz8rt3 Guest

    In article <>,
    "Bucky" <> wrote:


    > My solution for long-term digital archive is to use HD with a backup
    > plan. Of course one HD probably won't last over a decade, but when it
    > fails, you simply buy a new HD and restore the data.


    If you want to make God laugh all you have to do is tell him what you
    are going to do tomorrow.
     
    kz8rt3, Aug 27, 2005
    #20
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