What is the resolution of commercial printing?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jeff, Aug 13, 2003.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    If I hire, say a SamsClub or WalMart to print my digital photos on 4x6
    or 5x7 normal RC paper, what would be the highest resolution (dpi)
    that can be printed? For example, I cannot tell any difference on
    prints higher than 300dpi on my photo inkjet printer.

    The reason is - I would like to know the largest commercial print I
    can go on a 4MP image.

    Secondly, who has the highest quality print from digital?
    Jeff, Aug 13, 2003
    #1
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  2. The digital prints using micromirror technology are either 200 or 300 dpi.
    I've seen prints at 200 dpi on photographic paper, and you'd be hard pressed
    to tell the difference between that and a print from a negative.

    Regards,
    Aaron Queenan.

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If I hire, say a SamsClub or WalMart to print my digital photos on 4x6
    > or 5x7 normal RC paper, what would be the highest resolution (dpi)
    > that can be printed? For example, I cannot tell any difference on
    > prints higher than 300dpi on my photo inkjet printer.
    >
    > The reason is - I would like to know the largest commercial print I
    > can go on a 4MP image.
    >
    > Secondly, who has the highest quality print from digital?
    >
    >
    Aaron Queenan, Aug 13, 2003
    #2
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  3. Jeff

    Scott Guest

    If the place uses a Fuji Frontier machine, it prints at 300ppi. If
    they use a Noritsu machine, it prints at 400ppi. The largest size
    you'll be able to print with a Frontier is 5.5"x8" (3:2 factor) or
    4"x6" on the Noritsu @ 400ppi.

    If you use a solid ink jet printer, you'll be able to get up to 8x12
    at 200ppi. I wouldn't recommend going any lower than 200 (with
    275-300 being ideal).

    There is a good scan/print calculator here:

    http://www.scantips.com/calc.html

    Scott


    Jeff <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > If I hire, say a SamsClub or WalMart to print my digital photos on 4x6
    > or 5x7 normal RC paper, what would be the highest resolution (dpi)
    > that can be printed? For example, I cannot tell any difference on
    > prints higher than 300dpi on my photo inkjet printer.
    >
    > The reason is - I would like to know the largest commercial print I
    > can go on a 4MP image.
    >
    > Secondly, who has the highest quality print from digital?
    Scott, Aug 13, 2003
    #3
  4. Jeff

    Don Coon Guest

    "Scott" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If the place uses a Fuji Frontier machine, it prints at 300ppi. If
    > they use a Noritsu machine, it prints at 400ppi. The largest size
    > you'll be able to print with a Frontier is 5.5"x8" (3:2 factor)....


    Your reply reads like you're saying the Fuji system *requires* 300ppi. The
    system will take what you give it.

    For example, a 4MP shot can do an 8x10 at ~215ppi -- no problem.




    > If you use a solid ink jet printer, you'll be able to get up to 8x12
    > at 200ppi. I wouldn't recommend going any lower than 200 (with
    > 275-300 being ideal).
    >
    > There is a good scan/print calculator here:
    >
    > http://www.scantips.com/calc.html
    >
    > Scott
    >
    >
    > Jeff <> wrote in message

    news:<>...
    > > If I hire, say a SamsClub or WalMart to print my digital photos on 4x6
    > > or 5x7 normal RC paper, what would be the highest resolution (dpi)
    > > that can be printed? For example, I cannot tell any difference on
    > > prints higher than 300dpi on my photo inkjet printer.
    > >
    > > The reason is - I would like to know the largest commercial print I
    > > can go on a 4MP image.
    > >
    > > Secondly, who has the highest quality print from digital?
    Don Coon, Aug 13, 2003
    #4
  5. Jeff

    Jeff Guest

    Thanks for the info..

    Next, should I save my images as RGB or CMYK for commercial printing?
    Jeff, Aug 13, 2003
    #5
  6. On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 22:59:49 +0200, Michael Schnell wrote:

    > ... and what color resolution do they produce ( 8 Bit, 12 Bit, ... ?


    They are all color.
    Bobby New York, Aug 13, 2003
    #6
  7. Jeff

    Flycaster Guest

    "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the info..
    >
    > Next, should I save my images as RGB or CMYK for commercial printing?


    RGB.
    Flycaster, Aug 13, 2003
    #7
  8. Jeff

    George Kerby Guest

    On 8/13/03 3:56 PM, in article ,
    "Jeff" <> wrote:

    > Thanks for the info..
    >
    > Next, should I save my images as RGB or CMYK for commercial printing?
    >
    >
    >

    RGB


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    George Kerby, Aug 13, 2003
    #8
  9. Jeff

    George Kerby Guest

    On 8/13/03 5:15 PM, in article , "Bobby New
    York" <> wrote:

    > On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 22:59:49 +0200, Michael Schnell wrote:
    >
    >> ... and what color resolution do they produce ( 8 Bit, 12 Bit, ... ?

    >
    > They are all color.
    >

    Yeah, but he was asking about the depth.
    Better call your lab. Everybody does 8. The higher ones can be resampled but
    if they have to do it they charge extra. They will also tell you other
    parameters that they will accept. If you don't do the files a specific way:
    extra $$$$


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    George Kerby, Aug 13, 2003
    #9
  10. If I may chirp in here a bit:
    I am not using a commercial printer by the strick definiation -- more of
    midrange reprographics type stuff. But, I was given a disc and printout of
    the printer being used for my photos/artwork etc. I used it to calibrate my
    monitor and tweek Photoshop to match this. I have had great results. Also,
    as was said below, "IF YOU ARE PRINTING COMMERCIALLY, GET INTO AN INTIMATE
    RELATIONSHIP WITH > YOUR PRINTER AND DO WHAT THE PRINTER SAYS, NOT WHAT
    SOMEONE ELSE SAYS" Yes!!! This holds true even with photos that may be
    displayed or sold. The lab I use is great and I have learned their madness
    and limitations and they have learned mine. I compensate for it before I
    sent work to them and they know when I missed something. I pay more than I
    would like, but, I am my customers love the results.
    "Scott Ranger" <> wrote in message
    news:ItK_a.99233$...
    > I've missed the first part of this thread but want to throw a big "WHOA!"

    on
    > this question's answer. If you are working on anything that will be
    > commercially printed, you *MUST* work with either a designer who really
    > knows his stuff and/or the actual printer who will place the ink on the
    > paper. The answer to this question is NOT so simple. IT DEPENDS! On many
    > things! I'm the prepress guy at a print shop and I have to deal with

    fouled
    > up files every day, done by people who, because they have a computer and a
    > program that *seems* to do what they want it to, instantly think of
    > themselves as designers. The bane of my existence! In many cases, it costs
    > the customer more for me to fix his problems than if he had me do it in

    the
    > first place.
    >
    > IF YOU ARE PRINTING COMMERCIALLY, GET INTO AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP WITH
    > YOUR PRINTER AND DO WHAT THE PRINTER SAYS, NOT WHAT SOMEONE ELSE SAYS!
    >
    > Scott Ranger
    >
    > "Flycaster" <> wrote in message
    > news:3f3ab9b2$...
    > > "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Thanks for the info..
    > > >
    > > > Next, should I save my images as RGB or CMYK for commercial printing?

    > >
    > > RGB.
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    John E. Budzinski, Aug 14, 2003
    #10
  11. Jeff

    George Kerby Guest

    On 8/14/03 6:35 AM, in article
    ItK_a.99233$, "Scott Ranger"
    <> wrote:

    > I've missed the first part of this thread but want to throw a big "WHOA!" on
    > this question's answer. If you are working on anything that will be
    > commercially printed, you *MUST* work with either a designer who really
    > knows his stuff and/or the actual printer who will place the ink on the
    > paper. The answer to this question is NOT so simple. IT DEPENDS! On many
    > things! I'm the prepress guy at a print shop and I have to deal with fouled
    > up files every day, done by people who, because they have a computer and a
    > program that *seems* to do what they want it to, instantly think of
    > themselves as designers. The bane of my existence! In many cases, it costs
    > the customer more for me to fix his problems than if he had me do it in the
    > first place.
    >
    > IF YOU ARE PRINTING COMMERCIALLY, GET INTO AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP WITH
    > YOUR PRINTER AND DO WHAT THE PRINTER SAYS, NOT WHAT SOMEONE ELSE SAYS!
    >
    > Scott Ranger
    >
    > "Flycaster" <> wrote in message
    > news:3f3ab9b2$...
    >> "Jeff" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Thanks for the info..
    >>>
    >>> Next, should I save my images as RGB or CMYK for commercial printing?

    >>
    >> RGB.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >

    He asked CMKY or RGB? He was NOT doing presswork (CMYK). EVERY photolab that
    I have dealt with wants RGB. The answer to his question was "RGB", period.
    However, your advice was accurate and good common sense.


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    George Kerby, Aug 14, 2003
    #11
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