What is Wrong with Vodafone..?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Mathew Good, Dec 31, 2006.

  1. Mathew Good

    Mathew Good Guest

    Yes totally overloaded network.


    Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
     
    Mathew Good, Dec 31, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mathew Good

    aum Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:

    > Yes totally overloaded network.
    > Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..


    Try skype, or landline
     
    aum, Dec 31, 2006
    #2
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  3. In message <>, aum wrote:

    > On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >
    >> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..

    >
    > Try skype, or landline


    I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open standards.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Dec 31, 2006
    #3
  4. Mathew Good

    bharmer Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In message <>, aum wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..

    >>
    >> Try skype, or landline

    >
    >I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open standards.


    I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    free phone calls.
     
    bharmer, Jan 1, 2007
    #4
  5. Mathew Good

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> exclaimed:

    >In message <>, aum wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..

    >>
    >> Try skype, or landline

    >
    >I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open standards.


    Oh, Yawn.
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 1, 2007
    #5
  6. Mathew Good

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> exclaimed:

    >In message <>, aum wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>
    >>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..

    >>
    >> Try skype, or landline

    >
    >I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open standards.


    Yet you are happy to make calls over Vodafone's network? Not exactly
    an "open standard".

    You post is the absolute stupidest one I've read all year!!




    ;-)
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 1, 2007
    #6
  7. Mathew Good

    Dave Guest

    they don't have any warranties on their phones - We have just lost $600.00
    on a sharp phone that has died.




    "Mathew Good" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > Yes totally overloaded network.
    >
    >
    > Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >
    >
     
    Dave, Jan 1, 2007
    #7
  8. Mathew Good

    El Chippy Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 13:57:52 +1300, Dave wrote:

    > they don't have any warranties on their phones - We have just lost $600.00
    > on a sharp phone that has died.
    >


    If it was purchased and used for personal use its covered by the consumer
    guarantees act. Take it up with sharp and the retailer. Get the consumer
    institute involved too. And fair go if you need to.
     
    El Chippy, Jan 1, 2007
    #8
  9. In message <>, bharmer wrote:

    > On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    > <_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >>In message <>, aum wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >>>
    >>> Try skype, or landline

    >>
    >>I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open
    >>standards.

    >
    > I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    > free phone calls.


    Skype doesn't scale. It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    everybody's phone is connected. What kind of security protocols do they
    use? You don't know. Are they bound by the same sorts of privacy rules,
    confidentiality of calls etc that normal telcos have to adhere to? No,
    because they're not officially a telco. What services would you like to
    implement? If they don't support it, you can't do it.

    There is an official open standard for Internet-based telephony: it's called
    SIP. There is lots of software, including open-source stuff, that speaks
    SIP. You can even buy actual phone handsets that work with it.

    I have one client running an installation of Asterisk, the open-source
    telephony server on a Linux box. It's been quite a learning experience
    coming to grips with what that can do. With an E1 card, it can plug
    straight into the regular telco network--as far as anyone outside is
    concerned, it looks just like another PBX. But you've also got Internet
    connectivity as well, so one of your staff members overseas can still
    connect in, and send and receive calls just by dialling internal
    extensions.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 1, 2007
    #9
  10. Mathew Good

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:32:19 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> exclaimed:

    >In message <>, bharmer wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    >> <_zealand> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In message <>, aum wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>>>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >>>>
    >>>> Try skype, or landline
    >>>
    >>>I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open
    >>>standards.

    >>
    >> I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    >> free phone calls.

    >
    >Skype doesn't scale.


    There's over 50,000,000 users that would disagree with you there.

    > It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    >everybody's phone is connected. What kind of security protocols do they
    >use? You don't know. Are they bound by the same sorts of privacy rules,
    >confidentiality of calls etc that normal telcos have to adhere to? No,
    >because they're not officially a telco. What services would you like to
    >implement? If they don't support it, you can't do it.


    FUD, FUD, FUD.

    >There is an official open standard for Internet-based telephony: it's called
    >SIP. There is lots of software, including open-source stuff, that speaks
    >SIP. You can even buy actual phone handsets that work with it.


    Difference courses for different horses. SIP has it's strengths,
    weaknesses and uses, as does Skype.

    >I have one client running an installation of Asterisk, the open-source
    >telephony server on a Linux box. It's been quite a learning experience
    >coming to grips with what that can do. With an E1 card, it can plug
    >straight into the regular telco network--as far as anyone outside is
    >concerned, it looks just like another PBX. But you've also got Internet
    >connectivity as well, so one of your staff members overseas can still
    >connect in, and send and receive calls just by dialling internal
    >extensions.


    As does our PBX. Point being?

    Of course, the call quality is nothing like that of Skype, unless
    there is fast internet at either end, and in the middle.
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 1, 2007
    #10
  11. Mathew Good

    bharmer Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:32:19 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> wrote:

    >In message <>, bharmer wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    >> <_zealand> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In message <>, aum wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>>>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >>>>
    >>>> Try skype, or landline
    >>>
    >>>I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open
    >>>standards.

    >>
    >> I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    >> free phone calls.

    >
    >Skype doesn't scale. It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    >everybody's phone is connected. What kind of security protocols do they
    >use? You don't know. Are they bound by the same sorts of privacy rules,
    >confidentiality of calls etc that normal telcos have to adhere to? No,
    >because they're not officially a telco. What services would you like to
    >implement? If they don't support it, you can't do it.


    Who gives a shit? I want to talk to my family members. I can, and at
    no cost. I have never heard anyone else's conversations while doing
    this. I doubt that anyone is bothering to listen to mine.

    Nothing sadder than someone guarding a jewel that no one wants to
    steal.
    >
    >There is an official open standard for Internet-based telephony: it's called
    >SIP. There is lots of software, including open-source stuff, that speaks
    >SIP. You can even buy actual phone handsets that work with it.


    Buy? Why would I do that?

    >I have one client running an installation of Asterisk, the open-source
    >telephony server on a Linux box. It's been quite a learning experience
    >coming to grips with what that can do. With an E1 card, it can plug
    >straight into the regular telco network--as far as anyone outside is
    >concerned, it looks just like another PBX. But you've also got Internet
    >connectivity as well, so one of your staff members overseas can still
    >connect in, and send and receive calls just by dialling internal
    >extensions.


    Staff? My family don't have staff.
     
    bharmer, Jan 1, 2007
    #11
  12. Mathew Good

    Dave Guest

    they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    Parallel inported it.

    Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..

    Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    current model.



    "El Chippy" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 13:57:52 +1300, Dave wrote:
    >
    >> they don't have any warranties on their phones - We have just lost
    >> $600.00
    >> on a sharp phone that has died.
    >>

    >
    > If it was purchased and used for personal use its covered by the consumer
    > guarantees act. Take it up with sharp and the retailer. Get the consumer
    > institute involved too. And fair go if you need to.
    >
    >
    >
     
    Dave, Jan 1, 2007
    #12
  13. Mathew Good

    Rob Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:en9qf5$svg$...
    > they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    > Parallel inported it.
    >
    > Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..
    >
    > Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    > current model.
    >
    >
    >


    That's interesting, because under the law, Vodafone have to disclose at
    purchase, that the product has been parallel imported. If they didn't then
    you would have a case against them for breaching the fair trading act. You
    may want to double check the law on that.
    If they parallel imported it would be Vodafone's sole responsibility to sort
    it out.
     
    Rob, Jan 1, 2007
    #13
  14. Mathew Good

    Fred Dagg Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:32:19 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    <_zealand> exclaimed:

    >Skype doesn't scale. It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    >everybody's phone is connected.


    Oh, and to correct your gross misunderstanding of the technology (no
    surprise there), it is NOT like a giant exchange. Calls are made
    computer to computer, not computer to Skype Server to computer.

    Their servers do facilitate this, but www.whitepages.co.nz facilitates
    phone calls - are you saying that that is a flaw of the phone system?
    (And yes I know about how the connections are established etc, more
    than you it seems, so don't try to pull that one).
     
    Fred Dagg, Jan 1, 2007
    #14
  15. Mathew Good

    El Chippy Guest

    On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 15:12:24 +1300, Dave wrote:

    > they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    > Parallel inported it.
    >
    > Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..
    >
    > Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    > current model.
    >


    If you purchased it from vodafone in NZ they are bound by the CGA.
    They sold it, they remedy the problem.

    Sharp might be able to weasel out of it if it was parallel imported, not
    sure about that.

    Jump up and down and scream a bit at vodafone, then give the consumers
    institute a go.

    Vodafone are not keen on losing customers at the moment, they offered me
    $200 credit on my account not to cancel it on them. (i still did, they
    have better plans for prepay customers than account customers).
     
    El Chippy, Jan 1, 2007
    #15
  16. Mathew Good

    bharmer Guest

    On Mon, 1 Jan 2007 15:12:24 +1300, "Dave" <> wrote:

    >they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    >Parallel inported it.
    >
    >Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..
    >
    > Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    >current model.



    Any consumer good soldd by a retailer is subject to the Consumer
    Guarantees Act as far as I know. If they are playing silly buggers
    (regardless of whether the model is "current" or not, I would be
    talking to the Commerce Commission and perhaps to the small claims
    tribunal.

    >"El Chippy" <> wrote in message
    >news:p...
    >> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 13:57:52 +1300, Dave wrote:
    >>
    >>> they don't have any warranties on their phones - We have just lost
    >>> $600.00
    >>> on a sharp phone that has died.
    >>>

    >>
    >> If it was purchased and used for personal use its covered by the consumer
    >> guarantees act. Take it up with sharp and the retailer. Get the consumer
    >> institute involved too. And fair go if you need to.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
     
    bharmer, Jan 1, 2007
    #16
  17. Mathew Good

    Rob Guest

    "Rob" <> wrote in message news:1167618380.33513@ftpsrv1...
    >
    > "Dave" <> wrote in message
    > news:en9qf5$svg$...
    >> they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    >> Parallel inported it.
    >>
    >> Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..
    >>
    >> Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    >> current model.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > That's interesting, because under the law, Vodafone have to disclose at
    > purchase, that the product has been parallel imported. If they didn't then
    > you would have a case against them for breaching the fair trading act. You
    > may want to double check the law on that.
    > If they parallel imported it would be Vodafone's sole responsibility to
    > sort it out.
    >
    >
    >


    Also how old was the phone? It is irrelevant excuse by vodafone, if they say
    that it was an old model, because they are always releasing new models, and
    often when you buy a phone in NZ, the newer model is already out overseas.
     
    Rob, Jan 1, 2007
    #17
  18. In message <>, bharmer wrote:

    > On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:32:19 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    > <_zealand> wrote:
    >
    >>In message <>, bharmer wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    >>> <_zealand> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In message <>, aum wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>>>>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Try skype, or landline
    >>>>
    >>>>I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open
    >>>>standards.
    >>>
    >>> I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    >>> free phone calls.

    >>
    >>Skype doesn't scale. It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    >>everybody's phone is connected. What kind of security protocols do they
    >>use? You don't know. Are they bound by the same sorts of privacy rules,
    >>confidentiality of calls etc that normal telcos have to adhere to? No,
    >>because they're not officially a telco. What services would you like to
    >>implement? If they don't support it, you can't do it.

    >
    > Who gives a shit?


    You may not now, but you will later. It looks like the easy option now, but
    giving a single company so much power over you will inevitably end in
    disappointment. Have you learned nothing from what has happened with
    Microsoft?

    Don't be like the First Frog
    <http://groups.google.co.nz/groups?selm=>.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Jan 1, 2007
    #18
  19. Mathew Good

    Rob Guest

    "Fred Dagg" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 14:32:19 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    > <_zealand> exclaimed:
    >
    >>In message <>, bharmer wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 12:42:39 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro
    >>> <_zealand> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>In message <>, aum wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> On Mon, 01 Jan 2007 11:04:01 +1300, Mathew Good wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Yes totally overloaded network.
    >>>>>> Been trying to ring the UK in the last 22 hours..
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Try skype, or landline
    >>>>
    >>>>I don't like the idea of Skype. I prefer something built on open
    >>>>standards.
    >>>
    >>> I don't care if it is achieved by plaited licorice straps. It gives me
    >>> free phone calls.

    >>
    >>Skype doesn't scale.

    >
    > There's over 50,000,000 users that would disagree with you there.
    >
    >> It is effectively one single, giant exchange to which
    >>everybody's phone is connected. What kind of security protocols do they
    >>use? You don't know. Are they bound by the same sorts of privacy rules,
    >>confidentiality of calls etc that normal telcos have to adhere to? No,
    >>because they're not officially a telco. What services would you like to
    >>implement? If they don't support it, you can't do it.

    >
    > FUD, FUD, FUD.
    >
    >>There is an official open standard for Internet-based telephony: it's
    >>called
    >>SIP. There is lots of software, including open-source stuff, that speaks
    >>SIP. You can even buy actual phone handsets that work with it.

    >
    > Difference courses for different horses. SIP has it's strengths,
    > weaknesses and uses, as does Skype.
    >
    >>I have one client running an installation of Asterisk, the open-source
    >>telephony server on a Linux box. It's been quite a learning experience
    >>coming to grips with what that can do. With an E1 card, it can plug
    >>straight into the regular telco network--as far as anyone outside is
    >>concerned, it looks just like another PBX. But you've also got Internet
    >>connectivity as well, so one of your staff members overseas can still
    >>connect in, and send and receive calls just by dialling internal
    >>extensions.

    >
    > As does our PBX. Point being?
    >
    > Of course, the call quality is nothing like that of Skype, unless
    > there is fast internet at either end, and in the middle.


    Skype is a company that has been setup for the purpose of being sold for a
    huge profit. They currently probably aren't making too much money, but the
    huge client base and well known brand now makes it a very valuable company.
     
    Rob, Jan 1, 2007
    #19
  20. Mathew Good

    Ray Greene Guest

    On Mon, 1 Jan 2007 15:12:24 +1300, "Dave" <> wrote:

    >they (sharp) are not warrenting it for 2 years because Vodaphone has
    >Parallel inported it.
    >
    >Vodaphone say its Sharps Problem, Sharp say it's Vodaphones problem..


    Who did you buy if off? It's their problem.

    > Either way it is still not going to be repaired or replaced as it's not a
    >current model.


    If it's out of warranty then you're probably out of luck. It might be
    covered under the CGA but that depends on what a reasonable lifespan
    is for a phone.

    Screaming a lot often works :)

    --
    Ray Greene
     
    Ray Greene, Jan 1, 2007
    #20
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