when will these idiots learn wtf a "G" force is

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by richard, Apr 20, 2010.

  1. richard

    richard Guest

    Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain physics.
    They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin smashing beer
    bottles against it.

    Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how fast
    an object accelerates. So why are they using it to acquire g force
    readings?

    Beats me. But a g force is simple math. 1 g is your body at rest. 2 g's
    means that your body will feel twice as heavy and requires twice the work.
    It is a known fact that astronauts blasting off in the shuttle experience
    something like 6 g's or so. Air force pilots can only handle 7 g's without
    a g suit. At 14 g's most people black out if not laying down.

    One of the bottles hit the dummy's head with a reported 100g force.
    Horsehockey!

    These two idiots should stick to special effects.
     
    richard, Apr 20, 2010
    #1
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  2. richard wrote:

    > Here we go again


    ...with you spewing stuff you know very little about. How about if we see
    how you feel after being whacked on the head? (Oh, maybe someone
    already did that!)

    Give it a rest.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Apr 20, 2010
    #2
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  3. richard

    Mike Yetto Guest

    richard <> writes and having writ moves on.
    > Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain physics.
    > They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin smashing beer
    > bottles against it.
    >
    > Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how fast
    > an object accelerates. So why are they using it to acquire g force
    > readings?
    >


    Possibly because 1 g is acceleration applied by the earth to all
    objects near the surface.

    > Beats me. But a g force is simple math. 1 g is your body at rest. 2 g's
    > means that your body will feel twice as heavy and requires twice the work.
    > It is a known fact that astronauts blasting off in the shuttle experience
    > something like 6 g's or so. Air force pilots can only handle 7 g's without
    > a g suit. At 14 g's most people black out if not laying down.
    >


    I suppose they could have converted the acceleration of the
    dummy's head to something like 16.67 astronaut-blasting-off.

    > One of the bottles hit the dummy's head with a reported 100g force.
    > Horsehockey!
    >


    No, direct measurement.

    > These two idiots should stick to special effects.


    Mike "you should stick to the special bus" Yetto
    --
    In theory, theory and practice are the same.
    In practice they are not.
     
    Mike Yetto, Apr 20, 2010
    #3
  4. richard

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Evan Platt <> writes and having writ moves on.
    > On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 23:55:57 -0400, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>richard wrote:
    >>
    >>> Here we go again

    >>
    >>..with you spewing stuff you know very little about.

    >
    > That's the only thing that can happen. Because it's obvious there's
    > nothing st00pid knows anything about.
    >
    > And seriously, "horsehockey"?
    >
    > Who the fruck says "Horsehockey"??
    >


    Col. Sherman T. Potter, M.A.S.H 4077

    > That's like something a 90 year old grandfather in a comedy show says.


    Mike "yes it is" Yetto
    --
    In theory, theory and practice are the same.
    In practice they are not.
     
    Mike Yetto, Apr 20, 2010
    #4
  5. The Old Sourdough <> via
    news::

    > Meat Plow mumbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >> On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 07:34:19 -0500, The Old Sourdough
    >><>wrote:

    >
    >>> Meat Plow mumbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >>>> On Mon, 19 Apr 2010 20:25:56 -0700, richard
    >>>> <>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>>Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain
    >>>>>physics. They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin
    >>>>>smashing beer bottles against it.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how
    >>>>>fast an object accelerates. So why are they using it to acquire g
    >>>>>force readings?
    >>>
    >>>> So acceleration and G forces have nothing to do with each other?
    >>>
    >>>St00pids comprehension ends when the words become polysyllabic....

    >
    >> I honestly don't know how he gets by living by himself. How does he
    >> know how to do complex things like putting one foot if front of the
    >> other to walk?

    >
    > Brings to mind the old joke about the blond and the Walkman...


    A blonde, a Walkman and a "G" force walk into a bar...

    .... and the blonde says "Are all you guys in the same band?"

    --

    I AM Bucky Breeder, (*(^; ; and *I* approve this message,
    read straight off of Sarah Palin's Cheat-Sheet-Palm notes.

    It's not just a good idea; it's the law:

    http://www.thehighdefinite.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/NXcvK.jpg

    Repent! The end is near.... So, smoke 'em if you got 'em.
     
    Bucky Breeder, Apr 20, 2010
    #5
  6. richard

    richard Guest

    On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 05:59:00 -0500, The Old Sourdough wrote:

    > richard mumbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >> Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain physics.
    >> They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin smashing beer
    >> bottles against it.

    >
    >> Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how fast
    >> an object accelerates.

    >
    > And how fast an object decelerates.
    >
    >> So why are they using it to acquire g force
    >> readings?

    >
    > Because it works equally to measure deceleration.
    >
    >> Beats me. But a g force is simple math.

    >
    > Well, that puts it beyond your understanding.
    >
    >> 1 g is your body at rest. 2 g's
    >> means that your body will feel twice as heavy and requires twice the work.
    >> It is a known fact that astronauts blasting off in the shuttle experience
    >> something like 6 g's or so.

    >
    > Not even close.
    >
    >> Air force pilots can only handle 7 g's without
    >> a g suit. At 14 g's most people black out if not laying down.

    >
    > Aha! I think you've been subjected to too many Gs, and have not
    > yet recovered from your blackout.
    >
    >> One of the bottles hit the dummy's head with a reported 100g force.
    >> Horsehockey!

    >
    > Let me try it on you. Please.
    >
    >> These two idiots should stick to special effects.

    >
    > Oh. Suddenly they're not stuntmen?
    >
    > Here, try reading this:
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force
    >
    > Pay special attention to the paragraph on human tolerance of
    > G-force, and the one on short G-foce durations. I know it uses
    > letters and numbers of more than one digit, so you'll probably
    > need help, but someone can probably explain the hard parts to
    > you, given sufficient repetition. (on second thought, probably
    > not)


    Obviously, you failed to read the content.
    That photo of the dragster was there for a reason. Did you note how many
    g's the driver experiences? 5.3.
    Nowhere near the 50 to 100 g's the tv idiots were reporting.

    As far as I'm concerned, they placed the meter on the wrong object.
    It should have been attached to the moving object. All they got was a
    measurement of how the dummy head reacted.

    Another thing, they might have even used the wrong instrument. What they
    needed to measure with is their little gadget that shows how hard an object
    is being struck.
     
    richard, Apr 20, 2010
    #6
  7. richard

    Jordon Guest

    richard wrote:
    > Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain physics.
    > They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin smashing beer
    > bottles against it.
    >
    > Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how fast
    > an object accelerates. So why are they using it to acquire g force
    > readings?
    >
    > Beats me. But a g force is simple math. 1 g is your body at rest. 2 g's
    > means that your body will feel twice as heavy and requires twice the work.
    > It is a known fact that astronauts blasting off in the shuttle experience
    > something like 6 g's or so. Air force pilots can only handle 7 g's without
    > a g suit. At 14 g's most people black out if not laying down.
    >
    > One of the bottles hit the dummy's head with a reported 100g force.
    > Horsehockey!
    >
    > These two idiots should stick to special effects.


    Sharp as a marble you are.
     
    Jordon, Apr 20, 2010
    #7
  8. richard

    Aardvark Guest

    On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 10:41:16 -0700, richard wrote:

    > Another thing, they might have even used the wrong instrument. What they
    > needed to measure with is their little gadget that shows how hard an
    > object is being struck.


    What? Like an accelerometer?



    --
    Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Aardvark, Apr 20, 2010
    #8
  9. richard wrote:

    > The Old Sourdough wrote:


    >> richard mumbled in 24hoursupport.helpdesk:
    >>> Here we go again ... [g-forces]

    >>
    >> Here, try reading this:
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G-force
    >>
    >> Pay special attention to the paragraph on human tolerance of
    >> G-force, and the one on short G-foce durations. I know it uses
    >> letters and numbers of more than one digit, so you'll probably
    >> need help, but someone can probably explain the hard parts to
    >> you, given sufficient repetition. (on second thought, probably
    >> not)

    >
    > Obviously, you failed to read the content.


    Obviously, you failed to ... oh, what's the use?

    From the above link: "A hard slap on the face may briefly impose
    *hundreds of g* locally but not produce any real damage; a constant 16 g
    for a minute, however, may be deadly."

    > That photo of the dragster was there for a reason. Did you note how
    > many g's the driver experiences? 5.3.
    > Nowhere near the 50 to 100 g's the tv idiots were reporting.


    And also:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(mechanics)

    Dragster acceleration - over time - is one hell of a lot slower than the
    impact of the hammer on your head.

    --
    -bts
    -Four wheels carry the body; two wheels move the soul
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Apr 20, 2010
    #9
  10. richard

    chuckcar Guest

    richard <> wrote in
    news:1cmm46xaze451.1zpmjlp567rw$:

    > Here we go again with the mythbusting dorks trying to explain physics.
    > They hook up an accelerometer to a dummy head. Then begin smashing
    > beer bottles against it.
    >
    > Duhh. What does this device do exactly? It is supposed to measure how
    > fast an object accelerates. So why are they using it to acquire g
    > force readings?
    >
    > Beats me. But a g force is simple math. 1 g is your body at rest. 2
    > g's means that your body will feel twice as heavy and requires twice
    > the work. It is a known fact that astronauts blasting off in the
    > shuttle experience something like 6 g's or so. Air force pilots can
    > only handle 7 g's without a g suit. At 14 g's most people black out if
    > not laying down.
    >
    > One of the bottles hit the dummy's head with a reported 100g force.
    > Horsehockey!
    >
    > These two idiots should stick to special effects.
    >

    And you should stay away from science period. G force is just that: the
    number of times the force *any* force is divided by the force of gravity
    on earth at sea level. That can be pressure of a can opener on the top
    of a can, a punch or the wind rushing between your ears. Anything.


    --
    (setq (chuck nil) car(chuck) )
     
    chuckcar, Apr 20, 2010
    #10
  11. richard

    Aardvark Guest

    On Wed, 21 Apr 2010 08:24:50 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:

    > On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 18:02:58 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark
    > <>wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 10:41:16 -0700, richard wrote:
    >>
    >>> Another thing, they might have even used the wrong instrument. What
    >>> they needed to measure with is their little gadget that shows how hard
    >>> an object is being struck.

    >>
    >>What? Like an accelerometer?

    >
    > I guess he doesn't know those things not only cover acceleration they
    > cover deceleration too.


    He seems to be unable to grasp the simplest of scientific (or even legal)
    principles. Not only that, he also would appear to mis-hear, mis-see and
    misunderstand all kinds of input.





    --
    Top posting because your cursor happens to be there is like shitting in
    your pants because that's where your asshole happens to be.
     
    Aardvark, Apr 21, 2010
    #11
  12. richard

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Meat Plow <Meat> writes and having writ moves on.
    > On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 18:02:58 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark
    ><>wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 10:41:16 -0700, richard wrote:
    >>
    >>> Another thing, they might have even used the wrong instrument. What they
    >>> needed to measure with is their little gadget that shows how hard an
    >>> object is being struck.

    >>
    >>What? Like an accelerometer?

    >
    > I guess he doesn't know those things not only cover acceleration they
    > cover deceleration too.


    Just like nails. You use about half of them on the other wall.

    Mike "depends on where they're pointing" Yetto
    --
    In theory, theory and practice are the same.
    In practice they are not.
     
    Mike Yetto, Apr 21, 2010
    #12
  13. richard

    Mike Yetto Guest

    Aardvark <> writes and having writ moves on.
    > On Wed, 21 Apr 2010 08:24:50 -0400, Meat Plow wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 18:02:58 +0000 (UTC), Aardvark
    >> <>wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 20 Apr 2010 10:41:16 -0700, richard wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Another thing, they might have even used the wrong instrument. What
    >>>> they needed to measure with is their little gadget that shows how hard
    >>>> an object is being struck.
    >>>
    >>>What? Like an accelerometer?

    >>
    >> I guess he doesn't know those things not only cover acceleration they
    >> cover deceleration too.

    >
    > He seems to be unable to grasp the simplest of scientific (or even legal)
    > principles. Not only that, he also would appear to mis-hear, mis-see and
    > misunderstand all kinds of input.
    >


    Someone once explained ROT13 to him, and somehow it stuck.

    Mike "furrfu" Yetto
    --
    In theory, theory and practice are the same.
    In practice they are not.
     
    Mike Yetto, Apr 21, 2010
    #13
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