Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3

Discussion in 'Wireless Networking' started by Bill Wells, Feb 7, 2009.

  1. Bill Wells

    Bill Wells Guest

    Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3?

    I thought Windows XP Professional SP3 came with WPA2-PSK but I can't find
    it.

    If I doubleclick on the Wireless Network Connection applet;
    And then I press "Change advanced settings";
    On "Wireless Network Connections Properties" form "Wireless Networks" tab;
    I press the "Add" button and go to the "Association" tab;
    I give it a "Network name (SSID)" and check to connect even when the
    network isn't broadcasting the SSID.

    The problem is here next ......

    The "Network Authentication" only lists Open, Shared, WPA, & WPA-PSK;
    The "Data encryption" only lists Disabled & WEP.

    But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.
    I thought WPA2-PSK came with service WinXP Pro SP3!

    Do you know the secret for WPA2-PSK on the WinXP SP3 wireless connection?
    I googled, and tried the following from KB
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 but it didn't change anything:
    c:\> netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt
    Bill Wells, Feb 7, 2009
    #1
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  2. Bill Wells

    Kayman Guest

    On Fri, 6 Feb 2009 16:02:59 -0800, Bill Wells wrote:

    > Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3?
    >
    > I thought Windows XP Professional SP3 came with WPA2-PSK but I can't find
    > it.
    >
    > If I doubleclick on the Wireless Network Connection applet;
    > And then I press "Change advanced settings";
    > On "Wireless Network Connections Properties" form "Wireless Networks" tab;
    > I press the "Add" button and go to the "Association" tab;
    > I give it a "Network name (SSID)" and check to connect even when the
    > network isn't broadcasting the SSID.
    >
    > The problem is here next ......
    >
    > The "Network Authentication" only lists Open, Shared, WPA, & WPA-PSK;
    > The "Data encryption" only lists Disabled & WEP.
    >
    > But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.
    > I thought WPA2-PSK came with service WinXP Pro SP3!
    >
    > Do you know the secret for WPA2-PSK on the WinXP SP3 wireless connection?
    > I googled, and tried the following from KB
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 but it didn't change anything:
    > c:\> netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt


    Configuring Windows XP IEEE 802.11 Wireless Networks for the Home and Small
    Business
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb457016.aspx
    Kayman, Feb 7, 2009
    #2
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  3. Bill Wells

    Big_Al Guest

    Bill Wells said this on 2/6/2009 7:02 PM:
    > Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3?
    >
    > I thought Windows XP Professional SP3 came with WPA2-PSK but I can't find
    > it.
    >
    > If I doubleclick on the Wireless Network Connection applet;
    > And then I press "Change advanced settings";
    > On "Wireless Network Connections Properties" form "Wireless Networks" tab;
    > I press the "Add" button and go to the "Association" tab;
    > I give it a "Network name (SSID)" and check to connect even when the
    > network isn't broadcasting the SSID.
    >
    > The problem is here next ......
    >
    > The "Network Authentication" only lists Open, Shared, WPA, & WPA-PSK;
    > The "Data encryption" only lists Disabled & WEP.
    >
    > But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.
    > I thought WPA2-PSK came with service WinXP Pro SP3!
    >
    > Do you know the secret for WPA2-PSK on the WinXP SP3 wireless connection?
    > I googled, and tried the following from KB
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 but it didn't change anything:
    > c:\> netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt


    Your network card in your PC and the associated drivers determine the
    level of security its capable of not Windows, or so I thought.
    Big_Al, Feb 7, 2009
    #3
  4. Bill Wells

    James Egan Guest

    On Fri, 6 Feb 2009 16:02:59 -0800, Bill Wells <>
    wrote:

    >But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.


    Select WPA-PSK and choose AES (instead of TKIP)

    AES(CCMP) was optional in WPA and mandatory in WPA2.



    Jim.
    James Egan, Feb 7, 2009
    #4
  5. Bill Wells

    Lem Guest

    Bill Wells wrote:
    > Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3?
    >
    > I thought Windows XP Professional SP3 came with WPA2-PSK but I can't find
    > it.
    >
    > If I doubleclick on the Wireless Network Connection applet;
    > And then I press "Change advanced settings";
    > On "Wireless Network Connections Properties" form "Wireless Networks" tab;
    > I press the "Add" button and go to the "Association" tab;
    > I give it a "Network name (SSID)" and check to connect even when the
    > network isn't broadcasting the SSID.
    >
    > The problem is here next ......
    >
    > The "Network Authentication" only lists Open, Shared, WPA, & WPA-PSK;
    > The "Data encryption" only lists Disabled & WEP.
    >
    > But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.
    > I thought WPA2-PSK came with service WinXP Pro SP3!
    >
    > Do you know the secret for WPA2-PSK on the WinXP SP3 wireless connection?
    > I googled, and tried the following from KB
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 but it didn't change anything:
    > c:\> netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt


    Big Al has the answer. You only get the encryption capability that your
    hardware supports. Although sometimes you can increase encryption
    capability by getting the most recent driver for your wireless adapter,
    the fact that it only offers WEP now suggests that it's a fairly old
    model. Even with the most recent driver you may only be able to get
    WPA-PSK, although I have a fairly old Linksys WPC54G that works with
    WPA-PSK (AES) which is almost as good as WPA2.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Feb 7, 2009
    #5
  6. Bill Wells

    James Egan Guest

    On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 23:43:06 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:

    >I have a fairly old Linksys WPC54G that works with
    >WPA-PSK (AES) which is almost as good as WPA2.


    If it's "almost" as good then no doubt you'll be able to point out
    where it is different?

    WPA2 made mandatory something that was optional but still available
    with WPA ie. the use of AES(CCMP) instead of TKIP for authentication
    and encryption.


    Jim.
    James Egan, Feb 7, 2009
    #6
  7. Hi
    Many capacities of the OS are not upfront applications but rather info files
    and system files that are ready to work if the Hardware and or an
    Applications need them.
    Windows XP SP3 include the capacity to impellent and use the current gamut
    of Wireless Security. However what would be used (or available) is dependent
    on the Wireless Card and the Wireless source (usually Wireless Router/Access
    Point). The Devices' Drivers are the one that provide the configuration info
    to Windows.
    From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.
    No Security
    Switching Off SSID (same has No Security. SSID can be easily sniffed even if
    it is Off)
    MAC Filtering______(Band Aid if nothing else is available, MAC number can be
    easily Spoofed).
    WEP64____(Easy, to "Break" by knowledgeable people).
    WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    -------------------
    The three above are Not considered safe.
    Safe Starts here at WPA.
    -------------------
    WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Break).
    WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).
    Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.
    Note 2: If you use WinXP bellow SP3 and did not updated it, you would have
    to download the WPA2 patch from Microsoft.
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357
    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.
    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.
    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.
    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.
    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.
    Setting Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html
    The Core differences between WEP, WPA, and WPA2 -
    http://www.ezlan.net/wpa_wep.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).


    "Bill Wells" <> wrote in message
    news:se4jl.16244$...
    > Where do I find WPA2-PSK AES on WinXP SP3?
    >
    > I thought Windows XP Professional SP3 came with WPA2-PSK but I can't find
    > it.
    >
    > If I doubleclick on the Wireless Network Connection applet;
    > And then I press "Change advanced settings";
    > On "Wireless Network Connections Properties" form "Wireless Networks" tab;
    > I press the "Add" button and go to the "Association" tab;
    > I give it a "Network name (SSID)" and check to connect even when the
    > network isn't broadcasting the SSID.
    >
    > The problem is here next ......
    >
    > The "Network Authentication" only lists Open, Shared, WPA, & WPA-PSK;
    > The "Data encryption" only lists Disabled & WEP.
    >
    > But I want WPA2-PSK & AES.
    > I thought WPA2-PSK came with service WinXP Pro SP3!
    >
    > Do you know the secret for WPA2-PSK on the WinXP SP3 wireless connection?
    > I googled, and tried the following from KB
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/299357 but it didn't change anything:
    > c:\> netsh int ip reset c:\resetlog.txt
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 7, 2009
    #7
  8. Bill Wells

    Lem Guest

    James Egan wrote:
    > On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 23:43:06 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a fairly old Linksys WPC54G that works with
    >> WPA-PSK (AES) which is almost as good as WPA2.

    >
    > If it's "almost" as good then no doubt you'll be able to point out
    > where it is different?
    >
    > WPA2 made mandatory something that was optional but still available
    > with WPA ie. the use of AES(CCMP) instead of TKIP for authentication
    > and encryption.
    >
    >
    > Jim.
    >


    http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t378136-wpa-aes-amp-wpa2-aes.html
    http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,12691890?




    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP

    To the moon and back with 2K words of RAM and 36K words of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm
    Lem, Feb 7, 2009
    #8
  9. Bill Wells

    James Egan Guest

    On Sat, 07 Feb 2009 13:25:10 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:

    >James Egan wrote:
    >> On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 23:43:06 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a fairly old Linksys WPC54G that works with
    >>> WPA-PSK (AES) which is almost as good as WPA2.

    >>
    >> If it's "almost" as good then no doubt you'll be able to point out
    >> where it is different?
    >>
    >> WPA2 made mandatory something that was optional but still available
    >> with WPA ie. the use of AES(CCMP) instead of TKIP for authentication
    >> and encryption.
    >>
    >>
    >> Jim.
    >>

    >
    >http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t378136-wpa-aes-amp-wpa2-aes.html
    >http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,12691890?


    Neither of these point out any difference between WPA-PSK(AES) and
    WPA2-PSK.

    They only describe the difference between tkip and aes(ccmp) NOT the
    difference between the wpa and wpa2 implementations of aes(ccmp).

    I haven't been able to find any online source which describes if or
    why one is better than the other.


    Jim.
    James Egan, Feb 8, 2009
    #9
  10. Hi
    WPA uses TKIP/MIC Encryption.
    WPA2 uses AES-CCMP Encryption
    AES aka the Irondale algorithm is a secure, fast symmetric cipher that is
    easily implemented in hardware.
    AES has its own mechanism for dynamic key generation. It's also resistant to
    statistical analysis of the cipher text.
    There is No reason to use some of the terminology in the drivers entries and
    Access Point menus as this appear in many products.
    However there is a tendency of the Entry Level Wireless manufacturer not to
    adhere strictly by implementation and language use to a common standard.
    Each one does something that in their mind would help better Marketing and
    consumers understanding (or misunderstanding) of the products.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "James Egan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Sat, 07 Feb 2009 13:25:10 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >
    >>James Egan wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 06 Feb 2009 23:43:06 -0500, Lem <lemp40@unknownhost> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I have a fairly old Linksys WPC54G that works with
    >>>> WPA-PSK (AES) which is almost as good as WPA2.
    >>>
    >>> If it's "almost" as good then no doubt you'll be able to point out
    >>> where it is different?
    >>>
    >>> WPA2 made mandatory something that was optional but still available
    >>> with WPA ie. the use of AES(CCMP) instead of TKIP for authentication
    >>> and encryption.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Jim.
    >>>

    >>
    >>http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t378136-wpa-aes-amp-wpa2-aes.html
    >>http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,12691890?

    >
    > Neither of these point out any difference between WPA-PSK(AES) and
    > WPA2-PSK.
    >
    > They only describe the difference between tkip and aes(ccmp) NOT the
    > difference between the wpa and wpa2 implementations of aes(ccmp).
    >
    > I haven't been able to find any online source which describes if or
    > why one is better than the other.
    >
    >
    > Jim.
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 8, 2009
    #10
  11. Bill Wells

    James Egan Guest

    On Sun, 8 Feb 2009 13:48:24 -0500, "Jack \(MVP-Networking\)."
    <> wrote:

    >WPA uses TKIP/MIC Encryption.
    >WPA2 uses AES-CCMP Encryption
    >AES aka the Irondale algorithm is a secure, fast symmetric cipher that is
    >easily implemented in hardware.


    Rijndael

    >AES has its own mechanism for dynamic key generation. It's also resistant to
    >statistical analysis of the cipher text.
    >There is No reason to use some of the terminology in the drivers entries and
    >Access Point menus as this appear in many products.
    >However there is a tendency of the Entry Level Wireless manufacturer not to
    >adhere strictly by implementation and language use to a common standard.
    >Each one does something that in their mind would help better Marketing and
    >consumers understanding (or misunderstanding) of the products.


    Are you suggesting WPA-PSK(AES) doesn't exist in reality but only on
    selectable menus?

    The links Lem posted actually accepted that AES/CCMP was used with WPA
    sometimes but wasn't specific about any (security affecting)
    difference between the implementations in wpa and wpa2. From those
    links I got the impression that the security algorithm was equivalent
    in both implementations.

    I do accept the point, though, that even if AES/CCMP is a selected
    option on the menu that TKIP might be used without informing the user
    if the hardware can't handle the AES.


    Jim.
    James Egan, Feb 9, 2009
    #11
  12. Hi
    WPA-PSK(AES) is a sort of WPA2. Since Wireless is the "Wilde West of
    Networking", for variety of reasons some manufacturers at the moment prefer
    this term.
    From the user perspective if there is a choice between with AES and without
    AES, the AES choice is better one, If there is a clear choice of WPA2 then
    it should be used.
    Jack (MS, MVP-Networking)

    "James Egan" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > On Sun, 8 Feb 2009 13:48:24 -0500, "Jack \(MVP-Networking\)."
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>WPA uses TKIP/MIC Encryption.
    >>WPA2 uses AES-CCMP Encryption
    >>AES aka the Irondale algorithm is a secure, fast symmetric cipher that is
    >>easily implemented in hardware.

    >
    > Rijndael
    >
    >>AES has its own mechanism for dynamic key generation. It's also resistant
    >>to
    >>statistical analysis of the cipher text.
    >>There is No reason to use some of the terminology in the drivers entries
    >>and
    >>Access Point menus as this appear in many products.
    >>However there is a tendency of the Entry Level Wireless manufacturer not
    >>to
    >>adhere strictly by implementation and language use to a common standard.
    >>Each one does something that in their mind would help better Marketing and
    >>consumers understanding (or misunderstanding) of the products.

    >
    > Are you suggesting WPA-PSK(AES) doesn't exist in reality but only on
    > selectable menus?
    >
    > The links Lem posted actually accepted that AES/CCMP was used with WPA
    > sometimes but wasn't specific about any (security affecting)
    > difference between the implementations in wpa and wpa2. From those
    > links I got the impression that the security algorithm was equivalent
    > in both implementations.
    >
    > I do accept the point, though, that even if AES/CCMP is a selected
    > option on the menu that TKIP might be used without informing the user
    > if the hardware can't handle the AES.
    >
    >
    > Jim.
    >
    Jack \(MVP-Networking\)., Feb 9, 2009
    #12
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