When that new camera arrives at your doorstep...

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Dave, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up to
    room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it into a
    warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
     
    Dave, Dec 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    problem. I occasionally had to wait for it to warm up enough to get the
    condensation off the lens. It is not just the first time you open the box,
    but every time you bring it in from the cold.

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:VFH5j.13088$o_6.285@trnddc08...
    > If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    > for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up
    > to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it
    > into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
    >



    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia 's Muire duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Dec 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Dave

    Scott W Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    > for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up to
    > room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it into a
    > warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
    >


    We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    temperature as the outside of the house.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Dave

    Jer Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    > for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up to
    > room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it into a
    > warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
    >
    >


    We don't have that problem, we keep the outside of the house the same
    temperature as the inside of the house. :)

    --
    jer
    email reply - I am not a 'ten'
     
    Jer, Dec 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Dave

    Ron Hunter Guest

    Scott W wrote:
    > Dave wrote:
    >> If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the
    >> box for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually
    >> warm up to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately
    >> bring it into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may
    >> damage it!

    >
    > We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    > temperature as the outside of the house.
    >
    > Scott


    Sure hope you don't live in Nome, Alaska, or Laredo, Tx.!!!
     
    Ron Hunter, Dec 6, 2007
    #5
  6. Dave

    Steve Dell Guest

    I normally don't have the problem. I live in Tucson
    "Scott W" <> wrote in message
    news:4757725f$0$2303$...
    > Dave wrote:
    >> If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the
    >> box for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually
    >> warm up to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately
    >> bring it into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage
    >> it!

    >
    > We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    > temperature as the outside of the house.
    >
    > Scott
     
    Steve Dell, Dec 6, 2007
    #6
  7. Dave

    ~~NoMad~~ Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:VFH5j.13088$o_6.285@trnddc08...
    > If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    > for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up
    > to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it
    > into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
    >


    This is an especially big problem with DSLR cameras that have more mass and
    glass that stays cold longer. Be sure not to change lenses or remove lens
    caps for at least four hours after bringing them indoors! Moisture can
    damage the coatings on lenses.

    Moisture can easily get trapped inside a sealed DSLR and corrode the insides
    of the camera. Be sure to regularly warm up the camera and let it sit for a
    while with the lens removed so that the internals can get dried out.

    NM
     
    ~~NoMad~~, Dec 6, 2007
    #7
  8. ~~NoMad~~ wrote:
    []
    > This is an especially big problem with DSLR cameras that have more
    > mass and glass that stays cold longer. Be sure not to change lenses
    > or remove lens caps for at least four hours after bringing them
    > indoors! Moisture can damage the coatings on lenses.


    I don't accept that statement about damage from moisture, but if it were
    true, it would be equally true for both large and small cameras.

    > Moisture can easily get trapped inside a sealed DSLR and corrode the
    > insides of the camera. Be sure to regularly warm up the camera and
    > let it sit for a while with the lens removed so that the internals
    > can get dried out.
    > NM


    I would not normally recommend keeping a DSLR with the lens removed for
    any period.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Dec 6, 2007
    #8
  9. Dave

    Annika1980 Guest

    On Dec 5, 10:54 pm, Scott W <> wrote:
    >
    > We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    > temperature as the outside of the house.
    >
    > Scott


    I knew my favorite lucky bastard from Hawaii would say that!

    Let me guess today's forecast. Low of 74, high of 82.
    Was I close?
     
    Annika1980, Dec 6, 2007
    #9
  10. Dave

    acl Guest

    On Dec 6, 2:35 pm, "David J Taylor" <-this-
    bit.nor-this-bit.co.uk> wrote:
    > ~~NoMad~~ wrote:
    >
    > []
    >
    > > This is an especially big problem with DSLR cameras that have more
    > > mass and glass that stays cold longer. Be sure not to change lenses
    > > or remove lens caps for at least four hours after bringing them
    > > indoors! Moisture can damage the coatings on lenses.

    >
    > I don't accept that statement about damage from moisture, but if it were
    > true, it would be equally true for both large and small cameras.
    >
    > > Moisture can easily get trapped inside a sealed DSLR and corrode the
    > > insides of the camera. Be sure to regularly warm up the camera and
    > > let it sit for a while with the lens removed so that the internals
    > > can get dried out.
    > > NM

    >
    > I would not normally recommend keeping a DSLR with the lens removed for
    > any period.
    >
    > David



    I've been changing lenses outdoors, indoors just after coming in from
    outdoors (ie while there is still condensation on the camera and lens
    that was mounted on it from bringing it inside) etc for around 20
    months now with my d200, with no problems.

    And I do think that leaving an slr sitting there with the lens off to
    dry is a fairly stupid thing to do (sort of like leaving your film slr
    open to dry... "dry"? come on!). However, this suggestion is but a
    drop in the ocean of stupidity that this group has recently been
    turned into.
     
    acl, Dec 6, 2007
    #10
  11. Dave

    Roy G Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:VFH5j.13088$o_6.285@trnddc08...
    > If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the box
    > for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually warm up
    > to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately bring it
    > into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may damage it!
    >


    Hi.

    I have some experience of working in a Camera Repair Shop.

    We used to often see Video Cams which were corroded internally beyond
    repair. The most usual cause was incorrect storage.

    They had been kept, with partially charged batteries, in their cases for
    months on end, in living room cupboards, or bedroom cupboards, and even
    kitchen cupboards .

    Our advice was always to keep Cameras in cool draughty places, but wrapped
    in fine (dust proof) cloth - NOT poly bags or semi airtight cases.

    The comments about removing lenses and opening the Film Door for SLRs is the
    correct way to ensure they dry out, especially if they have been exposed to
    moisture, like rain.

    For DSLRs that has to be modified to ensure dust does not enter, and putting
    it into a clean paper bag will ensure that, and still allow air to
    circulate. The ideal thing is an unused vacuum cleaner bag.

    It is also advisable to bring them out, fire the shutter and flash a few
    times, and check the battery charge every so often.

    The exception would be for a Camera which has been submersed. In that case
    the battery should be removed and the still wet camera should be sealed into
    a poly bag to prevent it drying out, until it can be got to a qualified
    repairer.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Dec 6, 2007
    #11
  12. Dave

    Scott W Guest

    Annika1980 wrote:
    > On Dec 5, 10:54 pm, Scott W <> wrote:
    >> We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    >> temperature as the outside of the house.
    >>
    >> Scott

    >
    > I knew my favorite lucky bastard from Hawaii would say that!
    >
    > Let me guess today's forecast. Low of 74, high of 82.
    > Was I close?
    >


    Something like that, but we have a storm system parked over us right now.


    <http://weather.hawaii.edu/satellite/satanim.cgi?chnl=ui4&domain=nep&banner=uhmet&satplat=goes10>

    Yesterday we had a lot of rain and a lot of high wind, very rough seas.

    <http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2007/Dec/05/br/br3256849017.html>

    We saw them coming in, wait for a while and then leave.

    This would be one bad week to be vacationing in Hawaii.

    But I did get more camera gear from UPS yesterday and I am happy to say
    I did not need to let it warm up slowly. I will post some images from
    the new stuff soon.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Dec 6, 2007
    #12
  13. Dave

    Jim Townsend Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:

    > You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    > kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    > problem.


    Same here.

    In cold climates, the relative humidity inside the house drops when the air is
    heated. Many people have to install humidifiers on their furnaces to keep the humidity
    up to a tolerable level. But with a humidifier, you can't put the humidity up too high
    or the windows will start dripping.

    The link below has the temps where I live right now. It gets down to 40 below zero
    here sometimes. Despite that, I've *never* had a problem with condensation.

    http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/mb-38_metric_e.html
     
    Jim Townsend, Dec 6, 2007
    #13
  14. "Roy G" <> wrote:
    >We used to often see Video Cams which were corroded internally beyond
    >repair. The most usual cause was incorrect storage.


    I think that needs to be emphasized. Storage that
    allows the camera to collect moisture... or repeatedly
    taking the camera from a cooler atmosphere to a warmer
    atmosphere. Both will result in internal corrosion of
    the electronic components. The cable connectors in
    particular, are a problem.

    >They had been kept, with partially charged batteries, in their cases for
    >months on end, in living room cupboards, or bedroom cupboards, and even
    >kitchen cupboards .


    Most of those are nice humid places... which is bad.

    >Our advice was always to keep Cameras in cool draughty places, but wrapped
    >in fine (dust proof) cloth - NOT poly bags or semi airtight cases.


    The key word is "dry". Cool or warm... probably warm
    is better, but the reason "draughty" is better is
    because it keeps it dry by moving the moisture away.

    It can't dry out through an airtight bag or case...

    Otherwise, I agree with your comments.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Dec 6, 2007
    #14
  15. Jim Townsend <> wrote:
    >Joseph Meehan wrote:
    >
    >> You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    >> kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    >> problem.

    >
    >Same here.
    >
    >In cold climates, the relative humidity inside the house drops when the air is
    >heated. Many people have to install humidifiers on their furnaces to keep the humidity
    >up to a tolerable level. But with a humidifier, you can't put the humidity up too high
    >or the windows will start dripping.
    >
    >The link below has the temps where I live right now. It gets down to 40 below zero
    >here sometimes. Despite that, I've *never* had a problem with condensation.


    So the windows drip, but your cameras don't???

    I'm not sure if you are saying that you handle cameras
    correctly and as a result have never had a problem; or
    if you are claiming that no special handling is
    necessary (which is only true if you don't take the
    camera outside when it's cold).

    >http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/mb-38_metric_e.html


    See what happens when we get a warm spell here? The
    cold air from Siberia gets pushed north of us, and goes
    east of us... and *you* get it! :)

    Barrow is reporting -12C right now, and the low in the past
    24 hours was only down to -24C.

    --
    Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson>
    Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska)
     
    Floyd L. Davidson, Dec 6, 2007
    #15
  16. I suspect those who worship the camera rather than seeing it as just a
    tool to get the image, would have a different feel for all this. It has
    been a long time since I worked professionally in photography, but I did
    learn that all a camera is is a way to and end. It is to be used and not
    worshiped. Worrying about the camera can come between you and the image.
    Not that my images are anything to worship themselves, but frankly I don't
    worry all that much about my camera.

    "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Joseph Meehan wrote:
    >
    >> You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    >> kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    >> problem.

    >
    > Same here.
    >
    > In cold climates, the relative humidity inside the house drops when the
    > air is
    > heated. Many people have to install humidifiers on their furnaces to keep
    > the humidity
    > up to a tolerable level. But with a humidifier, you can't put the humidity
    > up too high
    > or the windows will start dripping.
    >
    > The link below has the temps where I live right now. It gets down to 40
    > below zero
    > here sometimes. Despite that, I've *never* had a problem with
    > condensation.
    >
    > http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/mb-38_metric_e.html
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >



    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia 's Muire duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Dec 6, 2007
    #16
  17. Dave

    acl Guest

    On Dec 6, 6:39 pm, "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote:
    > I suspect those who worship the camera rather than seeing it as just a
    > tool to get the image, would have a different feel for all this. It has
    > been a long time since I worked professionally in photography, but I did
    > learn that all a camera is is a way to and end. It is to be used and not
    > worshiped. Worrying about the camera can come between you and the image.
    > Not that my images are anything to worship themselves, but frankly I don't
    > worry all that much about my camera.


    This I agree with, although they tend to be expensive and some care
    should be taken. But, as I've said, I cycle daily 15km to work and
    back, and it is usually cool and raining at night when I cycle back.
    Mostly I normally just sling the camera over my shoulder, except if it
    is heavily raining, when I put it in a rucksack or something similar.
    So of course as soon as I enter my house it's moist all over (surface,
    filter etc). What can I say, nothing has happened to it in 20 months
    (although for part of that I used a bag all the time). Maybe I'm just
    lucky.
     
    acl, Dec 6, 2007
    #17
  18. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Joseph Meehan wrote:
    >
    >> You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    >> kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    >> problem.

    >
    > Same here.
    >
    > In cold climates, the relative humidity inside the house drops when the
    > air is
    > heated. Many people have to install humidifiers on their furnaces to keep
    > the humidity
    > up to a tolerable level. But with a humidifier, you can't put the humidity
    > up too high
    > or the windows will start dripping.
    >
    > The link below has the temps where I live right now. It gets down to 40
    > below zero
    > here sometimes. Despite that, I've *never* had a problem with
    > condensation.
    >
    > http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/mb-38_metric_e.html
    >

    For what it's worth:
    When I got my new Panasonic DMC-FZ50 about a year ago, it was 22 °F outside
    and 66°F and 43% humidity inside.
    The camera was outside at my doorstep. I was excited to see the camera so I
    brought it inside, opened the box and looked it over.
    In about 20 seconds, I saw (to my horror) condensation fogging up all the
    metal parts. Put it right back into the box and taped it shut. Well,
    thankfully it survived with no apparent damage.
     
    Dave, Dec 9, 2007
    #18
  19. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message
    news:475833cf$0$8648$...
    > I suspect those who worship the camera rather than seeing it as just a
    > tool to get the image, would have a different feel for all this. It has
    > been a long time since I worked professionally in photography, but I did
    > learn that all a camera is is a way to and end. It is to be used and not
    > worshiped. Worrying about the camera can come between you and the image.
    > Not that my images are anything to worship themselves, but frankly I don't
    > worry all that much about my camera.
    >
    > "Jim Townsend" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Joseph Meehan wrote:
    >>
    >>> You have a point, but in 45+ years of photography I have brought all
    >>> kinds of cameras in from the cold, including digitals, and never had a
    >>> problem.

    >>
    >> Same here.
    >>
    >> In cold climates, the relative humidity inside the house drops when the
    >> air is
    >> heated. Many people have to install humidifiers on their furnaces to keep
    >> the humidity
    >> up to a tolerable level. But with a humidifier, you can't put the
    >> humidity up too high
    >> or the windows will start dripping.
    >>
    >> The link below has the temps where I live right now. It gets down to 40
    >> below zero
    >> here sometimes. Despite that, I've *never* had a problem with
    >> condensation.
    >>
    >> http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/city/pages/mb-38_metric_e.html
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > --
    > Joseph Meehan
    >
    > Dia 's Muire duit
    >
    >

    Worship? Some like myself barely make the rent every month and eat the
    cheapest reasonably healthy food possible.
    I need to be careful with those very expensive tools!


    For what it's worth:
    When I got my new Panasonic DMC-FZ50 about a year ago, it was 22 °F outside
    and 66°F and 43% humidity inside.
    The camera was outside at my doorstep. I was excited to see the camera so I
    brought it inside, opened the box and looked it over.
    In about 20 seconds, I saw (to my horror) condensation fogging up all the
    metal parts. Put it right back into the box and taped it shut. Well,
    thankfully it survived with no apparent damage.

    >
     
    Dave, Dec 9, 2007
    #19
  20. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Steve Dell" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I normally don't have the problem. I live in Tucson
    > "Scott W" <> wrote in message
    > news:4757725f$0$2303$...
    >> Dave wrote:
    >>> If a camera been out in the cold, you don't want to take it out of the
    >>> box for probably at least an hour, until it has a chance to gradually
    >>> warm up to room temperature. If you take a cold camera and immediately
    >>> bring it into a warm room, you'll get condensation on it which may
    >>> damage it!

    >>
    >> We don't have that problem, we keep the inside of the house the same
    >> temperature as the outside of the house.
    >>
    >> Scott

    >

    For what it's worth:
    When I got my new Panasonic DMC-FZ50 about a year ago, it was 22 °F outside
    and 66°F and 43% humidity inside.
    The camera was outside at my doorstep. I was excited to see the camera so I
    brought it inside, opened the box and looked it over.
    In about 20 seconds, I saw (to my horror) condensation fogging up all the
    metal parts. Put it right back into the box and taped it shut. Well,
    thankfully it survived with no apparent damage.
     
    Dave, Dec 9, 2007
    #20
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