What should a Raid 10 look like?

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. This is a new problem connected with a previous thread.
    I have successfully installed WXP64 on a hard drive which is NOT part of a
    raid array. I have added 4 other new drives, each of 250GB, which I have
    configured in BIOS as a Raid 10 array. I had to load various drivers from my
    mobo disk to do this.

    When I looked at this in Windows, of course I could not see the Raid 10
    array in My Computer, so I went to Computer Management, and it was listed
    there. I used the Create Volume option, and created a volume "F" which I then
    Formatted. It is 460Gb.
    Now I can see this volume in My computer.
    But - where is the Mirror ? My understanding of Raid 10 is that it should be
    using 2 of my 250Gb drives to write data to simultaneously in strips, and the
    other 2 as a 'mirror' or copy. Should that not appear as two drives in My
    computer? Otherwise, how could I access the mirror image if one of the 2 data
    drives failed?

    Did I do the wrong thing when I formatted the Raid 10 volume? Or should I
    have formatted the 4 hard drives before setting them as a Raid 10 array in
    BIOS?
    Mike
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=, Jan 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=

    Aaron Kelley Guest

    Nope, it will appear as one drive.

    In a mirrored system, both drives are written to simultaneously, and can be
    read simultaneously to increase read performance. The RAID controller
    handles this all automatically and transparently. If one of your drives
    fails, the RAID controller is in charge of keeping your array online, and
    when you replace the drive you'll probably have to tell it to put the new
    drive in the array (and it will restore the data to the new drive from the
    mirror, so that your data is all mirrored again).

    - Aaron

    "MikeB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This is a new problem connected with a previous thread.
    > I have successfully installed WXP64 on a hard drive which is NOT part of a
    > raid array. I have added 4 other new drives, each of 250GB, which I have
    > configured in BIOS as a Raid 10 array. I had to load various drivers from
    > my
    > mobo disk to do this.
    >
    > When I looked at this in Windows, of course I could not see the Raid 10
    > array in My Computer, so I went to Computer Management, and it was listed
    > there. I used the Create Volume option, and created a volume "F" which I
    > then
    > Formatted. It is 460Gb.
    > Now I can see this volume in My computer.
    > But - where is the Mirror ? My understanding of Raid 10 is that it should
    > be
    > using 2 of my 250Gb drives to write data to simultaneously in strips, and
    > the
    > other 2 as a 'mirror' or copy. Should that not appear as two drives in My
    > computer? Otherwise, how could I access the mirror image if one of the 2
    > data
    > drives failed?
    >
    > Did I do the wrong thing when I formatted the Raid 10 volume? Or should I
    > have formatted the 4 hard drives before setting them as a Raid 10 array in
    > BIOS?
    > Mike
     
    Aaron Kelley, Jan 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=

    NuTCrAcKeR Guest

    If you set it up right, you will see 1 500GB volume under disk manager.

    Remember, 250GB disk is 250,000,000,000 bytes. Not 250,000 Megabytes, where
    1MB = 1,024,000 bytes, so the reported size will actually be somewhat
    smaller. Also, when you format NTFS, part of the partition is reserved for
    the MFT, which could be quite large depending on what you chose for you
    cluster size.

    "MikeB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This is a new problem connected with a previous thread.
    > I have successfully installed WXP64 on a hard drive which is NOT part of a
    > raid array. I have added 4 other new drives, each of 250GB, which I have
    > configured in BIOS as a Raid 10 array. I had to load various drivers from
    > my
    > mobo disk to do this.
    >
    > When I looked at this in Windows, of course I could not see the Raid 10
    > array in My Computer, so I went to Computer Management, and it was listed
    > there. I used the Create Volume option, and created a volume "F" which I
    > then
    > Formatted. It is 460Gb.
    > Now I can see this volume in My computer.
    > But - where is the Mirror ? My understanding of Raid 10 is that it should
    > be
    > using 2 of my 250Gb drives to write data to simultaneously in strips, and
    > the
    > other 2 as a 'mirror' or copy. Should that not appear as two drives in My
    > computer? Otherwise, how could I access the mirror image if one of the 2
    > data
    > drives failed?
    >
    > Did I do the wrong thing when I formatted the Raid 10 volume? Or should I
    > have formatted the 4 hard drives before setting them as a Raid 10 array in
    > BIOS?
    > Mike
     
    NuTCrAcKeR, Jan 28, 2007
    #3
  4. In addition, what the system is showing you, is the combined user space -
    the mirror is of no interrest to you, since you cannot work with it, and
    your own efforts are not required in any way! The RAID mystery, is handled
    behind the scenes - you just have to trust it! I don't even think you can
    misconfigure a RAID set and successfully complete an installation. That
    should be some sort of comfort!


    Tony. . .


    "MikeB" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > This is a new problem connected with a previous thread.
    > I have successfully installed WXP64 on a hard drive which is NOT part of a
    > raid array. I have added 4 other new drives, each of 250GB, which I have
    > configured in BIOS as a Raid 10 array. I had to load various drivers from

    my
    > mobo disk to do this.
    >
    > When I looked at this in Windows, of course I could not see the Raid 10
    > array in My Computer, so I went to Computer Management, and it was listed
    > there. I used the Create Volume option, and created a volume "F" which I

    then
    > Formatted. It is 460Gb.
    > Now I can see this volume in My computer.
    > But - where is the Mirror ? My understanding of Raid 10 is that it should

    be
    > using 2 of my 250Gb drives to write data to simultaneously in strips, and

    the
    > other 2 as a 'mirror' or copy. Should that not appear as two drives in My
    > computer? Otherwise, how could I access the mirror image if one of the 2

    data
    > drives failed?
    >
    > Did I do the wrong thing when I formatted the Raid 10 volume? Or should I
    > have formatted the 4 hard drives before setting them as a Raid 10 array in
    > BIOS?
    > Mike
     
    Tony Sperling, Jan 29, 2007
    #4
  5. Aha - well thanks to all the people who have reassured me. I see exactly what
    you mean - and it is indeed a "mystery" ! I will leave it as it is then.
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=, Jan 29, 2007
    #5
  6. On Jan 29, 6:34 pm, MikeB <> wrote:
    > Aha - well thanks to all the people who have reassured me. I see exactly what
    > you mean - and it is indeed a "mystery" ! I will leave it as it is then.


    Just do not get too complacent with the safety of a RAID. I have two
    PCs, similar to each other but subtly different. Both have RAID1s.
    One has been bulletproof and the other has had a hit about every 6
    months. The first time the motherboard controller thought one of the
    mirrored drives crashed - it did not. I could happily boot and run
    from either. I had to rebuild the mirror anyway since they were now
    out of perfect synch.

    Second time during boot it complained that it could not find specific
    windows files. I thought the controller died but it did not. Out of
    synch. Rebuilt again.... Gigabyte (K8 series mobos) has been no
    help, as was the builder shop, since it is not broken with symptoms.
    This is not supposed to happen, but...

    In the big systems world where I spend my working day, we have over
    100 TB of FC RAID5 arrays from 4 different major vendors, and each
    vendor has had at least one "inexplicable undocumented unexpected"
    failure taking a unit off line over the last 4 years, most needing
    design engineering support to get it back up. These are $200,000+++
    boxes, not $100~200 motherboard controllers. One of our staff at a
    remote location was running a RAID5 off his PC controller - one drive
    did fail and the rebuild failed - all gone.

    Moral - never underestimate the importance of a backup, RAID or not.

    Your experience might vary, but be prepared anyway.
     
    Computerflyer, Jan 29, 2007
    #6
  7. Thanks for the warning about the safety of RAID. I recently bought two
    Buffalo NAS 500GB units for my system just in case !
    Mike

    "Computerflyer" wrote:

    > On Jan 29, 6:34 pm, MikeB <> wrote:
    > > Aha - well thanks to all the people who have reassured me. I see exactly what
    > > you mean - and it is indeed a "mystery" ! I will leave it as it is then.

    >
    > Just do not get too complacent with the safety of a RAID. I have two
    > PCs, similar to each other but subtly different. Both have RAID1s.
    > One has been bulletproof and the other has had a hit about every 6
    > months. The first time the motherboard controller thought one of the
    > mirrored drives crashed - it did not. I could happily boot and run
    > from either. I had to rebuild the mirror anyway since they were now
    > out of perfect synch.
    >
    > Second time during boot it complained that it could not find specific
    > windows files. I thought the controller died but it did not. Out of
    > synch. Rebuilt again.... Gigabyte (K8 series mobos) has been no
    > help, as was the builder shop, since it is not broken with symptoms.
    > This is not supposed to happen, but...
    >
    > In the big systems world where I spend my working day, we have over
    > 100 TB of FC RAID5 arrays from 4 different major vendors, and each
    > vendor has had at least one "inexplicable undocumented unexpected"
    > failure taking a unit off line over the last 4 years, most needing
    > design engineering support to get it back up. These are $200,000+++
    > boxes, not $100~200 motherboard controllers. One of our staff at a
    > remote location was running a RAID5 off his PC controller - one drive
    > did fail and the rebuild failed - all gone.
    >
    > Moral - never underestimate the importance of a backup, RAID or not.
    >
    > Your experience might vary, but be prepared anyway.
    >
    >
     
    =?Utf-8?B?TWlrZUI=?=, Jan 30, 2007
    #7
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