What to do about dead photo lithiums

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jack Blake, Oct 25, 2004.

  1. Jack Blake

    Jack Blake Guest

    Found a place that accepts dead lithiums

    http://www.realgoods.com/board/tdoc.cfm?td=812&tm=2947

    Please forward this information to other people, especially those
    (camera buffs) who use digital cameras, electric scooters (hospitals),
    electric patient lifts (nursing homes) or large number of 9V alkalines
    (sound studios.)
    You (yes, You-Everyday-Joe!) can do something quick 'n easy for this
    polluted planet, our-home, Earth. As you may have read, we humans are
    using up 120 of this Earth's resources. And, are you still dumping
    alkaline and lead-acid batteries? But, car batteries are recycled now
    (aren't they?) Mebbe, mebbe not -- for, according to one investigative
    report, "The Myth of Automobile Battery Recycling", car battery acids
    are simply dumped in Third World streams by people too poor, too
    ignorant, to know not what they're doing. And, there will be future
    generations to pay.

    Can I really do something? Yup. Here's how, grasshopper...

    You (and perhaps your association members) can mail in used photo 3V
    Lithium batteries (such as CR2, or CR123A) to any of the following
    locations, where they will be revived (reconditioned) and put back
    into service. There is no charge to ship them to these locations.
    Small Lithium batteries are very light, 10 of them can be mailed for
    under 2 in a homemade cardboard mailer, using recycled cardboard.
    Non-leaking alkaline batteries (especially 9V) will also be accepted
    here:

    - Choices Market, 1202 Richards Street, Vancouver BC V6B 3G2 - The
    Roundhouse Community Centre: 181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver BC V6Z 2W3
    - Capers Community Market, 1675 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC V6G 1C8

    Please forward this information to other people, especially those
    (camera buffs) who use digital cameras, electric scooters (hospitals),
    electric patient lifts (nursing homes) or large number of 9V alkalines
    (sound studios.)

    Other kinds of batteries? Those 12AH to 34AH "gel" sealed lead acid
    batteries, you can send them in, as well. Some of these will be
    reconditioned and given away to non-profits, such as the Agape Street
    Mission. Here's where to ship your used gel cell batteries:

    - Eternal Abundance, 1025 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC V5L 3X1 - JV
    Bike Sales & Rentals, 1387 Richards St, Yaletown, BC V6B 3G6
     
    Jack Blake, Oct 25, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Jack Blake

    Bob Williams Guest


    > You (and perhaps your association members) can mail in used photo 3V
    > Lithium batteries (such as CR2, or CR123A) to any of the following
    > locations, where they will be revived (reconditioned) and put back
    > into service.
    >
    > - Choices Market, 1202 Richards Street, Vancouver BC V6B 3G2 - The
    > Roundhouse Community Centre: 181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver BC V6Z 2W3
    > - Capers Community Market, 1675 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC V6G 1C8


    I'm not at all sure that they are reconditioned.
    Don't know how you could get into the case to "recondition" it.
    I suspect that they are simply repackaged "as is" and sold on eBay in
    pairs for 8-10 bucks.
    I bought a pair on eBay for my Canon S45.
    They ran the camera for about 10 minutes.
    CAVEAT EMPTOR....Buyer Beware.
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Oct 25, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. It's a nice gesture, but planet pollution is a huge issue. My suggestions:

    1/ Drive less and consume less.
    2/ Consider a Toyata Prius or some such (or at least a vehicle that serves
    your needs that does not overwhealm).
    3/ Turn off lights and appliances when not needed.
    4/ Adjust thermostats to a reasonable level and close doors and windows when
    the system is on.
    5/ Recycle as supported by your community.
    6/ Support companies and groups that consider our planet. For example, in
    the USA you can often choose a renewable energy supplier at a higher cost
    but doing so will make an investment in the future.
    7/ Support research as we need to find new solutions, and they are out
    there!
     
    Charles Schuler, Oct 25, 2004
    #3
  4. "Charles Schuler" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > It's a nice gesture, but planet pollution is a huge issue. My
    > suggestions:
    >
    > 1/ Drive less and consume less.


    HEAR, HEAR! And that involves primarily choosing to live close to where you
    work. I wish Atlanta would lose its fascination with 50-mile commutes! (Or
    build a commuter train system!)

    > 2/ Consider a Toyota Prius or some such (or at least a vehicle that serves
    > your needs that does not overwhealm).
    > 3/ Turn off lights and appliances when not needed.
    > 4/ Adjust thermostats to a reasonable level and close doors and windows
    > when the system is on.
    > 5/ Recycle as supported by your community.
    > 6/ Support companies and groups that consider our planet. For example, in
    > the USA you can often choose a renewable energy supplier at a higher cost
    > but doing so will make an investment in the future.
    > 7/ Support research as we need to find new solutions, and they are out
    > there!


    All good suggestions. By far the biggest thing we can do to conserve
    natural resources is simply to remove inefficiency.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 25, 2004
    #4
  5. In article <417c57c0$>,
    ess (Michael A. Covington) wrote:

    > Or build a commuter train system!


    Actually there were some depressing statistics here in the UK
    recently which showed that it's usually more energy efficient
    to travel to work by car. After all, a lot of technology's
    gone into making modern vehicles more fuel efficient.

    However with the average vehicle in the States being a little
    less fuel efficient (I believe) the numbers may stack up
    differently over there.

    I think trains (as long as they're nearly full of people)
    perform better in long range service, with large gaps between
    stops. But for local commuter services the constant stopping
    & starting of these very heavy vehicles ruins any hope of
    energy efficiency. Of course gridlock does a similar thing to
    car statistics, but there's always the possibility of
    staggering journey times to minimise this.

    Andrew McP... wandering wildly off topic and expending many
    unnecessary hot-airmiles in the process.
     
    Andrew MacPherson, Oct 25, 2004
    #5
  6. (Jack Blake) writes:

    >You (and perhaps your association members) can mail in used photo 3V
    >Lithium batteries (such as CR2, or CR123A) to any of the following
    >locations, where they will be revived (reconditioned) and put back
    >into service.


    How? According to everything I've read about batteries, those lithium
    primary cells are *not* rechargeable. Lithiums, in particular, are a
    fire/explosion hazard if you try to recharge them, since you can get
    metallic lithium forming inside the cell.

    Note that these are *not* the same chemistry as the lithium ion
    rechargeable batteries used in cellphones, laptop computers, and digital
    cameras.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Oct 25, 2004
    #6
  7. "Andrew MacPherson" <> wrote in message
    news:memo.20041025040351.676B@address_disguised.address_disguised...
    > In article <417c57c0$>,
    > ess (Michael A. Covington) wrote:
    >
    >> Or build a commuter train system!

    >
    > Actually there were some depressing statistics here in the UK
    > recently which showed that it's usually more energy efficient
    > to travel to work by car. After all, a lot of technology's
    > gone into making modern vehicles more fuel efficient.


    Sad. But trains at least have a safety advantage (I think). And they are
    much less wear and tear on the commuter than cars are.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 25, 2004
    #7
  8. I have a PIII laptop that the manufacturer no longer supports....and that
    means they will not help me find a battery for it. Do you know of a place
    that will rebuild it and send it back to me?


    "Jack Blake" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Found a place that accepts dead lithiums
    >
    > http://www.realgoods.com/board/tdoc.cfm?td=812&tm=2947
    >
    > Please forward this information to other people, especially those
    > (camera buffs) who use digital cameras, electric scooters (hospitals),
    > electric patient lifts (nursing homes) or large number of 9V alkalines
    > (sound studios.)
    > You (yes, You-Everyday-Joe!) can do something quick 'n easy for this
    > polluted planet, our-home, Earth. As you may have read, we humans are
    > using up 120 of this Earth's resources. And, are you still dumping
    > alkaline and lead-acid batteries? But, car batteries are recycled now
    > (aren't they?) Mebbe, mebbe not -- for, according to one investigative
    > report, "The Myth of Automobile Battery Recycling", car battery acids
    > are simply dumped in Third World streams by people too poor, too
    > ignorant, to know not what they're doing. And, there will be future
    > generations to pay.
    >
    > Can I really do something? Yup. Here's how, grasshopper...
    >
    > You (and perhaps your association members) can mail in used photo 3V
    > Lithium batteries (such as CR2, or CR123A) to any of the following
    > locations, where they will be revived (reconditioned) and put back
    > into service. There is no charge to ship them to these locations.
    > Small Lithium batteries are very light, 10 of them can be mailed for
    > under 2 in a homemade cardboard mailer, using recycled cardboard.
    > Non-leaking alkaline batteries (especially 9V) will also be accepted
    > here:
    >
    > - Choices Market, 1202 Richards Street, Vancouver BC V6B 3G2 - The
    > Roundhouse Community Centre: 181 Roundhouse Mews, Vancouver BC V6Z 2W3
    > - Capers Community Market, 1675 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC V6G 1C8
    >
    > Please forward this information to other people, especially those
    > (camera buffs) who use digital cameras, electric scooters (hospitals),
    > electric patient lifts (nursing homes) or large number of 9V alkalines
    > (sound studios.)
    >
    > Other kinds of batteries? Those 12AH to 34AH "gel" sealed lead acid
    > batteries, you can send them in, as well. Some of these will be
    > reconditioned and given away to non-profits, such as the Agape Street
    > Mission. Here's where to ship your used gel cell batteries:
    >
    > - Eternal Abundance, 1025 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC V5L 3X1 - JV
    > Bike Sales & Rentals, 1387 Richards St, Yaletown, BC V6B 3G6
     
    Gene Palmiter, Oct 25, 2004
    #8
  9. "Gene Palmiter" <> wrote in
    news:Wl0fd.1778$eU2.800@trndny05:

    > I have a PIII laptop that the manufacturer no longer supports....and that
    > means they will not help me find a battery for it. Do you know of a place
    > that will rebuild it and send it back to me?
    >

    I know of a couple here in OZ ;-) One in Adelaide, another in Canberra.
    Look in the Yellow Pages (old technology) for battery packs. You could try
    a power tool repair shop, they may have a link to battery pack
    refurbishers. (OT. good word that - we don't talk about furbishing
    anything do we?)
    Phil
    >
    > "Jack Blake" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Found a place that accepts dead lithiums
    >>
    >> http://www.realgoods.com/board/tdoc.cfm?td=812&tm=2947
    >>
    >> Please forward this information to other people, especially those
    >> (camera buffs) who use digital cameras, electric scooters (hospitals),
    >> electric patient lifts (nursing homes) or large number of 9V alkalines
    >> (sound studios.)

    <snip>
     
    Phil Kempster, Oct 25, 2004
    #9
  10. Jack Blake

    BG250 Guest

    "Charles Schuler" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > It's a nice gesture, but planet pollution is a huge issue. My

    suggestions:
    >
    > 1/ Drive less and consume less.

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 2/ Consider a Toyata Prius or some such (or at least a vehicle that serves
    > your needs that does not overwhealm).

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 3/ Turn off lights and appliances when not needed.

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 4/ Adjust thermostats to a reasonable level and close doors and windows

    when
    > the system is on.

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 5/ Recycle as supported by your community.

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 6/ Support companies and groups that consider our planet. For example, in
    > the USA you can often choose a renewable energy supplier at a higher cost
    > but doing so will make an investment in the future.

    I'm an American, I can't do that.
    > 7/ Support research as we need to find new solutions, and they are out
    > there!

    I'm an American, I can't do that because all my money is gone. See above.
    >
     
    BG250, Oct 25, 2004
    #10
  11. "Gene Palmiter" <> wrote in message
    news:Wl0fd.1778$eU2.800@trndny05...
    >I have a PIII laptop that the manufacturer no longer supports....and that
    > means they will not help me find a battery for it. Do you know of a place
    > that will rebuild it and send it back to me?


    www.batteriesplus.com
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 25, 2004
    #11
  12. Jack Blake

    Big Bill Guest

    On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 05:41:10 GMT, "Gene Palmiter"
    <> wrote:

    >I have a PIII laptop that the manufacturer no longer supports....and that
    >means they will not help me find a battery for it. Do you know of a place
    >that will rebuild it and send it back to me?


    I have a PII laptop that obviously isn't supported, and I just got a
    new battery for it. More capacity, and less $ than the OEM was.
    Have you tried a Google search on laptop batteries?

    Bill Funk
    Change "g" to "a"
     
    Big Bill, Oct 25, 2004
    #12
  13. Jack Blake

    Warren Weber Guest

    "Big Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 25 Oct 2004 05:41:10 GMT, "Gene Palmiter"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I have a PIII laptop that the manufacturer no longer supports....and that
    > >means they will not help me find a battery for it. Do you know of a place
    > >that will rebuild it and send it back to me?

    >
    > I have a PII laptop that obviously isn't supported, and I just got a
    > new battery for it. More capacity, and less $ than the OEM was.
    > Have you tried a Google search on laptop batteries?
    >
    > Bill Funk
    > Change "g" to "a"


    Try http://www.abatterypack.com Warren
     
    Warren Weber, Oct 26, 2004
    #13
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